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Author Topic: Quick and easy dinner ideas for coven discussion evenings  (Read 6429 times)
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« Topic Start: November 18, 2009, 08:05:28 pm »

Posting this in here, because I suddenly realised folks around here might have good ideas. So, one of the things no one ever talks about with coven work is how you make the practical details work. In my case, I'm looking at doing evening discussion/class sessions two or three times a month on a weeknight. It obviously makes sense to feed people in the process, but there are some limitations.

- Potluck (which we do for rituals) is possible, but people will likely be coming from work with limited resources for keeping something cold all day, etc. I'd rather provide something main-dish like, and ask people to bring more portable options (crackers and cheese, dessert, etc.) that can be a little more flexible.

- I don't want to be fussing about last minute food prep as people are showing up - i.e. taking something out of the oven is fine, but keeping an eye out to make sure the pasta doesn't overcook is more fiddly than I want. (5 minute flexible range, in other words, is ideal.)

- Likewise, I don't want to wait for food to cook more than 5-10 minutes after people get there. (Heating up soup in a pan, fine. Boiling pasta from scratch and heating a sauce, not so great.)

- I don't want to spend tons of money on this - my own food budget is about $150 a month (for one person), and given that I'll be doing this 2-3 nights a month, don't want any given meal to cost much above $6-10 for 3-4 people.

- My own food habits are meat-heavy at lunch (since work feeds me quite well) and simpler at night (pasta, veggies, etc.) Crockpot meals might make sense in other ways, but I don't want to do anything that's "Take half a dozen chicken legs" or "Take a roast and..."

- I live by myself, and have a smallish fridge (it's a bit smaller than most apartment/house fridges, and usually full with my own stuff, since I grocery shop once a week). I also don't own a microwave (and really have nowhere to put one - 400 square foot house, no kitchen flat space that I can reliably reach safely that will also take a microwave.) Leftovers need to be things I can freeze, and reheat on stovetop or oven.

- I've got a strong preference for avoiding heavily processed foods. (Canned cream of mushroom soup is a comfort food, but I try not to have it too often, etc.) I'd also prefer a bunch of seasonal recipes. (And I've got a budget preference for making from scratch, too, or close to it.)

- I do enjoy cooking, bake my own bread most of the time, etc. but have limited time/energy after I get home from work. (I work a 9+ hour day, so usually need to come home and sit down for a bit first, and there's usually a tad of last minute cleaning or setting up for class that needs to happen too.) Advance prep is possible, but day of prep should involve less than 10-15 minutes.

Foods that have worked so far:
- Soup, bread, and cheese
- Chicken wild-rice stew (made ahead and reheated)
- Homemade pizza (assuming I'm home early enough to get the dough out and let it come to room temp first, which happens about half the time.)
- Cold plates in summer - hummus, baba ganoush, pita bread, salads, etc.


Food limits:

- Currently no major allergies, aversions, or things people don't eat, but I'd like to come up with a range of items that could be adapted if/when we do.
- My one major aversion is that peppers and I don't get along terribly well: I prefer not to cook them.

I don't own a crockpot, but do have somewhere one could go, and am seriously considering it, but would love recipes that don't involved processed foods to start, and that are meat-minimal or meat-free for this particular application.
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« Reply #1: November 18, 2009, 09:55:24 pm »


My personal meals tend to be meat-heavier than it sounds like you want to go, so .. well, that's not good.  But it REALLY sounds like you want a crockpot.

Potatoes are AMAZINGLY GOOD in a crockpot, and very little work.  Beans are good.

Pasta is doable, but tricky.  Rice also.  Do a test run or two and make sure you have it how you want it before you do it for people.

Stews are AMAZINGLY EASY.  Throw in the meat, the veggies, the potatoes, the water.  Cover.  Walk away. Smiley  You can even prep it the night before, stick it in the fridge, and stick it in the crockpot right before you leave for work, though it's not recommended.

Seriously, I really think you want a crockpot.
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« Reply #2: November 18, 2009, 10:49:08 pm »

Stews are AMAZINGLY EASY.  Throw in the meat, the veggies, the potatoes, the water.  Cover.  Walk away. Smiley  You can even prep it the night before, stick it in the fridge, and stick it in the crockpot right before you leave for work, though it's not recommended.

