The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
October 21, 2020, 02:51:31 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 21, 2020, 02:51:31 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: The existence of alien life and the consequences it might have on religion  (Read 9572 times)
Helmsman_of_Inepu
Master Member
****
Last Login:May 28, 2012, 07:22:37 am
United States United States

Religion: Kemetic Reconnaissance, Flamekeeping
Posts: 295


Blog entries (0)

Helmsman Of-Inepu
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #30: March 24, 2011, 07:54:32 pm »

Anyway, I thought I'd just throw this out there and let you all run with it.

I wonder if the Kemetics would say "Oh boy!!! More Gods! Let me at them!"  Smiley  The ancient Egyptians did add foreign Gods to their pantheon when they saw one they liked. Alexandria would have been even more likely to do this.

OTOH, we might all say "Stargate!?!!?!" and throw apotropaic wands at them.  Roll Eyes
Logged

Kemetic Writers Group - Fiction and Poetry - Join! Create! Have fun!
Kemetic Reconnaissance blog.
Adding in a bit of Flamekeeping too. (dark flame, bright flame)

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

Gwiwer
Apprentice
**
Last Login:May 12, 2011, 05:33:20 am
United States United States

Religion: unsure
Posts: 37

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #31: March 24, 2011, 09:19:45 pm »

  That's so interesting!  Thank you Spectacular.  This continues to become a more and more fascinating discussion.
  The notion of a sinless alien being begets original holiness, or perhaps for some races original unholiness.  It also brings to mind images of angelic beings with unusual abilities and appearances.  Sinless, intrinsically "holy" aliens?
  This is all a Christian context of course.

You're reading too much into that. The doctrine of Original Sin is that all human beings inherited a sinful nature from Adam and Eve when they disobeyed God in the Garden of Eden and ate the fruit from The Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. Most Christians, including Catholics, believe that this event is what fundamentally made it necessary for God to intervene and have Jesus be crucified to pay for our sinful nature vicariously for us. Being baptized into Christianity removes Original Sin from the believer through the redemptive power of Jesus' sacrifice. It doesn't mean they're now perfectly sinless, it just means they've been redeemed from the sinful nature they were born with as a consequence of the Fall of Man when Adam and Eve ate the fruit. What this person at the Vatican is essentially probably saying is that, since intelligent life elsewhere in the universe would not be human, they would not be tainted with Original Sin and would not need Jesus to redeem them. That doesn't mean he thinks they would be sinless. It just means that Christianity wouldn't apply to them and so it's pretty irrelevant what their religious beliefs are or if they've ever even heard of Jesus somehow.

Interesting. I really never thought about whether or not Original Sin would apply to aliens before and what consequences there would be either way, but that is exactly the sort of discussion I was hoping to generate by creating this thread. It's kind of an enlightening idea and makes me completely re-evaluate my thoughts about Christianity having a tough time adjusting to the concept of alien life. It might be much easier for them than I imagined, at least those denominations that believe in Original Sin, anyway.
Logged
son of dhamma
Permanently Banned
Journeyman
***
Last Login:April 12, 2011, 10:06:37 am
United States United States

Religion: -
Posts: 113

Blog entries (4)



Ignore
« Reply #32: March 24, 2011, 10:17:27 pm »

You're reading too much into that. The doctrine of Original Sin is that all human beings inherited a sinful nature from Adam and Eve when they disobeyed God in the Garden of Eden and ate the fruit from The Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil...

...  Interesting. I really never thought about whether or not Original Sin would apply to aliens before and what consequences there would be either way, but that is exactly the sort of discussion I was hoping to generate by creating this thread. It's kind of an enlightening idea and makes me completely re-evaluate my thoughts about Christianity having a tough time adjusting to the concept of alien life. It might be much easier for them than I imagined, at least those denominations that believe in Original Sin, anyway.

