The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
September 19, 2020, 07:30:25 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 19, 2020, 07:30:25 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: Children and Your Altar.  (Read 12948 times)
NibbleKat
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:October 22, 2012, 03:45:56 pm
United States United States

Religion: Hard polytheist dedicated to Hermes, Sequana, and Sirona
Posts: 903


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #30: October 15, 2010, 03:41:28 pm »

Unless you count my three cats, I have no children. We do however invite my roommate's ten year old sister to come spend the night sometimes, and often she'll bring a friend with her to play with. That friend of hers, despite being ten, has never learned from her parents that touching someone else's things is a big no-no. She came right into my house, pointed at my roommate's and my altars, and practically yelled, HEY THEY HAVE SWORDS WHY DO YOU HAVE SWORDS OH MY GAWD. And proceeds to grab at them and play.

I have little patience for kids. That's why I have cats. I nearly took that girl's head off. "Hey, hey, hey! Is that yours?" "No." "Then put it down." "Why do you have it?" "To carve kids for dinner." "Whatever."

I have little patience for children, but it's their parents who should be to blame. I'm going to sound like an old fuddy duddy here, but... in my day, kids didn't act like they do now.  Not only are parents afraid to not be their kids' best friend if they punish them, there are some children who would call social services on their parents if they were to discipline them, because they know they can get away with it.

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line.  To me, there's nothing wrong with a little healthy fear, and kids don't have that anymore.  Parents just don't follow through with their threats. I work in retail. All the time I see parents saying things like, "No, honey, put that down. We can't get it." And then they buy it for the kid.  Or they'll give the threat of "We're going to have X punishment happen if you don't behave"... and of course, never do.

So, as much as it's convenient and easy to dislike the kids? It's the parents' fault, often. (Not that I envy them. I cannot imagine a harder job than parenthood. Ever.)
Logged

Follower of Hermes!
------------------
Available for devotional and altar art commissions at http://nibblekat.deviantart.com

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

folksymama
Master Member
****
Last Login:January 15, 2011, 01:56:10 pm
United States United States

Religion: Kitchen Witch
Posts: 526

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #31: October 15, 2010, 05:39:38 pm »

Except for the printed carry bag, that set would work fine for a child's Wiccan altar. There are candles for the Lord and the Lady, a chalice and an athame, cakes or bread and an offering plate. Other than wanting the candlesticks to be gold and silver and the handle on the knife to be black - and perhaps adding a pentacle - it would work fine.

I actually think the "Children's Mass Kit" would work too if you left out the carry bag and the crucifix...



Of course an actual pagan kids kit would be better!
Logged
veggiewolf
Adept Member
*****
*
*
Last Login:November 14, 2014, 01:04:25 pm
United States United States

Religion: Hoer of Onions / FlameKeeper
TCN ID: veggiewolf
Posts: 1467


Stop it, or I'll bury you alive in a box.

Blog entries (8)

veggiewolf morningwolfe


Ignore
« Reply #32: October 15, 2010, 07:28:40 pm »

I actually think the "Children's Mass Kit" would work too if you left out the carry bag and the crucifix...
...

Of course an actual pagan kids kit would be better!

Ok, who has the talent to make one?  Smiley
Logged

Ask me about FlameKeeping!

"I can't take HIS money; I can't print MY OWN money.  Why don't I just lay down and die?" - Homer Simpson
"My dream has been shattered into shards of a broken dream!" - Homer Simpson
Setnusutekh
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:September 13, 2017, 11:47:11 pm
Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago

Religion: Kemetic Recon, Heathen and follower of Apollo.
Posts: 67


Dua Set, Mighty One of the Two Fold Strength!

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #33: October 15, 2010, 08:07:20 pm »

I have little patience for children, but it's their parents who should be to blame. I'm going to sound like an old fuddy duddy here, but... in my day, kids didn't act like they do now.  Not only are parents afraid to not be their kids' best friend if they punish them, there are some children who would call social services on their parents if they were to discipline them, because they know they can get away with it.

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line.  To me, there's nothing wrong with a little healthy fear, and kids don't have that anymore.  Parents just don't follow through with their threats. I work in retail. All the time I see parents saying things like, "No, honey, put that down. We can't get it." And then they buy it for the kid.  Or they'll give the threat of "We're going to have X punishment happen if you don't behave"... and of course, never do.

