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Author Topic: Urban Pagan - help!  (Read 15799 times)
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« Reply #30: April 21, 2011, 07:42:53 pm »

I agree with that point. People are certainly naturally-occurring. But many of things that people make are so far away from 'natural' that I'm not sure the term applies to them anymore(the things, not the people).  When something has to be synthesized and processed in a lab or factory to be made and then doesn't decompose it doesn't have the same origin or life cycle of a bee hive or bird's nest.


as a pantheist, i believe that if it exists it is divinity from your shoe to your nose. so, it's not necessary to go to the woods, etc. other than to see something you might find pretty.
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« Reply #31: April 21, 2011, 07:52:02 pm »

as a pantheist, i believe that if it exists it is divinity from your shoe to your nose.

Right. But my point was that just because it's divine doesn't automatically mean it's natural.

Incidentally, nature bit my shoe today.  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #32: April 21, 2011, 07:58:26 pm »

Right. But my point was that just because it's divine doesn't automatically mean it's natural.

Incidentally, nature bit my shoe today.  Roll Eyes

ha!

actually, i have a hard time separating the two thinking that if it exists it's natural. if humans create something out of plastic it's because it's human nature to do so (i.e. make stuff to make our lives seemingly easier, etc.). the fact that this plastic item doesn't get along very well with plants and animals is irrelivant.
so, everything is nature or of nature (if you will). i did read the posts with definitions etc.
anyhoo, this is how i see it. the tree is natural and divinity and the plastic water bottle is natural and divinity.
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"if you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough"-albert einstein

"not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts." -albert einstein

'somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.'-carl sagan

"blessed are the smile makers"-unknown
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« Reply #33: May 03, 2011, 07:13:20 pm »

When you live in the middle of a city, what do you do to stay close to nature? Are there other aspects I could focus on while I'm saving up money to buy a house with a garden?

I live in North Brooklyn, at the heart of the world's largest city. It is definitely a tough environment I for Pagan practice. The Brooklyn Botanical garden and Prospect Park are both nice natural refuges though.

Ironically enough, one of the best places in the city to feel a real Pagan connection is the Cloisters, an area way up in upper Manhattan where the Met's Medieval department reconstructed a Christian monastery from architectural elements, both domestic and religious, that date from the twelfth through the fifteenth century.

A lot of this supposedly Christian stuff is mixed pretty freely with pagan symbols. There are sunwheels and suncrosses everywhere. My avatar is a picture of a beautiful foliate sunwheel I discovered on a stained glass window there. There is even a chair in the unicorn room which has the wheel of the year on it.

Not to mention the walk there. If you get out at the far end of the 190th Street station (the opposite end from the elevator) there is an amazing walk up a wooded cliff-side. The first time I went was with my lover in the rain. We got wet, but the weather scared everyone else away, so there was no one to bother us. Going up those old stone steps was like climbing a slippery mountain path in some ancient wilderness. It was amazing.
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« Reply #34: May 08, 2011, 10:50:34 am »

I live in North Brooklyn, at the heart of the world's largest city. It is definitely a tough environment I for Pagan practice. The Brooklyn Botanical garden and Prospect Park are both nice natural refuges though.

Ironically enough, one of the best places in the city to feel a real Pagan connection is the Cloisters, an area way up in upper Manhattan where the Met's Medieval department reconstructed a Christian monastery from architectural elements, both domestic and religious, that date from the twelfth through the fifteenth century.

A lot of this supposedly Christian stuff is mixed pretty freely with pagan symbols. There are sunwheels and suncrosses everywhere. My avatar is a picture of a beautiful foliate sunwheel I discovered on a stained glass window there. There is even a chair in the unicorn room which has the wheel of the year on it.

Not to mention the walk there. If you get out at the far end of the 190th Street station (the opposite end from the elevator) there is an amazing walk up a wooded cliff-side. The first time I went was with my lover in the rain. We got wet, but the weather scared everyone else away, so there was no one to bother us. Going up those old stone steps was like climbing a slippery mountain path in some ancient wilderness. It was amazing.

I love NY and the very first place I ever went when I visited decades ago was all the way up to the Cloisters. I believe (it has been a while...) that the main elements were from three actual cloisters disassembled from Europe and shipped over by the Rockefellers(?). The layout of the Cloisters is in itself very meditative.
 
Many of the plants that are grown in these medieval-authentic gardens also have recorded magical purposes. Tanya Bayard published a book on the Cloister Gardens, which I bought at their gift shop and it has remained a valuable part of my herbology library over the years.

Good memories. Smiley
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