  Wouldn't that mean that human-intelligent aliens who had not originally disobeyed God in their Creationistic "Garden" by eating from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, would not have fallen into any sinful ways at all?  Wouldn't they have retained their original sinlessness and thus remained perfectly "human"?
  What about the denominations who do not believe in Original Sin?
Logged

-
Drgong
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:March 28, 2011, 05:36:10 pm
United States United States

Religion: LDS -- "Mormon"
Posts: 82


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #33: March 24, 2011, 10:24:09 pm »


I'm being a little silly, I guess, but that's not out of disrespect or anything. I just don't really see how the whole system would work without some sort of force higher than God dictating things like some kind of Supreme Force, karma, fate, or even a higher god that rules over all of the other gods. What if the god of the planet you get stuck on is a total jerk who just sends everyone on his planet to his version of hell because he still hasn't gotten over the fact that people on the planet he used to live on used to pick on him in high-school?

Don't get me wrong though, it's certainly an intriguing concept and I definitely appreciate you sharing a little overview of it here. It's something I'm certainly going to look into more. It's kind of hard to come by materials that talk about it in any even-handed way. Most of what you find on the internet is just Christian sites criticizing the doctrine as being evil and un-Christian and such, so I'm sure that I don't have a completely accurate understanding of it. 

It is not a silly question.   We know that Heavenly father set the rules,  in fact, one of the basic concepts was there was a debate among the children how this would happen, Jesus said give each person free will, Satan wanted to force us into becoming that status.

As for who made the rules for heavenly father, one would assume it was HIS heavenly father, but we really do not know.  As a note, Mormons also do not buy into the whole "original sin" concept.   So anyone who is mentally unable to make choices or dies before the age of eight is automatically getting all the rewards of heaven.  

"Adam fell that men might be; and men care, that they might have joy."  - So we think that the fall was essential to humanity progressing and being well...human..
Logged

This is a gentle reminder to myself, by the god(s) remember to leave a quote to what you are replying to.   This board prefers quoting.
Drgong
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:March 28, 2011, 05:36:10 pm
United States United States

Religion: LDS -- "Mormon"
Posts: 82


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #34: March 24, 2011, 10:26:43 pm »

  So, on this topic, does this doctrine then imply that alien creatures of high intelligence may have their own godparents but there is one godhead to govern all of them?  Do these planets end simultaneously or is there a continuing cycle of gods moving on to new planets?

It generally thought when a world is created, that a god is the one who is forming and creating the life on it.    However no one who been on the earth (except perhaps the handful of translated beings) has become a god except for Jesus.   
Logged

This is a gentle reminder to myself, by the god(s) remember to leave a quote to what you are replying to.   This board prefers quoting.
son of dhamma
Permanently Banned
Journeyman
***
Last Login:April 12, 2011, 10:06:37 am
United States United States

Religion: -
Posts: 113

Blog entries (4)



Ignore
« Reply #35: March 24, 2011, 10:52:56 pm »

It is not a silly question.   We know that Heavenly father set the rules,  in fact, one of the basic concepts was there was a debate among the children how this would happen, Jesus said give each person free will, Satan wanted to force us into becoming that status.

  Does this suggest that alien life then might not have free will, if their godhead did not agree to it?  Does this also mean that not all worlds have beings in Satan's position, and that some have more than one?
Logged

-
son of dhamma
Permanently Banned
Journeyman
***
Last Login:April 12, 2011, 10:06:37 am
United States United States

Religion: -
Posts: 113

Blog entries (4)



Ignore
« Reply #36: March 24, 2011, 10:55:12 pm »

It generally thought when a world is created, that a god is the one who is forming and creating the life on it.    However no one who been on the earth (except perhaps the handful of translated beings) has become a god except for Jesus.   

  So, therefore conventional people such as you and myself cannot become godheads, merely like God?  On the other hand, Jesus attained full godhood and has earned his own planet?
  This is incredibly fascinating.
Logged

-
Drgong
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:March 28, 2011, 05:36:10 pm
United States United States

Religion: LDS -- "Mormon"
Posts: 82


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #37: March 24, 2011, 11:15:53 pm »

  So, therefore conventional people such as you and myself cannot become godheads, merely like God?  On the other hand, Jesus attained full godhood and has earned his own planet?
  This is incredibly fascinating.