So, as much as it's convenient and easy to dislike the kids? It's the parents' fault, often. (Not that I envy them. I cannot imagine a harder job than parenthood. Ever.)


That pretty much sounds like the parenting here. Disobey, and your parents will kick your whiny little butt. Most kids in the Caribbean are terrified of their parents and of their teachers, who can beat you too. Hell you can get bitch slapped in front of your friends as a teenager if you're rude. Worse yet is what your parents will hit you WITH....Let's not go there.

Well, I'm just a tad too young to have kids. (Oh gods if I did now, my parents won't hesitate to kill me.) However, when the little ones do come over, the shrine or altar gets covered. However, the adults are the problem. From my mom's "What the <BLEEP> is all that junk?!" to her getting a cleaning lady to clean my room when I'm at school, and I come home and see my altar cleaned messed up...which made me homicidal. Especially considering the shrine was for Set, aka Mr."ME NO LIKEY PEOPLE IN MAH SPACE" I had to re-purify the thing.

As for the little toy kits, those could work! I suppose you can make a wooden one, or maybe buy some plastic chalices from a party store or something, a battery operated candle or two and one of those plastic knives for Halloween for a start? Or for the Kemetic kiddie a nice finger painting of a Netjer and a simple shrine. (Some how I can see Big Red getting a little kick out of that. Tee hee I bet He'd be a big softie around a kid.)
Logged

Yes, I am Trini to d bone! Smiley
HeartShadow - Cutethulhu
Assistant Board Coordinator
Senior Staff
Grand Adept Member
****
Last Login:April 15, 2013, 06:53:07 pm
United States United States

Religion: FlameKeeper
TCN ID: GenevieveWood
Posts: 8627


I am the Pirate Teddybear!

Blog entries (0)

WWW
« Reply #34: October 16, 2010, 08:17:02 am »

I have little patience for children, but it's their parents who should be to blame. I'm going to sound like an old fuddy duddy here, but... in my day, kids didn't act like they do now.  Not only are parents afraid to not be their kids' best friend if they punish them, there are some children who would call social services on their parents if they were to discipline them, because they know they can get away with it.

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line.  To me, there's nothing wrong with a little healthy fear, and kids don't have that anymore.  Parents just don't follow through with their threats. I work in retail. All the time I see parents saying things like, "No, honey, put that down. We can't get it." And then they buy it for the kid.  Or they'll give the threat of "We're going to have X punishment happen if you don't behave"... and of course, never do.

So, as much as it's convenient and easy to dislike the kids? It's the parents' fault, often. (Not that I envy them. I cannot imagine a harder job than parenthood. Ever.)

As a parent, I simply must point out - you really only *see* the bad ones.  The good kids you don't see acting up, or they ask once and KNOW the no means no and if they whine it means NOTHING.

I HAVE carried my kid screaming out of places.  I will do so again if I must.  (please gods no, he weighs a ton).  If you see my child seriously acting up in public, you will see it in that location probably ONCE.

It doesn't just come down to parenting - some kids are more with it than others.  But the whole "parents are afraid of their kids" etc .. there are parents that give in.  There are parents that don't.  Guess which ones you see.
Logged




FlameKeeping website: http://www.flamekeeping.org
knitsy
Journeyman
***
Last Login:January 12, 2012, 09:51:08 am
United States United States

Religion: I am Me.
Posts: 106


Stonky Bonk.

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #35: October 16, 2010, 11:25:05 am »

I have little patience for children, but it's their parents who should be to blame. I'm going to sound like an old fuddy duddy here, but... in my day, kids didn't act like they do now.  Not only are parents afraid to not be their kids' best friend if they punish them, there are some children who would call social services on their parents if they were to discipline them, because they know they can get away with it.

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line.  To me, there's nothing wrong with a little healthy fear, and kids don't have that anymore.  Parents just don't follow through with their threats. I work in retail. All the time I see parents saying things like, "No, honey, put that down. We can't get it." And then they buy it for the kid.  Or they'll give the threat of "We're going to have X punishment happen if you don't behave"... and of course, never do.

