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Author Topic: Preparing Dogs for Vet Appts?  (Read 4617 times)
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« Topic Start: May 19, 2011, 09:26:11 pm »

My two rescue dogs (hubby and I too, really) had a horrible experience at the vet's office this week when I took them in for their yearly visit.  My husband was furious with the vet when we left and we've decided to transfer them to a different office next year.  I was hoping for some suggestions on things we can do to help better prepare the dogs and hopefully have a visit that doesn't resemble a three ring circus as much. 

Some context: We have an 80lb black lab named Sadie who is very friendly, but also excitable and needs time to calm down when she's encountering new people or situations.  We also have a 110lb shepherd mix named Teddy who has a lot of issues from being starved and abused at his previous home.  He's sweet natured, but also extremely jumpy and nervous. 

They both listen to basic commands, walk on a leash well, and will let us handle their heads and feet when they're relaxed, but they turn into a pair of crazies when we go to the vet, who is...odd, really, with animals.  He refers to people's animals as "the dog" or "the cat", I've never heard him use their names with ours or anyone else's.  He doesn't talk to the animals or touch them save for administering medication.  He has no vet techs so we have to do everything and he gets very impatient when our dogs are frightened and struggling- no treats or pets or praise, he just wants them restrained or sedated so he can move on to the next patient. 

If you have a calm pet I'm sure he's an OK vet, but our dogs get more upset with each appointment and it's physically difficult to handle almost 200lbs of dog when they're worked up into a panic.  I've tried to explain that Teddy in particular is fearful of strangers and after three years of living with us still startles if you stand up too fast or make a loud noise.  He can't be tied to anything because he'll scream and thrash to the point of hurting himself.  He's not a typical dog and I don't think it's realistic to expect him to act like one, especially if you're not using a very soft hand with him.  The vet just looks at me like I'm retarded when I tell him this and repeats that if we just trained him better, he'd be fine.   Angry

That said, I know that as far as we've come there is still plenty of room for improvement.  If anyone has tips on exercises we can do with them or suggestions for what to look for in a vet while we shop around that'd be great.  I don't mind muzzling for safety reasons and we've tried sedatives out of desperation, but I'd love to get them better prepared for their check-ups.  Someone suggested trips to a local groomer with a good reputation for being patient with nervous dogs as practice, what do you think? 
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« Reply #1: May 19, 2011, 10:02:52 pm »

They both listen to basic commands, walk on a leash well, and will let us handle their heads and feet when they're relaxed, but they turn into a pair of crazies when we go to the vet, who is...odd, really, with animals.  He refers to people's animals as "the dog" or "the cat", I've never heard him use their names with ours or anyone else's.  He doesn't talk to the animals or touch them save for administering medication.  He has no vet techs so we have to do everything and he gets very impatient when our dogs are frightened and struggling- no treats or pets or praise, he just wants them restrained or sedated so he can move on to the next patient.

Your dogs don't sound like they are much of the problem. The vet sounds like he is most of the problem. And no, I would not consider him an "okay vet" even for calm animals. He wouldn't be my vet unless I had no other choice.  From your description, "odd with animals" should be "bad with animals".

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« Reply #2: May 19, 2011, 10:42:07 pm »

Your dogs don't sound like they are much of the problem. The vet sounds like he is most of the problem. And no, I would not consider him an "okay vet" even for calm animals. He wouldn't be my vet unless I had no other choice.  From your description, "odd with animals" should be "bad with animals".

Funny thing is, I was referred to him by some people who were very satisfied with his services and his office is busy so I guess some people like him, but hubby and I agreed that he's not the right vet for our dogs.  Every year has gotten worse and I just can't put them through that again- I feel pretty horrible for staying with that office as long as we did.  Hopefully we can find a vet with a better approach to frightened pets for their next visit.   Undecided
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« Reply #3: May 19, 2011, 10:50:34 pm »

Your dogs don't sound like they are much of the problem. The vet sounds like he is most of the problem. And no, I would not consider him an "okay vet" even for calm animals. He wouldn't be my vet unless I had no other choice.  From your description, "odd with animals" should be "bad with animals".