Well, we can be like God, which may be that we are the heavenly father (or mother)of the godhead - we don't know how others work, just how it works on earth.

Jesus does not have is own planet - he took the role of being the savior and atoned for our sins. It gets complicated, as I am trying to each Mormonism 432 to someone who may or may not know Mormonism 101...
Logged

This is a gentle reminder to myself, by the god(s) remember to leave a quote to what you are replying to.   This board prefers quoting.
WhiteSong
Apprentice
**
Last Login:July 16, 2011, 12:23:12 am
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
Posts: 38

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #38: March 26, 2011, 10:39:16 am »

Recently, I've been pondering what sort of consequences the existence of intelligent alien life might have for our understanding of religion here on Earth.

I think that the strictly monotheistic faiths like Judaism, Christianity, and Islam will be thoroughly harmed by the discovery of intelligent life on other planets. After all, these religions teach that, though God is an all-pervasive cosmic force that exists every where in the universe, Earth and human beings are distinctly special.

On the other hand, religions like the various Neo-Pagan movements, Hinduism, and such focus on local manifestations of spiritual forces that theoretically could be broadened out to include other places within the universe. After all, if the Celtic gods developed here on Earth, there's nothing to say that local gods couldn't have developed uniquely on other planets



I agree that some religions would have trouble dealing with extraterrestrial life--because it would be difficult to place aliens within the established hierarchy of nature, humans, and God.

Mel Gibson made a Christian themed (in my interpretation) film about aliens invading the earth--and it all turns out OK, because God is watching over his herd of poor, helpless sheep (*edit: No offense to Christianity, but the aliens were "harvesting" the humans--so the analogy fits. And the tone of that sentence is because I didn't like the movie, not because I am trying to be offensive to a particular religion). It's called "Signs." In the story, he dealt with the issue of extraterrestrials by making his aliens monsters, and aligning them against God, which might place them somewhere in the realm of demons or animals in the Christian mythology.

Another interesting thing to think about, is that humans have actually lived alongside the, similarly intelligent, Neanderthal. Since the neanderthals disappeared, we've gotten to take center stage as the only animal species who can create sophisticated technology, and have religion. But it wasn't so for early humans--and that must have been reflected in their religions.

 Perhaps these early peoples' religions didn't emphasize the hierarchy of species so much.   Its fun to hypothesize that the emergence of religions which place humans above other living things, and below God, might be due to the disappearance (or absorbing) of neanderthals--which might have boosted a collective human ego.  
« Last Edit: March 26, 2011, 10:53:11 am by WhiteSong, Reason: To make sure I wasn\'t being offensive » Logged
Gwiwer
Apprentice
**
Last Login:May 12, 2011, 05:33:20 am
United States United States

Religion: unsure
Posts: 37

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #39: March 26, 2011, 08:53:06 pm »


I agree that some religions would have trouble dealing with extraterrestrial life--because it would be difficult to place aliens within the established hierarchy of nature, humans, and God.

Mel Gibson made a Christian themed (in my interpretation) film about aliens invading the earth--and it all turns out OK, because God is watching over his herd of poor, helpless sheep (*edit: No offense to Christianity, but the aliens were "harvesting" the humans--so the analogy fits. And the tone of that sentence is because I didn't like the movie, not because I am trying to be offensive to a particular religion). It's called "Signs." In the story, he dealt with the issue of extraterrestrials by making his aliens monsters, and aligning them against God, which might place them somewhere in the realm of demons or animals in the Christian mythology.

Another interesting thing to think about, is that humans have actually lived alongside the, similarly intelligent, Neanderthal. Since the neanderthals disappeared, we've gotten to take center stage as the only animal species who can create sophisticated technology, and have religion. But it wasn't so for early humans--and that must have been reflected in their religions.

