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Author Topic: Recommend one novel.  (Read 13979 times)
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« Topic Start: March 10, 2010, 02:21:50 pm »

I would like to start a thread where everyone gets a chance to recommend one novel, it can be your favorite novel. One that you feel everyone should read. Fiction, nonfiction, religious, any thing you want to recommend can go in here! The only rule is one book per post, but you can recommend a series if you want.

My recommendation - "The Lies of Locke Lamora" - Scott Lynch

This is an excellent fiction novel, written in 2007. It is the first of a series of 7 (The Gentlemen Bastard Sequence) It's one of those books you can't put down until it's done.

It is about a master con man, and a gang of thieves and cons, set in the past when cons were still a new thing. The landscape is described beautifully in this book, it is like old Romanesque cities. The story is brilliant, some really bad and surprising things happen, very entertaining. The second book "Red Seas Under Red Skies" is great as well, I think this is going to be one of those instant classic series.

It's really an awesome book, you will love it from beginning to end!

Now lets see what you pagans got for me.
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« Reply #1: March 10, 2010, 03:55:08 pm »


The Curse of Chalion, by Lois McMaster Bujold.

It's such a DIFFERENT view of spirituality and theology and gods .. I love it.  It really gives a feeling of what the world is like with gods meddling, and what it is to serve one.
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« Reply #2: March 10, 2010, 05:32:35 pm »

when cons were still a new thing.

Was there ever such a time?  I'm pretty sure cons were some of the first communications to ever take place.

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« Reply #3: March 10, 2010, 05:51:45 pm »

I would like to start a thread where everyone gets a chance to recommend one novel, it can be your favorite novel. One that you feel everyone should read. Fiction, nonfiction, religious, any thing you want to recommend can go in here! The only rule is one book per post, but you can recommend a series if you want.

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. It's a children's fantasy/adventure story, but I think it's better for older children, young adults and adults because the inherent word-play tends to go over most young children's heads. It reminds me a great deal of Alice in Wonderland, actually, and it's one of my very favorite books.
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« Reply #4: March 10, 2010, 07:36:46 pm »

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. It's a children's fantasy/adventure story, but I think it's better for older children, young adults and adults because the inherent word-play tends to go over most young children's heads.
My best friend talks about this book! I've yet to read it myself though. Smiley
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« Reply #5: March 10, 2010, 07:40:01 pm »

I would like to start a thread where everyone gets a chance to recommend one novel, it can be your favorite novel. One that you feel everyone should read. Fiction, nonfiction, religious, any thing you want to recommend can go in here! The only rule is one book per post, but you can recommend a series if you want.
I'll break the rules and say *everyone* needs to read some of John Keats' poetry. *sigh* He's my literature lover. ha. Seriously though, his poetry is so full of Life and the Good, the True, and the Beautiful that it's blasphemy not to read some! I recommend "Ode to a Nightingale," "When I have fears..." and some of his love letters.
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"She who stands on tiptoe / doesn't stand firm. / She who rushes ahead / doesn't go far. / She who tries to shine / dims her own light. / She who defines herself / can't know who she really is. / She who has power over others / can't empower herself. / She who clings to her work / will create nothing that endures. / If you want to accord with the Tao, / just do your job, then let go." ~ Tao Te Ching, chp. 24

"Silent and thoughtful a prince's son should be / and bold in fighting; / cheerful and merry every man should be / until he waits for death." ~ Havamal, stanza 15
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« Reply #6: March 10, 2010, 08:25:51 pm »

Was there ever such a time?  I'm pretty sure cons were some of the first communications to ever take place.

Absent

Haha, okay, point taken. It's a very good story though go read it!

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. It's a children's fantasy/adventure story, but I think it's better for older children, young adults and adults because the inherent word-play tends to go over most young children's heads. It reminds me a great deal of Alice in Wonderland, actually, and it's one of my very favorite books.

Cool, I'll put this on my list. Going to take me a while to get to it though, I've got so much more reading to do!

I'll break the rules and say *everyone* needs to read some of John Keats' poetry. *sigh* He's my literature lover. ha. Seriously though, his poetry is so full of Life and the Good, the True, and the Beautiful that it's blasphemy not to read some! I recommend "Ode to a Nightingale," "When I have fears..." and some of his love letters.

Yes John Keats is great. I have the Norton Anthology of Poetry and he is a featured poet. Some great ones.

My favorite poets - Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickenson, John Keats, William Wordsworth, Thomas Coleridge, Lord Byron.