Even better throw in the meat (coated in flour and browned), stock, spices, and a little wine or ale/beer the night before (some onions and garlic are also great if you feel like browning them). Turn it on high for a couple of hours till you go to bed. Turn it to low, and leave it cooking until an hour or two before you're going to need it the next day (yes, cooking stew for 24 hours is perfectly reasonable), turn it up to high and throw in the veggies (you can stick them in at the beginning, but they have a tendency to get over-cooked which isn't an issue for the other ingredients). Two hours later you have the best stew you've ever tasted. Seriously. Cooking it more only makes it better. Same with most crockpot curries.
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« Reply #3: November 18, 2009, 11:06:16 pm »

My personal meals tend to be meat-heavier than it sounds like you want to go, so .. well, that's not good.  But it REALLY sounds like you want a crockpot.

I'm not opposed to meat in general - just that a lot of the crockpot meals that have been suggested other places are 'take large lump of meat and add stuff', and that's not where I want to go with this.

(Why? Budget reasons - because, hi, teaching out of the goodness of my heart, not really willing to also blow a quarter of my food budget on this given that it's going to be 3+ nights a month. But also because I usually do a meat-heavy meal at work, and don't want to do something heavy at home, too. Also, eventually, somewhat problematic for some of the energy work classes will involve down the road.)

But veggie-heavy dishes, yes. (I also understand it's possible to do amazing caramelised onions in a crockpot, and those are never a bad thing in my book.)
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« Reply #4: November 19, 2009, 03:19:08 am »


Soups are great for this kind of thing and really economical. You can do whatever you like (veg, meat, pulses etc) and you can just leave it to cook for hours. The advantage I find to these is that you can make lots of it and freeze some for later use. Stews have the same good points as they too are freezable and there are no rules saying that you can't serve them again at the next gathering. I also love the fact that for both of these, leftovers are perfectly acceptable ingredients!
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« Reply #5: November 19, 2009, 07:36:40 am »

I don't own a crockpot, but do have somewhere one could go, and am seriously considering it, but would love recipes that don't involved processed foods to start, and that are meat-minimal or meat-free for this particular application.

My old crock pot standby:  Chili.  One can tomato juice + one can beans (or ~2 cups if you've got some cooked from scratch--which you can also do in the crock pot!) + one pound of your favorite ground meat (optional, or you can cut it back without too much consequence) + one onion, diced + chili powder (or other spices as desired; oregano, cumin and garlic are always good, too) to taste.  Cook on low all day.  Relatively inexpensive, especially if you don't use much/any meat and do the beans from scratch, and it makes quite a bit so even with 3-4 adults eating you should be able to squeak out a little leftover that will freeze excellently and reheat well on the stove.

The beans, btw:  Put beans in crock pot (unplugged) and fill with water.  Let soak overnight.  In the morning, drain and replace the water, then let the beans cook on low 12-24 hours.  (I think I got this one from Brina.)

My only problem with the crock pot has been that it seems to dry out meat, even if I have fat/liquid/etc. in there to keep it moist.  I think this is because on a weekday I have to set it up at about 5-5:30am and then leave it until around 6pm; it's just plain cooking too long.  This seems to be more of a problem with chunks of meat than with small pieces or ground (as in a stew), though.

A non-crockpot recipe:  Casserole.  You can do this with whatever veggies you have around, fresh or frozen or whatever, and about half a pound of ground meat or no meat at all.  Chop up the veg and toss it in a casserole dish.  Stir in sauce to bind it--you can use a can of the dreaded cream of mushroom, or you can make bechamel, which is super-easy (recipe follows).  Sprinkle with bread crumbs, bake at 400 for about an hour until it looks golden brown and delicious.  Serves about 4 in my experience, and I've actually used it as a complete meal.  If you're generous with the veg, you might get some leftovers out of it, which do freeze well and I would presume could reheat in the oven.

Bechamel:  Melt 2 Tbsp butter in a small saucepan.  When it's good and bubbly, add 2 Tbsp flour and whisk to combine.  Slowly add one cup milk, a little at a time, whisking constantly.  Once it's all in, you may need to simmer for a few minutes to thicken.  Otherwise, season with salt and pepper to taste, and you're good to go.
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« Reply #6: November 19, 2009, 07:38:34 am »

Potatoes are AMAZINGLY GOOD in a crockpot, and very little work. 

Huh.  I never thought to try.  Do you just throw them in, scrubbed and chopped, maybe a little oil to coat?  Or is there anything else that needs done/added/etc.?
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« Reply #7: November 19, 2009, 08:07:01 am »

I'm not opposed to meat in general - just that a lot of the crockpot meals that have been suggested other places are 'take large lump of meat and add stuff', and that's not where I want to go with this.

(Why? Budget reasons - because, hi, teaching out of the goodness of my heart, not really willing to also blow a quarter of my food budget on this given that it's going to be 3+ nights a month. But also because I usually do a meat-heavy meal at work, and don't want to do something heavy at home, too. Also, eventually, somewhat problematic for some of the energy work classes will involve down the road.)

