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Author Topic: Urban Pagan - help!  (Read 15400 times)
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« Topic Start: July 23, 2010, 09:45:47 am »

I hope you'll excuse me, maybe I should have posted this in the newbie section, or maybe there are loads of information on this subject other places on this site that I couldn't find...
I hope for some advice from those of you practising your Pagan faith in urban areas.

Growing up on a farm, it was easy enough to follow the cycles of the year, smelling spring, celebrating harvest... But as a grown up, I've made a couple of (faith-based) choices that makes being in tune with nature more difficult. I decided to become a biologist, which means that I have to live in an urban area, that's where the jobs are. I want to minimize my carbon foot print, and don't want to use a car to get to work, which means that I have to live close to the city centre.

I think I've been spoiled from living in the middle of nowhere, so now I have these strange ideas that I HAVE to have a sacred grove for my rituals, HAVE to grow my own herbs in a garden, HAVE to see the full moon reflected in water, and so on, haha.

When you live in the middle of a city, what do you do to stay close to nature? Are there other aspects I could focus on while I'm saving up money to buy a house with a garden?
I feel like I've lost my faith, and the "natural" approach to my faith, while I've been living in the city... Any feedback would be much appreciated.
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« Reply #1: July 23, 2010, 09:57:08 am »



Go to parks, heck, just going outside and feeling the wind and sun on your face, listening to the birds singing.  Just cause you're in town doesn't mean there is no nature outside.  Look down at the sidewalks, bet you see clumps of grass or weeds growing in the cracks.

Grow potted plants in/on your window sill.  Want to see the moon reflected in water? Put a bowl of water in your window.  I guess my point is, there is nature, ways to observe it, you just have to be creative. Smiley

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« Reply #2: July 23, 2010, 10:04:20 am »

HAVE to grow my own herbs in a garden, HAVE to see the full moon reflected in water, and so on, haha.

I'm neither terribly urban nor terribly nature-focused, so I don't have a lot of advice here (not that you'd know it from the long ramble that follows), but--you can do both of these things in a city, can't you?  You could grow herbs in pots, and I think I've seen other options involving hanging plastic bottles or some such, though I'm having trouble finding the article I saw on that now.

As for the water, maybe I'm missing the point, but if you can look out your window (or up from a balcony or patio if you have such a thing) and see the moon, shouldn't you theoretically be able to position a bowl of water so that it reflects the moon?  Being in a bowl doesn't make it any less water than if it were in a lake or a river.  If your city is in a rainy area and you have anything you can sit a bowl or a cup on outside (balcony, fire escape, even a wide window ledge) you could collect rainwater for this purpose.

I think maybe the thing is to think creatively.  Don't get stuck in "I have to do this exactly this way and I can't if I don't have at least a garden"; look for solutions that allow you to adapt to your surroundings.  You could, for example, observe how the city changes with the seasons--it won't be the same as planting a field, watching it grow, and then harvesting food from it, but that doesn't mean there isn't a cycle anyway.  (If nothing else, there's probably *some* sort of weather cycle, though how dramatic the change over the course of it is will of course depend on exactly where you're at.)  Most cities have some form of "natural" life in them--city parks, trees or flowers planted for decoration here and there, birds, even cockroaches and rats.  You could see what you can find and how you can experience nature through the lens of those things.

Another thought here:  Is a city not "natural" just because it's man-made?  Would you say that a beaver dam is "nature"?  What makes a skyscraper different from a beaver dam?  I don't know if trying to see man and man-made objects as part of nature will be a useful angle for you personally, but it might be worth thinking about at least.  I've been told that cities have a life and a pulse of their own; maybe it would help you to try to seek that out, rather than trying to transplant a rural practice into the city.
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« Reply #3: July 23, 2010, 10:17:00 pm »

You could, for example, observe how the city changes with the seasons--it won't be the same as planting a field, watching it grow, and then harvesting food from it, but that doesn't mean there isn't a cycle anyway.  (If nothing else, there's probably *some* sort of weather cycle, though how dramatic the change over the course of it is will of course depend on exactly where you're at.)  Most cities have some form of "natural" life in them--city parks, trees or flowers planted for decoration here and there, birds, even cockroaches and rats.  You could see what you can find and how you can experience nature through the lens of those things.

Another thought here:  Is a city not "natural" just because it's man-made?  Would you say that a beaver dam is "nature"?  What makes a skyscraper different from a beaver dam?  I don't know if trying to see man and man-made objects as part of nature will be a useful angle for you personally, but it might be worth thinking about at least.  I've been told that cities have a life and a pulse of their own; maybe it would help you to try to seek that out, rather than trying to transplant a rural practice into the city.
Heh - I'm redundant.  These two paragraphs are exactly the two key points I'd make about urban practice of a nature-based path (phrased much as I was planning to, too).