So, as much as it's convenient and easy to dislike the kids? It's the parents' fault, often. (Not that I envy them. I cannot imagine a harder job than parenthood. Ever.)

I hear you. I was brought up on terror of my mother, but because of it, I learned restraint and discipline. I see a lot of parents today--good ones, bad ones--that act quite similar to your examples. Retail work gives you a frighteningly close look inside other people's lives. The ones that are the best parents are the firm, soft-spoken ones. Yesterday a young dad, probably in his mid-twenties, soothed his child with a quiet voice and a firm tone. "Little bro, that's the fakest cry I've ever heard. Now we're getting Mommy, and we're leaving, okay? Okay." [SO CUTE]
Logged

...Maude?

[Warning: Fool]
NibbleKat
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:October 22, 2012, 03:45:56 pm
United States United States

Religion: Hard polytheist dedicated to Hermes, Sequana, and Sirona
Posts: 903


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #36: October 18, 2010, 02:12:30 pm »

As a parent, I simply must point out - you really only *see* the bad ones.  The good kids you don't see acting up, or they ask once and KNOW the no means no and if they whine it means NOTHING.

I HAVE carried my kid screaming out of places.  I will do so again if I must.  (please gods no, he weighs a ton).  If you see my child seriously acting up in public, you will see it in that location probably ONCE.

It doesn't just come down to parenting - some kids are more with it than others.  But the whole "parents are afraid of their kids" etc .. there are parents that give in.  There are parents that don't.  Guess which ones you see.

Nope. I work in retail, I have to disagree. I do see the good ones. I actually comment to the parents when the kids say "Thank you" and "yes ma'am" and wait to talk so that they aren't interrupting. I definitely see the good ones. And I see the ones that are pitching fits that the parents don't tolerate-- like the ones who WILL leave the store that I work in, or that I am visiting, or are out in the park, whatever.  So, I see both-- but I see one a hell of a lot less than the other. 

And by comment on it, I mean that I have thanked parents before for having the most amazingly awesome kids in the world...

I agree with the above comment, too.... with retail, you see a lot of people and get a good, if brief look into their lives. When you literally see hundreds of folks a day, you get to see a good, broad spectrum.
Logged

Follower of Hermes!
------------------
Available for devotional and altar art commissions at http://nibblekat.deviantart.com
NibbleKat
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:October 22, 2012, 03:45:56 pm
United States United States

Religion: Hard polytheist dedicated to Hermes, Sequana, and Sirona
Posts: 903


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #37: October 18, 2010, 02:15:48 pm »

I hear you. I was brought up on terror of my mother, but because of it, I learned restraint and discipline. I see a lot of parents today--good ones, bad ones--that act quite similar to your examples. Retail work gives you a frighteningly close look inside other people's lives. The ones that are the best parents are the firm, soft-spoken ones. Yesterday a young dad, probably in his mid-twenties, soothed his child with a quiet voice and a firm tone. "Little bro, that's the fakest cry I've ever heard. Now we're getting Mommy, and we're leaving, okay? Okay." [SO CUTE]

Awwwhaw, that's awesome.

Smiley  Yeah, you don't have to slap kids on the rear (like my dad did) to train them. Now, if you asked me the best way to do it? I sure as hell couldn't say, because I've never tried, but I do see what works and doesn't, in many (but not all) occasions.
Logged

Follower of Hermes!
------------------
Available for devotional and altar art commissions at http://nibblekat.deviantart.com
darashand
Adept Member
*****
*
*
Last Login:August 28, 2011, 11:46:42 am
United States United States

Religion: Celtic/Germanic Heathenry
TCN ID: darashand
Posts: 1222

Gravatar

Fate favors the Fearless.

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #38: October 18, 2010, 04:25:44 pm »

Unless you count my three cats, I have no children. We do however invite my roommate's ten year old sister to come spend the night sometimes, and often she'll bring a friend with her to play with. That friend of hers, despite being ten, has never learned from her parents that touching someone else's things is a big no-no. She came right into my house, pointed at my roommate's and my altars, and practically yelled, HEY THEY HAVE SWORDS WHY DO YOU HAVE SWORDS OH MY GAWD. And proceeds to grab at them and play.