But veggie-heavy dishes, yes. (I also understand it's possible to do amazing caramelised onions in a crockpot, and those are never a bad thing in my book.)


http://www.amazon.com/Best-Vegetarian-Slow-Cooker-Recipes/dp/0778801047/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258635905&sr=8-3

and if I remember correctly, not too much tofu.

125 Best Vegetarian Slow Cooker Recipes (Paperback)
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« Reply #8: November 19, 2009, 12:31:16 pm »

Huh.  I never thought to try.  Do you just throw them in, scrubbed and chopped, maybe a little oil to coat?  Or is there anything else that needs done/added/etc.?

I usually throw in potatoes WITH something else, like a beef brisquit or something, so they soak in whatever else is going on in there.

But - I've done potatoes stovetop, and I've done them crockpot, and I think crockpot is WAY SUPERIOR.  They pick up all the flavors of the beer and catsup (if I'm doing brisquit) or the stew or the wine or whatever else I'm cooking with, and they just fall apart when you poke them, and they end up really tender and flavorful.
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« Reply #9: November 19, 2009, 01:24:05 pm »

I don't own a crockpot, but do have somewhere one could go, and am seriously considering it, but would love recipes that don't involved processed foods to start, and that are meat-minimal or meat-free for this particular application.

Well, I have years of survival cooking experience.

Survival cooking is what you do when you get home at 5:00 PM and need to feed the family somehow before hockey/soccer/dance/music/?Huh at 7:00.

Survival cooking 101

Take any protein food (pre cooked chicken, ground beef, tofu ground beef,  canned black beans, whatever?)

Toss in a fry pan and add frozen mixed vegetables (your choice)

Add a can of soup (flavour depending on type of meal), and can of water and either instance rice or pasta.

Season to taste, cover and simmer for about 15 minutes.

Favourite blends for my family:

Ground beef, kernal corn, tomato soup, elbow macaroni, with onion power, garlic powder, salt, pepper, paprica and chilli powder. Sprinkle with cheese when serving.

Cut up chicken (saved from last nights roast), mixed veggies (carrots, peas, corn), mushroon soup, minute rice, pepper, onion and garlic powder, whatever herbs are in the pantry (parsley, oregano, basil)

Black beans, canned diced tomatoes, minute rice, chili powder, cumin, onion and garlic powder. A little beef broth enhances the flavour of this.

Cut up chicken, frozen green peas, chicken broth, minute rice, soy sauce, honey, vinegar (to taste) for a sweet and sour dish.

This is basically hamburger helper, using your own ingredients. If you have a little more time, or are particularly picky about food quality, you can use fresh ingredients. One of our favourite empty nest dishes is just ground beef, to which I add chopped onions, garlic and celery. Brown all till onions wilt, then add sliced carrots, potatoes, and green beans, Add a little soy sauce (I use this in place of salt), seasonings or herbs, some beef broth and a pinch of sugar. Simmer for about 20 minutes, then finish with a little sour cream.

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« Reply #10: November 19, 2009, 06:14:49 pm »

This is basically hamburger helper, using your own ingredients. If you have a little more time, or are particularly picky about food quality, you can use fresh ingredients. One of our favourite empty nest dishes is just ground beef, to which I add chopped onions, garlic and celery. Brown all till onions wilt, then add sliced carrots, potatoes, and green beans, Add a little soy sauce (I use this in place of salt), seasonings or herbs, some beef broth and a pinch of sugar. Simmer for about 20 minutes, then finish with a little sour cream.

Or take tuna, peas, rice and cheddar soup with a touch of milk added. Makes for a quick lunch, though I would not serve it to guests, but my kid loves it.
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« Reply #11: November 19, 2009, 07:27:03 pm »

It obviously makes sense to feed people in the process, but there are some limitations.

I'll second (or third, or fourth) the practicality of the crock pot; I have several. I'm serving a mixed gathering meal (vegetarians and carnivores) at least 2-3 times a month and I don't know how I'd manage it (and not blow the budget) with out them. I do a lot of soups and stews, and crock pots are also great for sauces; pasta isn't that much trouble when the sauce is all hot and ready waiting. Another alternative I use is couscous - it's even faster than pasta.

You can also do a killer rice pudding (and porridge, if you like it for a savory meal) in them.
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« Reply #12: November 22, 2009, 08:35:55 pm »



I think a crockpot could really be your friend here.  I have one that came with inserts, so I can use it as a regular crock pot or I can put water in the crock part, put in the inserts and use it as a warmer to keep dips, etc. the right temperature.  Normally, I do not use my crock pot for meaty dishes (the exception being pot roast).  Mine is used for soups and stews.  Some of my faves are chicken corn chowder, chili, tortilla soup, bean soup, veggie soup, and ham and lentil ragout.  Add some crusty bread to any of those and you have a nice warm dinner.  You could do beans and rice - precook the rice, do the beans in the crock pot all day and then throw them together before everyone arrives.