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« Reply #4: July 24, 2010, 04:24:52 pm »


Nature is everywhere.

Plants and animals do not ask about a natural or un-natural environment, they ask about conditions being good or not.

So there are birds and foxes in the cities, plants push their way to the sun - concrete or not.

And since I'm a other-worldly kind of witch, the 'other' place is right there too, sometimes you can attune to it. And there might be groves in the middle of a four way crossing. (If this makes sense now, if not sorry Wink)

Even in a city you can attune to the change of seasons or tides of day and month.
It is sometimes a bit more difficult - agreed - but I think this is more about us rushing through our days and getting involved in the daily hustle too much, than about nature being too far away.

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« Reply #5: July 26, 2010, 10:46:50 am »

I hope you'll excuse me, maybe I should have posted this in the newbie section, or maybe there are loads of information on this subject other places on this site that I couldn't find...
I hope for some advice from those of you practising your Pagan faith in urban areas.

Growing up on a farm, it was easy enough to follow the cycles of the year, smelling spring, celebrating harvest... But as a grown up, I've made a couple of (faith-based) choices that makes being in tune with nature more difficult. I decided to become a biologist, which means that I have to live in an urban area, that's where the jobs are. I want to minimize my carbon foot print, and don't want to use a car to get to work, which means that I have to live close to the city centre.

I think I've been spoiled from living in the middle of nowhere, so now I have these strange ideas that I HAVE to have a sacred grove for my rituals, HAVE to grow my own herbs in a garden, HAVE to see the full moon reflected in water, and so on, haha.

When you live in the middle of a city, what do you do to stay close to nature? Are there other aspects I could focus on while I'm saving up money to buy a house with a garden?
I feel like I've lost my faith, and the "natural" approach to my faith, while I've been living in the city... Any feedback would be much appreciated.

I like the answers others have given.  I have an additional idea...about utilizing the power of imagination and memory, to make the most use of those times when you can be more fully immersed in nature.  When you do once in a while get to a park or wild area where you can be completely alone or surrounded by nature, make sure that you deeply inhale from that experience, and then use all the sense-memories you've stored, to continually draw from these experiences later on when you are in more highly urban areas.  The power of imagination is to me one of the key aspects to my variety of Paganism, and with its power, you can indeed be in a Sacred Grove every time you do a ritual, even if you're in the middle of downtown Manhattan in a skyscraper, by making good use of imagination, and symbols and altar tools, perhaps pictures and photographs, a bouquet of flowers or wreath, potted plants or branches or other natural items.  To me, developing the power of imagination is so important, that I could see it as beneficial to live in an urban area, if living there facilitates its development...

I also take great comfort in the sky.  Because wherever we are, no matter how urban, the sky is there, the sun and moon are there, high over all.
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« Reply #6: July 31, 2010, 10:53:53 am »

I hope you'll excuse me, maybe I should have posted this in the newbie section, or maybe there are loads of information on this subject other places on this site that I couldn't find...
I hope for some advice from those of you practising your Pagan faith in urban areas.

Growing up on a farm, it was easy enough to follow the cycles of the year, smelling spring, celebrating harvest... But as a grown up, I've made a couple of (faith-based) choices that makes being in tune with nature more difficult. I decided to become a biologist, which means that I have to live in an urban area, that's where the jobs are. I want to minimize my carbon foot print, and don't want to use a car to get to work, which means that I have to live close to the city centre.

I think I've been spoiled from living in the middle of nowhere, so now I have these strange ideas that I HAVE to have a sacred grove for my rituals, HAVE to grow my own herbs in a garden, HAVE to see the full moon reflected in water, and so on, haha.

When you live in the middle of a city, what do you do to stay close to nature? Are there other aspects I could focus on while I'm saving up money to buy a house with a garden?
I feel like I've lost my faith, and the "natural" approach to my faith, while I've been living in the city... Any feedback would be much appreciated.

Nothing is outside of nature including cities. Nature is everywhere, you just have to look and notice.

Volunteer for a local environmental group.
Check out the Pagan groups in your city. Those that organize public gatherings often hold these in parks or reachable outdoor places.
Look into the history of your city, what the land and waters once were, how they were changed, adapted and why.
Investigate your city environmentally. Are there any hot issues? Anything that needs protecting today?
Look to see if you can adopt a park or part of a nature trail. If you don't have $$ to spare, see if volunteering or advocacy is needed.
Look for natural-oriented stores or services in your area and support them with your business.
Walk every day if you can. Notice trees, gardens, plants, animals etc and the changes.
Keep a nature journal of your city through the seasons. Or write a nature blog online if you prefer.
If you have a balcony or even just a window sill, grow herbs in pots.
If you have a balcony garden, get a small composter.
Check if there are any community or co-op gardens that you might get a plot in. Or join a group trying to create such.
Look around for an outdoor healing place. It can be a certain section in a park or on a walk or even someplace reachable outside of the city if you can go camping or hiking.

