The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
April 05, 2020, 09:30:07 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 05, 2020, 09:30:07 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: A Mental Exercise  (Read 11117 times)
Melamphoros
Staff
Grand Adept Member
***
Last Login:March 28, 2015, 11:01:26 pm
United States United States

Religion: Informed Eclectic with Hellenic Overtones
TCN ID: Melamphoros
Posts: 13621


Kiss My Scythe

Blog entries (0)


« Reply #15: January 04, 2010, 05:57:54 am »

I hated that book. I was given some advice before I read it- that advice was to have a cushion, a box of tissues, some chocolate, and a great deal of patience when you read it. The tissues are for when you cry, the chocolate to make you feel a little better, patience as this happened long ago and can't be changed, and a cushion to either hit, throw or cuddle (probably all three).

It also helps to have a red-ink pen so you can correct the shoddy grammer (someone at that publisher needs to be fired), cross out the filler and write snarky (or pleading to your deity of choice to put you out of your misery) comments in the margins.  I have not done this as I don't have the patience to slug through my copy of Eragon again.  I read it....four years ago (?) and will probably have to wait another four until I recover completely.

I think that my advice and the advice you mentioned are good for any book that's said to be bad.
Logged



Jesus saves, Allah forgives, Cthulhu thinks you will make a great sandwich.
My Spiritual Blog

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

Dark Midnight
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:July 05, 2011, 01:47:57 am
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Religious Crystal Witch and FlameKeeper
Posts: 3079


1 beautiful soul is worth a thousand pretty faces!

Blog entries (0)

Sharon-Anne Bateman


Ignore
« Reply #16: January 04, 2010, 06:06:07 am »

I think that my advice and the advice you mentioned are good for any book that's said to be bad.

You mean rather than throwing it out of a window?  Wink

I know what you mean though. There are books that you read and just think ' What did I even bother getting this for? It's terrible!'. That said, I do sometimes read things that others say are bad and find them to be quite good, so it can just be a matter of personal taste...
Logged

Never forget that it is MY life, no-one else's!

"Payback? Yes, I think so!"

"I seem to exist in a very pretty slice of Hell- Hello? Is there anyone else here?"
treekisser
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:July 30, 2011, 05:18:30 pm
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Bajoran
Posts: 1200


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #17: January 04, 2010, 07:37:06 am »


So I thought I'd start a thread: Pick some of that bad books you've read, not necessarily Twilight, and think about what their virtues are. 

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle.

  • Easy to read.
  • Interdimensional travel. Admittedly cool.
  • Children rescuing others. A standard YA hook.
  • Fairly interesting and amusing characterisation of the 'helper' characters, Mrs. Which, Who, and, er, the other one.
  • Identification with the underdog. The plain, pathetic, shrill and whiny underdog who nevertheless by the end of the book rescues her kid brother and inexplicably snags a kiss from a cool boy. NB: Kid brother and cool boy are separate persons.
  • Sociohistoric relevance. Book was published at the height of the Cold War. The grossly unsubtle Christian imagery, huge ethnocentric bias, and shallow soundbite-style exploration of individuality versus conformity probably reflected and flattered the American sense of self-importance.
Logged

'Whatever such a mind sees is a flower, and whatever such a mind dreams of is the moon.' - Basho
Satsekhem
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:October 16, 2011, 11:51:56 am
United States United States

Religion: Something? Somewhere?
Posts: 2991


I rock so hardcore.

Blog entries (0)

aubs.taylor
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18: January 04, 2010, 07:56:21 am »

So I thought I'd start a thread: Pick some of that bad books you've read, not necessarily Twilight, and think about what their virtues are.  If they're popular, why are they popular?

The Sign and the Seal by Graham Hancock.

  • Listed under the "new age" section, which has a certain cache in the world today.
  • Informs others about the practices of a little-known Jewish faith found in Ethiopia.

Yes, that is all I got. I mostly threw the book while I was reading (literally, threw the book) and stopped when Mr. Hancock neglected to realize that the old-time Jewish faith found in Ethiopia probably came from trade routes found in ancient Egypt as opposed to some convoluted crossing of the Red Sea.
Logged

Sekhemib-Nymaatre; spiritual blog.
Thanks For All the Fish; opinionated ranty blog.