I have a "stitch and bitch" at my house once a month and usually just serve light dinner foods - veggie pizza, crudites, hummus, pita chips, meat and cheese tray, seven layer dip, various wraps, etc.  I always kind of figure as long as people aren't starving them I'm o.k.  I'm not trying to fill them up, just make sure they're comfortable while they're here.  If they need to have a snack later, then that's fine.  I think typically people are not thinking I'm going to serve them a four-course meal, and your folks probably are thinking the same thing.  And don't underestimate the power of dessert!  A light dinner and then pie or cake or bread pudding and coffee would be wonderful!  Some Bailey's in the coffee would be one step above wonderful!
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« Reply #13: November 23, 2009, 06:53:10 pm »

- Homemade pizza (assuming I'm home early enough to get the dough out and let it come to room temp first, which happens about half the time.)

You could do the pizzas on flat bread and then you wouldn't have to let it come to room temp.

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« Reply #14: November 24, 2009, 08:47:23 am »


Foods that have worked so far:
- Soup, bread, and cheese
- Chicken wild-rice stew (made ahead and reheated)
- Homemade pizza (assuming I'm home early enough to get the dough out and let it come to room temp first, which happens about half the time.)
- Cold plates in summer - hummus, baba ganoush, pita bread, salads, etc.


Food limits:

- Currently no major allergies, aversions, or things people don't eat, but I'd like to come up with a range of items that could be adapted if/when we do.
- My one major aversion is that peppers and I don't get along terribly well: I prefer not to cook them.

I don't own a crockpot, but do have somewhere one could go, and am seriously considering it, but would love recipes that don't involved processed foods to start, and that are meat-minimal or meat-free for this particular application.

Split pea soup- a winter fave of mine, with or without ham.  If you do this in the crock pot, you don't need to puree it as it usually does it for you.

1 lb split peas
1 medium onion
1-2 stalks celery
1 large carrot
2 quarts water, hot
salt and pepper to taste
a couple bay leaves, if you like the flavor- do fish them out before serving.
1 cup diced ham, if you wish.

Chop the veggies fine as you can.  The smaller they are, the smoother the soup will be.  Toss it all in the crock pot and run on high for two hours, then reduce the heat to low until serving time.  Add a little water if it needs it.  Serve with a good, crusty bread.

Avoglomeno soup is another fave.

Make a half gallon of chicken broth.  I start with a whole chicken, tossed in a pot with a couple small onions, a couple stalks of celery, and a carrot and I boil the daylights out of it, skim the nasty looking stuff off, strain out the veggies, cool until the fat rises and lift off 90% of that, then pick off the meat.  I get about a gallon of broth from a 5lb hen, easy.  If you don't have room to store the extra, just buy a whole chicken breast with the skin on and bones in and do a half gallon batch.  Once the broth is ready, add the meat back to it, 1 or 2 cups of long grain rice (depending on how much rice you like in yours) and the juice of a lemon.  You can also toss the skin in while it is simmering to add more flavor.  Once the rice is cooked, lift out the rind and bring to a boil.  Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.  Remove from the heat and stir in 3 scrambled eggs, stirring in one direction slowly.  Serve immediately.

You can do this vegetarian, too, by using a veggie broth instead.  You could cook off the broth in the crock pot to save yourself a lot of time standing over it.  If you don't want that much meat in the soup, you can save some for adding to salads or other dishes.  I freeze 1cup baggies of cooked chicken meat for adding to my omnivores' meals.

Beef stroganoff works nicely, too.  Brown 1lb meat (Ground beef or stew beef, sliced thin and cut into strips) for every 6 people.  Drain fat.  Add 1/2lb fresh mushrooms, 1 medium onion, slivered and saute until the onions are translucent.  Add 4 cups water, deglaze your pan and bring to a boil.  Add 1lb egg noodles.  Cook until noodles are tender, drain off any excess water (which also reduces the fat in the dish), add about a cup of either half and half or cream, 1 pkg au jus or brown gravy mix and warm gently, adjust seasoning and add a cup of sour cream.  This takes no more than 1/2 an hour.  You can toss in half a pound of chopped broccoli, too, or zucchini. 

Veggie stroganoff is also fabu.  I've used the "veggie crumbles" instead of meat, but I've also done it with twice the mushrooms, broccoli and zucchini and everyone loved it.

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