I have little patience for kids. That's why I have cats. I nearly took that girl's head off. "Hey, hey, hey! Is that yours?" "No." "Then put it down." "Why do you have it?" "To carve kids for dinner." "Whatever."

Shouldv'e given her the Look: "If you don't put that down, I might carve you for dinner!"
Logged

The only people for me are the mad ones. The ones who are mad to love, mad to talk, mad to be saved. The ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow Roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars." -Jack Kerouac
Vella Malachite
Master Member
****
Last Login:July 31, 2011, 03:27:04 am
Australia Australia

Religion: Irish Celtic Reconstructionist
Posts: 368


Never underestimate carefully worded nonsense.

Blog entries (3)



Ignore
« Reply #39: October 18, 2010, 10:35:14 pm »

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line.  To me, there's nothing wrong with a little healthy fear, and kids don't have that anymore.  Parents just don't follow through with their threats. I work in retail. All the time I see parents saying things like, "No, honey, put that down. We can't get it." And then they buy it for the kid.  Or they'll give the threat of "We're going to have X punishment happen if you don't behave"... and of course, never do.

I have to kinda agree - I think that a lot of parents are too afraid to punish their kids for fear of being labelled a 'bad parent', but I couldn't cite any other reasons, not having enough experience there.  I'm sure there are other reasons, too - working parents just too tired to deal with it f'ex...

I was never afraid of my parents growing up, but I'm known as one of the most angelic kids most people ever knew (isn't that sickening?  Roll Eyes )  I only ever threw two tantrums (but boy, were they good ones), and I never slept more than a few hours at a time, but was happy anyway.  It's just that my parents knew that I hated being embarrassed, and that being told off in public was embarrassing.  So eventually, all Mum had to do was clear her throat, and that meant "that's wrong.  I won't tell you off if you stop now, but I will if you keep going", and I stopped, because I hated being told off.  Everyone thought Mum was the magic mother!
I guess it's finding what rewards and punishments work for your kids, really...and staying firm.  If my Mum had given in and not carried out threats, I probably wouldn't have listened to her half as often.

I must say that I find the My First Pagan sets highly amusing...Not because they wouldn't work, but because they would work so well!
Not knowing much about kids, I have to ask...would giving a child its own altar stop or discourage it from messing with one's own?  After a certain age, say three or so, can distinctions be made between "my altar" and "Mummy's altar" (or 'Daddy's altar'...)?
OOOH, OOOH!  Mix 'n' match DIY My First Altar kits!!  "Your altar can be Just Like Mummy's!!"
*ahem*.  Moment over.
Logged

Minds are like parachutes: Just because you've lost yours, doesn't mean you can borrow mine.

What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter as if he is a man, but when he is a spinning ball of ammonia and methane must be silent?
Star
Message Board Coordinator
Senior Staff
Grand Adept Member
****
Last Login:January 12, 2013, 08:36:08 am
United States United States

Religion: Hellenic Reconstructionist
TCN ID: star
Posts: 9033


Etcetera, Whatever

Blog entries (0)

ilaynay starcr
WWW
« Reply #40: October 19, 2010, 07:34:27 am »

Nope. I work in retail, I have to disagree. I do see the good ones. I actually comment to the parents when the kids say "Thank you" and "yes ma'am" and wait to talk so that they aren't interrupting. I definitely see the good ones. And I see the ones that are pitching fits that the parents don't tolerate-- like the ones who WILL leave the store that I work in, or that I am visiting, or are out in the park, whatever.  So, I see both-- but I see one a hell of a lot less than the other. 

Yeah, but...  Shadow's point still stands, I think:  It's not all about the parenting.  Kids are not machines that uniformly give the same response to any given stimulus.  There isn't some magic one-size-fits-all approach to parenting that will guarantee a perfect, well-behaved little angel of a child.