I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I intended to be. - Douglas Adams
Satsekhem
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:October 16, 2011, 11:51:56 am
United States United States

Religion: Something? Somewhere?
Posts: 2991


I rock so hardcore.

Blog entries (0)

aubs.taylor
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #19: January 04, 2010, 07:59:10 am »

Ah, you mean like the Malleus Malefecarum?

I will admit that I would like to own a copy of it. I'm a bibliophile so if I can own really old, leather-bound books... Drool.
Logged

Sekhemib-Nymaatre; spiritual blog.
Thanks For All the Fish; opinionated ranty blog.

I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I intended to be. - Douglas Adams
Vella Malachite
Master Member
****
Last Login:July 31, 2011, 03:27:04 am
Australia Australia

Religion: Irish Celtic Reconstructionist
Posts: 368


Never underestimate carefully worded nonsense.

Blog entries (3)



Ignore
« Reply #20: January 05, 2010, 06:03:29 am »


*snip*

Yes, that is all I got. I mostly threw the book while I was reading (literally, threw the book) and stopped when Mr. Hancock neglected to realize that the old-time Jewish faith found in Ethiopia probably came from trade routes found in ancient Egypt as opposed to some convoluted crossing of the Red Sea.

Yeah, geographical/logical inaccuracy is one of the more annoying things it's possible to come across in a book.
However, like the good Mr. Eddings has proved, it's not strictly necessary.  One of my friends and I once tried to take the different maps he provided for the books and piece them together to make one big map.  When we'd got it all lined up and to size, the equator didn't match up, and part of the world that the characters didn't take very long to cross through was larger than another part that they travelled through for ages.  We laughed like hell when we found that out...

And, back on topic, an author named Cecilia Dart-Thornton attracted my scorn recently, so here's trying to find out why her Crowthistle Chronicles got published.

  • The romance probably appealed to lots of people.  It is, after all, about unconditional love.
  • The characters were human and had human motives.  Her characters weren't too Mary Sue-ish to be hateable.
  • People, unfortunately, like purple prose.  And she has it by the truckload.
  • It did have an air of tragedy about it - people might forgive the purple prose for an emotional story.

But, on the other hand, it had one of the worst plot twists I've ever seen in any story.  And that's saying something.
Logged

Minds are like parachutes: Just because you've lost yours, doesn't mean you can borrow mine.

What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter as if he is a man, but when he is a spinning ball of ammonia and methane must be silent?
Owl
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:March 07, 2012, 02:46:28 pm
United States United States

Religion: Hedgewitch?
Posts: 1428

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #21: January 05, 2010, 11:54:44 am »

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle.

  • Easy to read.
  • Interdimensional travel. Admittedly cool.
  • Children rescuing others. A standard YA hook.
  • Fairly interesting and amusing characterisation of the 'helper' characters, Mrs. Which, Who, and, er, the other one.
  • Identification with the underdog. The plain, pathetic, shrill and whiny underdog who nevertheless by the end of the book rescues her kid brother and inexplicably snags a kiss from a cool boy. NB: Kid brother and cool boy are separate persons.
  • Sociohistoric relevance. Book was published at the height of the Cold War. The grossly unsubtle Christian imagery, huge ethnocentric bias, and shallow soundbite-style exploration of individuality versus conformity probably reflected and flattered the American sense of self-importance.

I loved it at 8 yrs old (probably newly published - and I think I was 8 (1966 that would be)), and it did hook me on sci fi and fantasy.  But then I did meet her and listen to talk from her at my elementary school.  That may have made a difference.
Logged

AntlerandHerb.com
Rowanfox
Master Member
****
Last Login:December 02, 2010, 12:55:53 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: Gardnerian
Posts: 472


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #22: January 05, 2010, 02:10:09 pm »



So I thought I'd start a thread: Pick some of that bad books you've read, not necessarily Twilight, and think about what their virtues are.  If they're popular, why are they popular?



Dan Brown's books, Angels and Demons and The DaVinci Code.

Why so popular? Well, the Illuminati and secret conspirices and the Grail, oh my.