I agree. it took a few tries with with mine. I have a rescued dog and a blind cat. I prefer to take them together and so does the cat  Smiley The best thing to do is not make a big deal about going to the vet. I just say we are going for a jeep ride and we go. Both of my girls love going for rides in the jeep!  When you find a vet that you like you will know. You can ask to meet the vet without having an appointment just like in a dr's office. Most will let you bring in one of your dogs to meet them. Ask around at a dog park or in Petsmart/Petco. Most people in those stores will be honest and will give good references. Good luck.
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« Reply #4: May 19, 2011, 11:09:25 pm »

Funny thing is, I was referred to him by some people who were very satisfied with his services and his office is busy so I guess some people like him, but hubby and I agreed that he's not the right vet for our dogs.  Every year has gotten worse and I just can't put them through that again- I feel pretty horrible for staying with that office as long as we did.  Hopefully we can find a vet with a better approach to frightened pets for their next visit.   Undecided

Finding a good vet is a nightmare.

Randall can tell you that until we fostered Elvis, we'd really never found a vet here in Waco. I thought maybe one vet was going to work out (he was the third one we'd tried four years), but the vet the shelter uses is one of the best vets I've ever used (and in 30 years, I can count those on one hand).

There were only two in Dallas that I was satisfied with...and that was in 17 years.

My suggestion is take treats with you. Something your guys really like, and be liberal with them. Make it as positive and rewarding an experience as you can. No dog likes a vet clinic, but you can help jolly them along...and pay attention to the office staff and techs. They can make or break a clinic.
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« Reply #5: May 20, 2011, 12:42:33 am »

Your dogs don't sound like they are much of the problem. The vet sounds like he is most of the problem. And no, I would not consider him an "okay vet" even for calm animals. He wouldn't be my vet unless I had no other choice.  From your description, "odd with animals" should be "bad with animals".
<nodnodnod> There were several things in there that struck me as indicators that this guy wouldn't be a really good fit for any animal patients.  Good at the purely technical aspects, maybe; a good fit for some owners, maybe (though I'm a bit iffy about owners who think the fit with them is more important than the fit with the pets) - but, honestly, this guy sounds like he doesn't even like animals much.

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« Reply #6: May 20, 2011, 01:27:36 pm »

My two rescue dogs (hubby and I too, really) had a horrible experience at the vet's office this week when I took them in for their yearly visit.  My husband was furious with the vet when we left and we've decided to transfer them to a different office next year.  I was hoping for some suggestions on things we can do to help better prepare the dogs and hopefully have a visit that doesn't resemble a three ring circus as much. 

Some context: We have an 80lb black lab named Sadie who is very friendly, but also excitable and needs time to calm down when she's encountering new people or situations.  We also have a 110lb shepherd mix named Teddy who has a lot of issues from being starved and abused at his previous home.  He's sweet natured, but also extremely jumpy and nervous. 

They both listen to basic commands, walk on a leash well, and will let us handle their heads and feet when they're relaxed, but they turn into a pair of crazies when we go to the vet, who is...odd, really, with animals.  He refers to people's animals as "the dog" or "the cat", I've never heard him use their names with ours or anyone else's.  He doesn't talk to the animals or touch them save for administering medication.  He has no vet techs so we have to do everything and he gets very impatient when our dogs are frightened and struggling- no treats or pets or praise, he just wants them restrained or sedated so he can move on to the next patient. 

If you have a calm pet I'm sure he's an OK vet, but our dogs get more upset with each appointment and it's physically difficult to handle almost 200lbs of dog when they're worked up into a panic.  I've tried to explain that Teddy in particular is fearful of strangers and after three years of living with us still startles if you stand up too fast or make a loud noise.  He can't be tied to anything because he'll scream and thrash to the point of hurting himself.  He's not a typical dog and I don't think it's realistic to expect him to act like one, especially if you're not using a very soft hand with him.  The vet just looks at me like I'm retarded when I tell him this and repeats that if we just trained him better, he'd be fine.   Angry

That said, I know that as far as we've come there is still plenty of room for improvement.  If anyone has tips on exercises we can do with them or suggestions for what to look for in a vet while we shop around that'd be great.  I don't mind muzzling for safety reasons and we've tried sedatives out of desperation, but I'd love to get them better prepared for their check-ups.  Someone suggested trips to a local groomer with a good reputation for being patient with nervous dogs as practice, what do you think? 