For that matter, parents themselves aren't automatons either--as adults we've got more control over our responses, but that doesn't mean that we're perfect.  Sometimes we mess up.  Sometimes we don't know what we're doing (kids don't come with an operator's manual, after all), and we're just trying to do our best, and that might not match up with your idea of what's best.  Sometimes we're still searching for the particular technique that is effective for our child in a given situation.  Sometimes we know we're not making the ideal choices from a disciplinary standpoint, but there are other factors that interfere with that.  (I have once or twice, for instance, rushed through the grocery shopping with a fussy child rather than walk out because I knew I would not get another chance to do the food shopping, and if I walked out we wouldn't have anything to eat that week.)  Sometimes the lesson being taught isn't "this is how you behave in a public place", but rather "you are not the only person whose opinion counts in this family, and we are not going home just because you'd rather watch Dora than go shopping"--which is important too.  None of that means that we're not enforcing discipline.  It means that we're human beings, and so are our kids.

I don't deny that there are parents who could use a backbone transplant.  As a parent who is trying but whose kid still acts up sometimes, though, it's really disturbing and frustrating to me to be lumped into the same group with those people who give in to their child's every whim just because my kid occasionally forgets her manners.
Logged

"The mystery of life is not a problem to be solved but a reality to be experienced."
-- Aart Van Der Leeuw

Main Blog:  Star's Journal of Random Thoughts
Religious Blog:  The Song and the Flame
I can also now be found on Goodreads.
Star
Message Board Coordinator
Senior Staff
Grand Adept Member
****
Last Login:January 12, 2013, 08:36:08 am
United States United States

Religion: Hellenic Reconstructionist
TCN ID: star
Posts: 9033


Etcetera, Whatever

Blog entries (0)

ilaynay starcr
WWW
« Reply #41: October 19, 2010, 07:39:13 am »

Not knowing much about kids, I have to ask...would giving a child its own altar stop or discourage it from messing with one's own?  After a certain age, say three or so, can distinctions be made between "my altar" and "Mummy's altar" (or 'Daddy's altar'...)?

My daughter's three.  She definitely has a concept of "mine" vs. "yours".  Sometimes she needs reminding that she shouldn't play with things that aren't her own, but...  Well, we've been playing the "I'll cook dinner in my kitchen, why don't you 'cook' dinner in your play kitchen?" game since, oh, last Christmas.  Every kid will be different, and probably you'll have to work with them a little bit to make sure the message sticks, but it's an approach that's definitely worth trying.

Of course, at three, she also understands the concept that she does not touch my shrine, even without having her own to play with.  ::shrug::
Logged

"The mystery of life is not a problem to be solved but a reality to be experienced."
-- Aart Van Der Leeuw

Main Blog:  Star's Journal of Random Thoughts
Religious Blog:  The Song and the Flame
I can also now be found on Goodreads.
Star
Message Board Coordinator
Senior Staff
Grand Adept Member
****
Last Login:January 12, 2013, 08:36:08 am
United States United States

Religion: Hellenic Reconstructionist
TCN ID: star
Posts: 9033


Etcetera, Whatever

Blog entries (0)

ilaynay starcr
WWW
« Reply #42: October 19, 2010, 07:50:37 am »

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line. 

I grew up terrified of my father, too.  I refuse to do that to my daughter if I can help it.  Respect, yes.  Fear, no.
Logged

"The mystery of life is not a problem to be solved but a reality to be experienced."
-- Aart Van Der Leeuw

Main Blog:  Star's Journal of Random Thoughts
Religious Blog:  The Song and the Flame
I can also now be found on Goodreads.
Marilyn (ABSENTMINDED)
Assistant Board Coordinator
Senior Staff
High Adept Member
****
Last Login:February 06, 2013, 08:12:28 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: free-flowing animist, Dudeist Priest
TCN ID: Absentminded
Posts: 2725


Blog entries (11)


« Reply #43: October 19, 2010, 08:23:27 am »

I was terrified of my father growing up, so I sure as HELL toed the line. 

Just as an example of the 'one size does not fit all' thing, I grew up with no fear whatsoever and still toed the line.

My parents were free spirits who sold the motorcycle when they started having kids (they debated just getting a sidecar but decided they would probably have more than one eventually).  They never raised their hands and seldom their voices.  They raised four kids and fourteen foster-kids whose biggest parent-related fears were of disappointing them.