And, of course, the action was so non-stop that one almost missed the lack of character development.

Two movies later, the books still seem as popular as ever.... buyt really, as literature goes......ugh.

Logged

Owl
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:March 07, 2012, 02:46:28 pm
United States United States

Religion: Hedgewitch?
Posts: 1428

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #23: January 05, 2010, 02:16:05 pm »

Dan Brown's books, Angels and Demons and The DaVinci Code.

Why so popular? Well, the Illuminati and secret conspirices and the Grail, oh my.

And, of course, the action was so non-stop that one almost missed the lack of character development.

Two movies later, the books still seem as popular as ever.... buyt really, as literature goes......ugh.



Or, as my mother said, if you're stuck in an airport with nothing else to read - buy a newspaper.
Logged

AntlerandHerb.com
Monica M.
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2011, 01:59:15 am
Australia Australia

Religion: trying to figure it out
Posts: 751

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #24: January 06, 2010, 02:50:30 am »


"Well, if it's so bad, why is it so popular?"

Anything written by Traci Harding.

I don't know if she is popular in other countries but she has some sci fi ideas in her head and convinced herself they are true.

The books are easy to read but with horribly convoluted plots and unrealistic characters.

Yet she has a cult following.
Logged
Cliona
Journeyman
***
Last Login:July 22, 2011, 11:55:35 am
United States United States

Religion: ADF, UU
Posts: 191


not quite an eagle, but not quite a goose

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #25: January 06, 2010, 02:18:47 pm »

So I thought I'd start a thread: Pick some of that bad books you've read, not necessarily Twilight, and think about what their virtues are.  If they're popular, why are they popular?

I made the unfortunate mistake of reading the Twilight series in its entirety. Though they were awful, I couldn't seem to stop.

In my desperation to find a suitable substitute, I picked up Richelle Mead's Vampire Academy. For me, the selling point was a strong female lead instead of a whiny milksop. (and if "brat" passes for "strong," it's true)

Instead, the book is filled with copouts, there is very little character development and no identifiable motivation for any character to do anything that they're doing (wow, did that make sense?), and the author seems to flip flop on sex - her lead revels in her experience but how dare you call her a slut, she's not that type of girl. The narrator then engages in a romance that is undeniably statutory. It's also poorly written, and not a good substitute for Twilight.

As for why it seems to be popular?

  • It's jumping on the vampire romance bandwagon
  • Teenagers rebelling against adults*, except the one sexy Russian adult
  • Sex appeal - both romantic interests are dark, silent, bad-boy types who turn out to be sensitive
  • Easy to read, the reader doesn't have to think much; I'm the kind of reader this bothers, though, doesn't work for me
  • An un-whiny female narrator. I'm not going to say "strong" because what she really is, is a brat, and she's not very likable. But she doesn't need a man to rescue her, she sticks up for herself, so she's definitely no Bella.


Needless to say, I couldn't finish the book, and I sold it to Half-Price Books so it wouldn't take up precious space on my shelf. It has also turned me off of Young Adult dark fantasy, or whatever you want to call it. I'm finding that Independent Reader fantasies are much more enjoyable, like The Edge Chronicles. (some bookstores lump the two sections together, but at my favorite Borders they're two separate sections, YA filled with all the romance and angst novels, IR filled with fun and adventure and Neil Gaiman)

* One of my childhood friends is now a teacher at a school for pregnant teenagers, and he made an interesting observation about books, movies, and tv shows aimed at children and tweens - they often do not have strong adult characters, and the stories have an "us vs. them" attitude, children against adults who won't listen. My friend and I both think this has the potential to be detrimental, that children need heroes their own age but also should not be encouraged to ignore the wisdom of their elders. Having bumbling, ignorant, and oblivious adults fosters this notion that adults are useless and not to be trusted. Harry Potter struck this balance perfectly, we thought. The kids still save the world, but the adults are not all useless.
Logged

I will follow you into the deep, as a young bird has to learn to fly
- Whale Rider, Edenbridge
Altair
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:December 18, 2012, 06:59:40 am
United States United States

Religion: Wiccan-ish pantheistic polytheist
Posts: 1942


Follow your star wherever it may lead

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #26: January 06, 2010, 03:42:41 pm »

And by "history" I mean the bad kind like the plague or the reign of Caligula.