Finding a good vet is hard. They all have different ideas about how to practice their medicine. My suggestion is ask the local spca (or your version of a shelter) for a name of a good vet because they are usually the ones that need a good vet more often. When you go in with a Vet, watch how he talk, act, and handles your dogs and if he isnt treating them with the same kindness an caring you would expect of a child then they arent right for you. But for the dogs, my suggestion is this. Exercise them before you go so they are alittle worn out and all the excess energy is used up. Take treats for good behavior and if you find they are getting worked up, try distancing yourself from the other people and animals in the room because your dogs could be feeding off your tense energy and the energy of the surrounding pets. And if all else fails to calm them, sit on the floor with them for cuddle time because they will be reassured if you are calm and ok.
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« Reply #7: May 20, 2011, 06:30:13 pm »

I agree. it took a few tries with with mine. I have a rescued dog and a blind cat. I prefer to take them together and so does the cat  Smiley The best thing to do is not make a big deal about going to the vet. I just say we are going for a jeep ride and we go. Both of my girls love going for rides in the jeep!  When you find a vet that you like you will know. You can ask to meet the vet without having an appointment just like in a dr's office. Most will let you bring in one of your dogs to meet them. Ask around at a dog park or in Petsmart/Petco. Most people in those stores will be honest and will give good references. Good luck.


Thank you for the suggestions!  My dogs enjoy riding in our Jeep too, which I think helps them get over the experience when we leave.  I'll start asking around for vet recommendations and see if we can stop by for a visit to get a feel for the atmosphere, that's a good idea.  Smiley
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« Reply #8: May 20, 2011, 06:48:29 pm »

Finding a good vet is a nightmare.

Randall can tell you that until we fostered Elvis, we'd really never found a vet here in Waco. I thought maybe one vet was going to work out (he was the third one we'd tried four years), but the vet the shelter uses is one of the best vets I've ever used (and in 30 years, I can count those on one hand).

There were only two in Dallas that I was satisfied with...and that was in 17 years.

My suggestion is take treats with you. Something your guys really like, and be liberal with them. Make it as positive and rewarding an experience as you can. No dog likes a vet clinic, but you can help jolly them along...and pay attention to the office staff and techs. They can make or break a clinic.

Yikes, with all of your dog experience and you've only found a handful of good vets?  I might have my work cut out for me.  I'm definitely hearing that shelters and rescues have a good handle on local vets so I'll have to ask.  Today I got a suggestion from a co-worker who has three high-maintenance dogs and is super-fussy about their care.  I can't imagine her putting up with even a mediocre vet so this office might be a place to start. 

I'll be honest that I often get flustered from being rushed through the appointment and forget to give them treats until they're so upset they won't eat.    Embarrassed  Thank you, I'll have to remember to start the treats early and keep them coming throughout the visit. 
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« Reply #9: May 20, 2011, 07:02:52 pm »

<nodnodnod> There were several things in there that struck me as indicators that this guy wouldn't be a really good fit for any animal patients.  Good at the purely technical aspects, maybe; a good fit for some owners, maybe (though I'm a bit iffy about owners who think the fit with them is more important than the fit with the pets) - but, honestly, this guy sounds like he doesn't even like animals much.

Sunflower

He really doesn't come across as an animal-lover, no.  I don't have a lot of experience with vets, having grown up with a pet pig who saw a large animal vet when we boarded him at a potbellied pig farm each summer.  I had someone ask why the vet techs didn't help handle the dogs, but there are no vet techs and they found this really strange.  I have little idea of what to look for or expect in a vet's office, which probably sounds stupid.  Professional help handling my nervous babies?  That'd be fantastic.
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« Reply #10: May 20, 2011, 07:06:03 pm »


Finding a good vet is hard. They all have different ideas about how to practice their medicine. My suggestion is ask the local spca (or your version of a shelter) for a name of a good vet because they are usually the ones that need a good vet more often. When you go in with a Vet, watch how he talk, act, and handles your dogs and if he isnt treating them with the same kindness an caring you would expect of a child then they arent right for you. But for the dogs, my suggestion is this. Exercise them before you go so they are alittle worn out and all the excess energy is used up. Take treats for good behavior and if you find they are getting worked up, try distancing yourself from the other people and animals in the room because your dogs could be feeding off your tense energy and the energy of the surrounding pets. And if all else fails to calm them, sit on the floor with them for cuddle time because they will be reassured if you are calm and ok.