 Perhaps these early peoples' religions didn't emphasize the hierarchy of species so much.   Its fun to hypothesize that the emergence of religions which place humans above other living things, and below God, might be due to the disappearance (or absorbing) of neanderthals--which might have boosted a collective human ego.  


The movie Signs was written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan who was born Hindu and, apparently, is still a Hindu, so I'm not sure I would necessarily jump to the conclusion that it was intended to be specifically seen as a Christian movie, but more of a movie about religion, luck, and fate in general. Considering his other films, it's probably pretty difficult to read too much into any of the films he makes since his focus appears to be almost exclusively on coming up with twist endings that, as far as I could tell, don't seem to support any coherent ideology or philosophy. Some like Signs, The Sixth Sense, and Devil seem supportive of spiritual topics while others like The Village and The Happening seem to favor a much more pessimistic view of reality. Though he often incorporates supernatural elements into his films, I'm not too sure one can necessarily deduce from them any coherent set of beliefs. Due to Mel Gibson's religious beliefs, I have no doubt that he probably views Signs as a Christian movie for the most part, which probably explains why he decided to take the role, but he didn't write it or direct it so his particular beliefs are fairly irrelevant.

Likewise, I'm not so sure one could ever really know too much about how the disappearance of the neanderthal really effected our species one way or the other. We're not even sure what sort of relationship human beings and neanderthals had with each other. The general consensus for decades was that both groups were at odds with one another and an intense rivalry developed between them, but modern sciences including, but not limited to, genetics seem to paint a much more complex picture of the interactions between humans and neanderthals. It's not even clear if human beings understood the neanderthals to be a rival species or simply considered them to be other human beings. Even modern scientists are torn about just how human neanderthals would have been. Some scientists like prominent paleoanthropologist Erik Trinkaus don't even believe neanderthals actually went extinct, but that they actually became absorbed into European and Asian populations of humans. Up to 4% of European and Asian DNA is pre-modern and identical to neanderthal DNA, but does not show up at all in the DNA of people from sub-Saharan Africa. The reasons for this are unknown. Trinkaus and many scientists conclude it is because humans and neanderthals interbred considerably and subsequent populations of Europeans and Asians were essentially human and neanderthal hybrids. This would explain why neanderthals suddenly disappear from the fossil records about 25,000 years ago. They didn't go extinct, they just became absorbed into the human populations from that point on. Short of cloning some neanderthals, we'll probably never know for sure.
Logged
WhiteSong
Apprentice
**
Last Login:July 16, 2011, 12:23:12 am
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
Posts: 38

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #40: March 27, 2011, 12:35:57 pm »

The movie Signs was written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan who was born Hindu and, apparently, is still a Hindu, so I'm not sure I would necessarily jump to the conclusion that it was intended to be specifically seen as a Christian movie, but more of a movie about religion, luck, and fate in general.  Though he often incorporates supernatural elements into his films, I'm not too sure one can necessarily deduce from them any coherent set of beliefs. Due to Mel Gibson's religious beliefs, I have no doubt that he probably views Signs as a Christian movie for the most part, which probably explains why he decided to take the role, but he didn't write it or direct it so his particular beliefs are fairly irrelevant.

Likewise, I'm not so sure one could ever really know too much about how the disappearance of the neanderthal really effected our species one way or the other. We're not even sure what sort of relationship human beings and neanderthals had with each other. The general consensus for decades was that both groups were at odds with one another and an intense rivalry developed between them, but modern sciences including, but not limited to, genetics seem to paint a much more complex picture of the interactions between humans and neanderthals. It's not even clear if human beings understood the neanderthals to be a rival species or simply considered them to be other human beings. Even modern scientists are torn about just how human neanderthals would have been.

 Up to 4% of European and Asian DNA is pre-modern and identical to neanderthal DNA, but does not show up at all in the DNA of people from sub-Saharan Africa. The reasons for this are unknown. Trinkaus and many scientists conclude it is because humans and neanderthals interbred considerably and subsequent populations of Europeans and Asians were essentially human and neanderthal hybrids. This would explain why neanderthals suddenly disappear from the fossil records about 25,000 years ago. They didn't go extinct, they just became absorbed into the human populations from that point on. Short of cloning some neanderthals, we'll probably never know for sure.