We did not act up in stores because getting to go in the first place was such a rare treat we didn't want to get left home next time.  We said Mr. and Mrs. because only peers used first names.  We argued with courtesy because if we didn't our points would not be heard.  We were allowed to argue as soon as we could do it properly - until then we listened.  (my family are extremely wordy and opinionated)

Once only, when my brother had done something truly egregious, my father offered him the choice between being grounded or getting a spanking.  My brother chose the spanking and my poor father had to go through with it.  He was not a wimp - he was a trained commando and had served on a submarine chaser, and he was a bouncer when my mom met him.  Both of them could take care of themselves and had, but the idea of hitting one of their children made them physically ill.

A lot of people saw our family as some kind of hippy commune but we had the right combination of natures for it to work.  It was sheer luck - stricter discipline would not have improved us (and, being kids, we were monsters in our own ways) and laxer would not have ruined us.  Seeing us lined up in the grocery store getting to choose one kind of cereal each (a huge treat), the cashiers probably approved of the seeming strictness, and seeing the occasional public meltdown would have had them dismissing us as poorly parented.  Neither is an accurate picture - just a frozen snapshot from one perspective, and not enough to form a valid judgment from.

Absent
Logged

"There's nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won't cure."
- Jack E. Leonard

Blessed are the cracked, for it is they who let in the light.

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack, a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in

L Cohen
Satsekhem
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:October 16, 2011, 11:51:56 am
United States United States

Religion: Something? Somewhere?
Posts: 2991


I rock so hardcore.

Blog entries (0)

aubs.taylor
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #44: October 19, 2010, 08:39:57 am »

Just as an example of the 'one size does not fit all' thing, I grew up with no fear whatsoever and still toed the line.

My parents were free spirits who sold the motorcycle when they started having kids (they debated just getting a sidecar but decided they would probably have more than one eventually).  They never raised their hands and seldom their voices.  They raised four kids and fourteen foster-kids whose biggest parent-related fears were of disappointing them.

We did not act up in stores because getting to go in the first place was such a rare treat we didn't want to get left home next time.  We said Mr. and Mrs. because only peers used first names.  We argued with courtesy because if we didn't our points would not be heard.  We were allowed to argue as soon as we could do it properly - until then we listened.  (my family are extremely wordy and opinionated)

Once only, when my brother had done something truly egregious, my father offered him the choice between being grounded or getting a spanking.  My brother chose the spanking and my poor father had to go through with it.  He was not a wimp - he was a trained commando and had served on a submarine chaser, and he was a bouncer when my mom met him.  Both of them could take care of themselves and had, but the idea of hitting one of their children made them physically ill.

A lot of people saw our family as some kind of hippy commune but we had the right combination of natures for it to work.  It was sheer luck - stricter discipline would not have improved us (and, being kids, we were monsters in our own ways) and laxer would not have ruined us.  Seeing us lined up in the grocery store getting to choose one kind of cereal each (a huge treat), the cashiers probably approved of the seeming strictness, and seeing the occasional public meltdown would have had them dismissing us as poorly parented.  Neither is an accurate picture - just a frozen snapshot from one perspective, and not enough to form a valid judgment from.

Absent

Your parents sound pretty damn awesome.
Logged

Sekhemib-Nymaatre; spiritual blog.
Thanks For All the Fish; opinionated ranty blog.

I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I intended to be. - Douglas Adams

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
New Altar Pics
Magic and the Occult for Beginners
Herne 11 3431 Last post March 02, 2008, 08:33:47 pm
by Derg Corra
Don't have an altar? « 1 2 »
Non-Pagan Religions and Interfaith Discussions
Sperran 29 8672 Last post August 05, 2008, 10:29:11 am
by leigh137
Altar Problems: Open Floorplan and Small Children « 1 2 »
Paganism For Beginners
folksymama 24 7138 Last post April 15, 2008, 09:24:04 pm
by Aster Breo
How do I build an Altar « 1 2 »
Ta Hiera Hellenic Polytheism SIG
Joxer 20 7064 Last post February 01, 2009, 11:45:31 am
by Aetius
Your Altar
Worship and Ritual
Castus 8 3246 Last post November 28, 2010, 02:05:04 pm
by erinnightwalker
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.056 seconds with 53 queries.