Amber

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« Reply #7: July 31, 2010, 01:02:39 pm »



Change takes time.  To try to force the connection isn't going to make it a satisfying one.  I've bounced back and forth across the country so many times that I'm starting to come up with a whole new set of thoughts about how to connect to the spirit of a place. 

Trying to use your same practices in your new location may not work.  Planting tropicals in a desert climate is a recipe for disappointment.  Being open to what your new location can teach you about surviving in your new location.  When I first moved to Tx I was sort of put off by the giant artichokes growing everywhere.  (Maguey - the American cousin of the Agave)  By the time I left Tx I had really gained a fetish for it and it's varieties.  I had to completely change my style of gardening.  I'm starting all over with my new location where the water and the soil are both terrible.  I'm just sitting back watching for now.

Walking the territory is where I would start.  Pick up the rocks, look around you.  It's not all pigeons and pets.  Driving is another good time to look around.  Long freeway drives are like a birds eye view of the terrain sometimes. 

Depending on how far you're willing to commute, you can definitely find some places that still have some balance - although at the same time you put yourself on the front lines of experiencing people whose opinions about how much of the wild should remain wild will differ drastically.  I love our neighborhood coyote fringe, my neighbors would go out and do them in themselves if they dared.  I am not a fan of being woken up at 5-6am by the geese that have moved in recently (we must be a migratory stop.  Canadian Geese are just beyond rude guests.) but they really like them a lot. Personally I'm thinking go team Coyote. Get those geese.

Something that might interest - or totally gross you out is roadkill study.  You can get a closer look at some species that you wouldn't otherwise get up close and personal with.  There were beaver in an irrigation pond and some arse ran one over when it was crossing the road.  Their tails are trippy.

Give it time though.  You'll find your connection point, although you have to ride out the culture shock and try to stay open to new voices.
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« Reply #8: August 21, 2010, 08:51:20 pm »

I hope you'll excuse me, maybe I should have posted this in the newbie section, or maybe there are loads of information on this subject other places on this site that I couldn't find...
I hope for some advice from those of you practising your Pagan faith in urban areas.

....

When you live in the middle of a city, what do you do to stay close to nature? Are there other aspects I could focus on while I'm saving up money to buy a house with a garden?
I feel like I've lost my faith, and the "natural" approach to my faith, while I've been living in the city... Any feedback would be much appreciated.


I live in San Diego, California.  A decent city ALTHOUGH... we do not have normal seasons.  We have a dry season (summer..  which lasts from April to December) and wet season (any day it happens to be raining, I guess).  Many Pagans here celebrate the seasons as they would anywhere else, but most have adapted customs to fit our area.

Instead of a private grove, we go to peoples' backyards or public parks.  Some people drive an hour to the forest and countryside to have rituals there.

We embrace what nature has to offer us as it, too, adapts to man-made structures and influences.  The grass that grows between the cracks in the concrete, the native animal life, the animals that surround you (pets and strays), the plants in the park.  Here, in San Diego, we have desert plants and animals as well as native marine life.  Their energies are just as powerful as any other.  For people who live in small spaces or apartments, they may use items bought online or at stores (herbs, rocks, etc).  They cleanse them and infuse them with whatever kind of energy they want.  It may not be as gorgeous a lifestyle as being a Pagan in the countryside, but it's just as authentic.  They put their hearts and souls into it.

Have you tried meetup.com or other event and get-together sites?  They have many meetups for Pagans; all kinds of meetings.  They could help you see the beauty in the environment you live in.  Also, look for classes at metaphysical stores.  Sometimes they may be free.  They could help you get in tune with your surroundings, as well.
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« Reply #9: August 22, 2010, 10:08:04 am »


I live in San Diego, California.  A decent city ALTHOUGH... we do not have normal seasons.  We have a dry season (summer..  which lasts from April to December) and wet season (any day it happens to be raining, I guess).  Many Pagans here celebrate the seasons as they would anywhere else, but most have adapted customs to fit our area.


Depends upon what you consider normal seasons. It's normal for the Med, such as Greece and much of Italy. It's just not northern European.
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« Reply #10: September 01, 2010, 02:30:23 pm »

I hope you'll excuse me, maybe I should have posted this in the newbie section, or maybe there are loads of information on this subject other places on this site that I couldn't find...
I hope for some advice from those of you practising your Pagan faith in urban areas.