Thanks for correcting me about the director. I tend to overgeneralize, and I really don't follow films or stars too much. I agree that, as an actor, Mel Gibson's personal views would be irrelevant. However, although the director may not have been Christian, he probably did consider the way that his movies would be seen by his audience, which is not all Hindu. Probably, my reading of the film is colored by my own experience, growing up in a mostly-Christian society.

I know that there are a lot of unanswered questions about neanderthals. And if they really were another "race" of humans, then the relationship between neanderthals and homo sapiens would simply be an early example of two ethnic populations interacting --which there are many more examples of, that are better documented.  I am glad that the study of neanderthals seems to be revealing interesting data. I read in a National Geographic article that the gene which is associated with red hair in humans was found in neanderthal DNA. Neanderthals were concentrated in Eurasia, and so the fairer pigmentation would be an advantage to them (allowing them to get enough vitamin D), but not to humans in the sunnier regions of Africa, who would suffer more health complications with fairer skin. If neanderthals were already genetically acclimated to the northern climate--then their interbreeding with the migrating Africans might have helped introduce and spread the fair-skinned traits that are useful for the northern European climate. That might considerably speed up the acquisition of these desirable traits, because the migrating Africans would not have to take generations of evolutionary mutations and culling, if the mutant genes could be introduced into the population in only a few generations.  This is all complete speculation--and it can't be taken seriously because I am not a biologist. It's also off topic. I agree that we will probably never have a very clear idea of the complex relationships between neanderthals and early humans. 

Considering how different religions might deal with extraterrestrials is difficult, because I tend to want to look at past historical examples, and my knowledge is mostly limited to stuff I inadvertently picked up about Christianity in Europe during the medieval period, when there was a lot of debate about what women were, and what their purpose was.  But women are different than aliens, in that they are mentioned in the bible, whereas aliens don't seem to be explicitly mentioned.  Women were commonly viewed as flawed men, and at best, they were seen as being "man's helpmate" by giving birth to children.  The bible also supports that women should be subservient to men, and lower on the hierarchy than men, in other passages.

Looking at the way that Native Americans and African slaves were placed in subordinate positions is harder, because I am not clear about the role of the church in these efforts to play-down the humanity of these ethnic groups, and how the church interacted with the obvious economical incentives to de-humanize these people. 

But all these examples would be different than aliens, because aliens would automatically be considered un-human, by biological standards. So all the arguments that went towards causing women and other ethnicities to seem inhuman would not be necessary for extraterrestrials. Also, neither women, Native Americans, nor African slaves, were considered technologically advanced to the dominant group of white male Christians that I am considering; whereas aliens would be more technologically advanced than humans, at least in space travel. 

Plus, maybe considering how earlier Churches fit intelligent beings, like women and non-whites, into the hierarchy isn't so illuminating---because religions and people have changed since then.

Logged
livrelcote
Senior Newbie
*
Last Login:April 13, 2011, 10:53:04 am
Canada Canada

Religion: trial and error
Posts: 9

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #41: April 01, 2011, 09:13:19 pm »

I'm new here, but this caught my eye immediately. 

As for the monostheistic outlook of the Old testament, I'm reminded of a few verses in Genesis regarding the existance of other god's, while this is in context coming from the villain in the garden of eden: 
3:4-5 And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die: For God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil.
(I can go on endless tangents here, but to stay on context:)
3:22 And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:

From these verses of the old testament, both the serpent and the one called God are acknowledging the presence of more than one, the use of us.

And for the gospel's monotheism with Jesus as the focal point for their worship or salvation, also acknowledging the presence of multiple God's by implication:
John 10:34 Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods?

So, I guess this may include both earthbound creatures, humans, being called gods (as is apparently real through studies of Egyptian history), along with beings who are beyond human mortality being called God(s).  But in any case it does appear that there is more than one.