I'm really just getting started with poetry, been attempting writing my own which can be quite fun. But I'm really not very good, I've written two poems, one is a very silly little poem. Another is a love poem.

But reading the masters of poetry, wow! Really can get the emotions going when you read a masterpiece by one of the above.

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« Reply #7: March 11, 2010, 01:16:21 am »


The Last Kingdom by Bernard Cornwell. This book is brilliant. It is a historical fiction telling the story of a young English (Northumbrian) who is kidnapped when the vikings invade and settle Northumbria.
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« Reply #8: March 11, 2010, 09:35:05 am »



I'd have to recommend Dragonlance Chronicles: Dragons of Autumn Twilight by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, which has been around since sometime in the 80s. It's a decent length book, that is very user friendly, and puts the reader in the different characters minds, and lets them see similar events through their different perspectives. It's good old fashioned escapist Sword & Sworcery, and is very fun!
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« Reply #9: March 11, 2010, 11:27:36 am »

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster. It's a children's fantasy/adventure story, but I think it's better for older children, young adults and adults because the inherent word-play tends to go over most young children's heads. It reminds me a great deal of Alice in Wonderland, actually, and it's one of my very favorite books.

DUDE. I love that book. I haven't read it since I was like, in third grade!

*hunts down copy*
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« Reply #10: March 11, 2010, 11:36:20 am »


Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke. This is a big, fat novel that begs to be lived in over several months. The worldbuilding is on par with Tolkien, the writing with Jane Austen, and the fabric of the story itself is practically mythology.


In an alternate Napoleonic Britain, where magic was once widely practiced but is now mostly studied and argued over by historians who call themselves "magicians", two men seek to bring back magic to Britain. Mr Norrell, a gentleman with the most famous magical library in Britain, seeks to tame the wild magic of the Golden Age, and make magic a proper, orderly British system. Mr. Jonathan Strange, however, seeks the magic of the most famous magician of all time, the Raven King, whose power and mystery still haunts Britain. When these two move from a master and pupil relationship to that of rivalry, everyone is too focused on their battle to notice that a far more dangerous threat is coming to Britain--all the way from the Otherworld.


Interested?  Grin

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« Reply #11: March 11, 2010, 11:43:57 am »

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke. This is a big, fat novel that begs to be lived in over several months. The worldbuilding is on par with Tolkien, the writing with Jane Austen, and the fabric of the story itself is practically mythology.


In an alternate Napoleonic Britain, where magic was once widely practiced but is now mostly studied and argued over by historians who call themselves "magicians", two men seek to bring back magic to Britain. Mr Norrell, a gentleman with the most famous magical library in Britain, seeks to tame the wild magic of the Golden Age, and make magic a proper, orderly British system. Mr. Jonathan Strange, however, seeks the magic of the most famous magician of all time, the Raven King, whose power and mystery still haunts Britain. When these two move from a master and pupil relationship to that of rivalry, everyone is too focused on their battle to notice that a far more dangerous threat is coming to Britain--all the way from the Otherworld.


Interested?  Grin



I wanna read! Gimme book! Gimmie!
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« Reply #12: March 11, 2010, 07:42:17 pm »

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster.

I'm waiting to get a copy now. Come on Amazon.

My favourite: Peter Pan. I must have read it at least once a year since I was about 6.
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« Reply #13: March 11, 2010, 08:42:19 pm »

Thank you for all of the suggestions, keep it up please! I want a book list that will last me years.

Another recommendation -

Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms can Help Save the World - Paul Stamets

This book discusses the true power of fungi! It provides food for us and animals. Provides many different types of medicine, including some that inhibits cancer and some that inhibit HIV/AIDS.

They provide much needed nutrients for trees and plants, and some mycelium mats go on for thousands of miles, effecting all of nature.

Also certain mushrooms can absorb toxins such as mercury, lead, and radiation, restoring the environment.

And of course mushroom hunting is an awesome hobby, giving anyone an excuse to get out in to nature, and learn about cool fungi, and have some rather tasty meals as well. If any of this interests you, go check out that book!
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« Reply #14: March 12, 2010, 03:39:28 pm »


Hmm. I really love "American Gods" by Neil Gaiman. And I love pretty much everything Wen Spencer has written so far, especially "Tinker," "Endless Blue" and "Alien Taste." And I reread Susan Cooper's "The Dark is Rising" sequence every winter holiday season.

I know that's more than one. :-( I read too much.
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