Growing up on a farm, it was easy enough to follow the cycles of the year, smelling spring, celebrating harvest... But as a grown up, I've made a couple of (faith-based) choices that makes being in tune with nature more difficult. I decided to become a biologist, which means that I have to live in an urban area, that's where the jobs are. I want to minimize my carbon foot print, and don't want to use a car to get to work, which means that I have to live close to the city centre.

I think I've been spoiled from living in the middle of nowhere, so now I have these strange ideas that I HAVE to have a sacred grove for my rituals, HAVE to grow my own herbs in a garden, HAVE to see the full moon reflected in water, and so on, haha.

When you live in the middle of a city, what do you do to stay close to nature? Are there other aspects I could focus on while I'm saving up money to buy a house with a garden?
I feel like I've lost my faith, and the "natural" approach to my faith, while I've been living in the city... Any feedback would be much appreciated.
I would suggest you to read ''city magic'' by Christopher Prenzak. It is exactly the subject of the book It is also a relatively small book and easy to read. Many of the things answered in this topic are also in the book. I live in a relatively small city so finding a natural place isn't hard for me. But after have read this book, I change my habbits. I live in a appartement so every rituals had to be outside. now, I have made myself a nice balcony herb garden and, when I am alone or with only one or two friends, have my esbats there. I often bring  my kindle with me to natural place for reading and music and also have a part of my book of shadow on it. Even if it is human made.

This book helps me understant the life of the city and look fore something else than Sacred grove in the middle of the wood.

Enjoy the reading :0
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« Reply #11: October 16, 2010, 09:43:38 am »

You don't get as many critters in the city, but you do get birds. That's one way I connect to nature. It's so exciting when the first robins appear in the spring. It's thrilling when you get a brief glimpse of a bird you don't see often - for me the bright flash of color when I spy a red bird or a blue jay. Listening the the birdsong when they "wake up the sun" in the morning, or the way they chat in the evening about how the day went for them. And it's sad when the geese start flying south in the winter, because I suffer from SAD (seasonal affective disorder) and I know the next six months are going to be hard for me. But I remind myself to watch for the robins again. And I drive between towns once a week for my job and I am thrilled when I see a raptor sitting on top of a power pole motionless, or maybe swooping across the road ahead of my car.

Even in a city there are trees and I enjoy watching the first tiny leaf buds appear, and then they open and are that fresh light green, growing bigger and deeper green. During the dry years they start to turn brown and beige in August and fall from the trees. The last couple of years have not been so dry here and I'm excited about the leaves changing color. I'm already seeing some red maple leaves and soon there will be many different shades of red and orange and yellow mixed with a few slow-to-change green ones and the evergreen branches.

I watch as the sun comes up later and sets later, and then reverses the process and the morning begins earlier and the day lasts longer. I watch as the moon changes from full to dark and back again. I live in a suburb so I can still see the moon and the brightest stars, and there are many evenings when I step outside just before bed and say goodnight to Luna, even when it's freezing cold and I can only stand it out there for a moment. The moon's cycles are also a part of natures cycles.

Just a few ideas.
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« Reply #12: November 02, 2010, 08:38:17 am »

I hope you'll excuse me, maybe I should have posted this in the newbie section, or maybe there are loads of information on this subject other places on this site that I couldn't find...
I hope for some advice from those of you practising your Pagan faith in urban areas.

Well, I don't do much Nature magic, but I do do a lot of Urban magic, sooo...

Aside from parks, planting gardens, and watching the natural fauna of the place you live in, you might also try connecting to the city itself.

City spirits are lively, vibrant creatures, much like their nature counterparts. And a good city always tries to take care of those who inhabit it. Have a chat with yours. It almost certainly has a good idea of the best places to go for what you need. And it will be more than happy to tell you.

Heck, mine is so tickled that someone talks to it directly that it often won't stop telling me useful things once I get it started.

Also, I can wholeheartedly recommend "The Urban Primitive: Paganism in the Concrete Jungle" by Raven Kaldera and Tannin Schwartzstein.

Blessings!
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« Reply #13: November 02, 2010, 03:16:13 pm »

Is a city not "natural" just because it's man-made?

I believe 'not man-made' is actually the definition of 'natural'.
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« Reply #14: November 02, 2010, 04:30:08 pm »

I believe 'not man-made' is actually the definition of 'natural'.

One definition of "natural", at least. Like many words in the English language, there are a whol;e lot of definitions for "natural".  38 are listed here: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/natural
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