Hey, what was wrong with the reign of Caligula? I thought it was *delicious*. Wink
Logged

Dark Midnight
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:July 05, 2011, 01:47:57 am
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Religious Crystal Witch and FlameKeeper
Posts: 3079


1 beautiful soul is worth a thousand pretty faces!

Blog entries (0)

Sharon-Anne Bateman


Ignore
« Reply #27: January 07, 2010, 04:48:10 am »

In my desperation to find a suitable substitute, I picked up Richelle Mead's Vampire Academy. For me, the selling point was a strong female lead instead of a whiny milksop. (and if "brat" passes for "strong," it's true)

Instead, the book is filled with copouts, there is very little character development and no identifiable motivation for any character to do anything that they're doing (wow, did that make sense?), and the author seems to flip flop on sex - her lead revels in her experience but how dare you call her a slut, she's not that type of girl. The narrator then engages in a romance that is undeniably statutory. It's also poorly written, and not a good substitute for Twilight.

Now I actually didn't mind these books (I read the first 2 on Tuesday) and I know that I have read a hell of a lot worse. The plot is a little thin at times, but they are great for a generic, not heavy, really can't be bothered with a plot that goes on for 15 books, kind of way. I've also just started Rachel Caine's Morganville Vampires series. Again, easy to read, not very heavy going, good for when you can't leave the house (I've not been outside for a week now, and still no end in sight) and you just want to relax. I started them on Tuesday night and I am halfway through book 3 (there are 6 out with a 7th due soon-yes I have them all) and I'm quite enjoying them. As someone who has every Laurell Hamilton book, I think these are a nice change.
Logged

Never forget that it is MY life, no-one else's!

"Payback? Yes, I think so!"

"I seem to exist in a very pretty slice of Hell- Hello? Is there anyone else here?"
treekisser
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:July 30, 2011, 05:18:30 pm
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Bajoran
Posts: 1200


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #28: January 07, 2010, 05:55:10 am »

It has also turned me off of Young Adult dark fantasy, or whatever you want to call it.

If you ever feel like coming back, you could try some of the more celebrated ones...like Tender Morsels by Margo Lanagan. Or stuff by Meg Rosoff, Sonya Hartnett, Garth Nix (except Lirael, ptui!). This is the more 'literary', or at least award-winning stuff.
Logged

'Whatever such a mind sees is a flower, and whatever such a mind dreams of is the moon.' - Basho
Pyperlie
Adept Member
*****
*
Last Login:July 04, 2011, 09:45:31 pm
United States United States

Religion: Agnostic
Posts: 1802

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #29: May 29, 2010, 02:31:36 pm »


But, on the other hand, it had one of the worst plot twists I've ever seen in any story.  And that's saying something.

Worse than Nancy Kress' Steal Across the SkyCheesy
Logged

~~~Pyperlie<^>

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

"Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? Our poets do not write about it; our artists do not try to portray this remarkable thing. The value of science remains unsung by singers: you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it. This is not yet a scientific age."
              -----Richard Feynman

I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night.
               ----Sarah Williams

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Moving meditation & exercise, etc? « 1 2 »
Paganism For Beginners
KHarkless 16 5353 Last post July 05, 2009, 02:00:04 am
by Diogenes
My latest writing exercise - Comments are welcome
Art, Poetry and Writing
manwitch 4 4650 Last post February 02, 2010, 05:22:58 am
by Vella Malachite
Magic exercise suggestions?
Miscellaneous Magical Discussions
Mithril 6 2690 Last post August 18, 2010, 03:42:44 pm
by Jenett
Your Path--And Your Mental Disorder « 1 2 ... 5 6 »
Faith in Everyday Life
knitsy 77 17775 Last post October 21, 2010, 11:21:15 am
by HeartShadow - Cutethulhu
Syncretized Gods and the Mental Lock Up It Causes. « 1 2 »
Reformed Kemeticism SIG
Satsekhem 25 6700 Last post January 16, 2011, 11:18:51 am
by Bastemhet
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.137 seconds with 50 queries.