I understand some religions to have conceptions of a Universal consciousness, some may refer to as a blind idiot god of chaos, others as a being who stablized the platforms upon which chaos ensues, existant within an eternal host, conceptually this may be collectively called reality, belief in an intelligent creator who 'hung the stars from nothing' as can be considered real since space doesn't appear to be made of a physical fabric, instead hosting all physical fabrics.  Whatever God(s) or entities may exist within this tapestry is left to the mind to wonder, or for to reveal themselves and be accepted by the witness as being evidently real.

I haven't studied Islam very deeply, but to consider this verse, among others:
Surat 14:35 And [mention, O Muhammad], when Abraham said, "My Lord, make this city [Makkah] secure and keep me and my sons away from worshipping idols.

By implication it would appear that they would inherit the same conclusions drawn from the Old and New testaments, if it were considered logically.

Onto extraterrestrial life-forms.  While I agree that in the infinity of thought, (possibly) infinite possibilities within the Universe and through scientific speculation and idle reasoning/drawing of conclusions as philosophy, these unearthly beings (not of this earth) are possible to exist, as more or less advanced of a physical being than humans.  There's also the book the demonology by king james to consider, and how he considers the spiritual entities that exist externally to humans capable of performing several tasks.  While he may have been a bit of a heretic in his said historic actions, what he does consider is something to consider as well.  How for instance, the devil may (in his considerations) draw even the intellectual inquisitive people into the tools of the occult through use of his angels (the devils angels in this context) - maybe taking the form of a alienoid lifeform, either within the mind or within reality, projecting images that defy understood human boundaries but could be contextually possible in light of these alien speculations.  Taking man's fanatacism through a grand deception for instance.  (This is sort of a vice view on alien encounters, using one of many considerations, not authoritative in any way, mere speculation).

Now, onto conscious deceptive social engineering possibilities, in light of the use of the word alien in the bible:

Job 19:13 “He has alienated my family from me; my acquaintances are completely estranged from me.

Isaiah 28:21 The LORD will rise up as he did at Mount Perazim, he will rouse himself as in the Valley of Gibeon— to do his work, his strange work, and perform his task, his alien task.

Galatians 4:17 Those people are zealous to win you over, but for no good. What they want is to alienate you from us, so that you may have zeal for them.

Galatians 5:4 You who are trying to be justified by the law have been alienated from Christ; you have fallen away from grace.

Colossians 1:21 Once you were alienated from God and were enemies in your minds because of your evil behavior.

Deuteronomy 14:21 Ye shall not eat of any thing that dieth of itself: thou shalt give it unto the stranger that is in thy gates, that he may eat it; or thou mayest sell it unto an alien: for thou art an holy people unto the Lord thy God. Thou shalt not seethe a kid in his mother's milk.

Hebrews 11:34 Quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to flight the armies of the aliens.

There are plenty uses and contexts of the word alien in the bible.  I think in this case it can be seen to mean foreigner.


Anyways, I will continue reading this thread through and cross my fingers that I didn't repost somebody elses post.  These are just some things I consider regarding aliens.
Logged

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Planes of existence « 1 2 3 »
Philosophy and Metaphysics
Juniper 35 13840 Last post March 22, 2011, 09:31:28 pm
by son of dhamma
The consequences of following your path...
Faith in Everyday Life
Waldfrau 13 6384 Last post October 21, 2008, 12:53:47 am
by RhiannonWhiteMare
Wicca and the existence of creatures most would think are mythological?
Magic and the Occult for Beginners
omera 7 3087 Last post September 29, 2009, 05:19:37 pm
by SunflowerP
What role should religion play in a modern life? « 1 2 »
Philosophy and Metaphysics
BGMarc 28 9869 Last post November 16, 2009, 10:44:51 am
by Rowanfox
consequences, and when things go wrong or not as planned. « 1 2 3 »
Chaos Magic
Syncearae 31 12644 Last post January 18, 2011, 02:53:49 pm
by Syncearae
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.066 seconds with 44 queries.