Thank you for all of the helpful suggestions.   Smiley  I had never thought about exercising them before the appointment, I'll have to try that on our next trip somewhere and see if it makes a significant difference. 
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« Reply #11: May 20, 2011, 08:31:45 pm »

Yikes, with all of your dog experience and you've only found a handful of good vets?  I might have my work cut out for me. 

There's something else at play here, though. Since I bred/showed, I've got a really high expectation of what I want in a vet, and I don't put up with much bullshit (that's why I mentioned the staff...the vet might be fine, but that staff can kill a practice; I've actually pulled a dog of an exam table and walked out over a vet tech. ). I've also found over the years that most vets do NOT like to work with those of us who breed and show. I suspect there's a "god complex" that comes in to play. This is something I know virtually every dog show person has been through. It's always hard to find a vet you can work with.

Quote
I'm definitely hearing that shelters and rescues have a good handle on local vets so I'll have to ask.  Today I got a suggestion from a co-worker who has three high-maintenance dogs and is super-fussy about their care.  I can't imagine her putting up with even a mediocre vet so this office might be a place to start. 

All you can do is try. Sometimes you get lucky (I got lucky with my second vet in Dallas and my last) and find one right away. Other times, well, it can be a long, hard search.

Quote
I'll be honest that I often get flustered from being rushed through the appointment and forget to give them treats until they're so upset they won't eat.    Embarrassed  Thank you, I'll have to remember to start the treats early and keep them coming throughout the visit. 

Just shoot for the waiting room for the majority of it. Once you get an animal in an exam room, you're generally too busy for treats. But while you're waiting and after you're done? Treats are good.
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« Reply #12: May 21, 2011, 07:34:08 pm »


Finding a good vet is hard. They all have different ideas about how to practice their medicine. My suggestion is ask the local spca (or your version of a shelter) for a name of a good vet because they are usually the ones that need a good vet more often. When you go in with a Vet, watch how he talk, act, and handles your dogs and if he isnt treating them with the same kindness an caring you would expect of a child then they arent right for you. But for the dogs, my suggestion is this. Exercise them before you go so they are alittle worn out and all the excess energy is used up. Take treats for good behavior and if you find they are getting worked up, try distancing yourself from the other people and animals in the room because your dogs could be feeding off your tense energy and the energy of the surrounding pets. And if all else fails to calm them, sit on the floor with them for cuddle time because they will be reassured if you are calm and ok.

I always like to take my dog for a good run before she goes anywhere, especially when she was younger. Of course, that dog had so much energy she was still crazy, but it was better than had I brought her in without doing that. These days, we're okay at the vet without just because she's less energetic and they're so patient with her and willing to change from their normal procedures to make her more comfortable. I also bring some of her favorite treats so I can get her focused if she's getting worked up by something going on - she's very food-motivated, however and would most likely ignore an intruder for a good treat. But if she gets out of control, all I have to do is put a treat in front of her, and then she'll just sit down and be a good girl.
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« Reply #13: May 24, 2011, 12:43:29 pm »

I always like to take my dog for a good run before she goes anywhere, especially when she was younger. Of course, that dog had so much energy she was still crazy, but it was better than had I brought her in without doing that. These days, we're okay at the vet without just because she's less energetic and they're so patient with her and willing to change from their normal procedures to make her more comfortable. I also bring some of her favorite treats so I can get her focused if she's getting worked up by something going on - she's very food-motivated, however and would most likely ignore an intruder for a good treat. But if she gets out of control, all I have to do is put a treat in front of her, and then she'll just sit down and be a good girl.

It's nice to hear that exercise and treats work for energetic dogs because my lab is still a bundle of energy at 5 years old. I think before our next appointment the dogs and I are going to have a loooong session with the tennis ball and I'll bring some cheese and bacon pieces to the office.  Thanks for sharing your tactics.  Smiley
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« Reply #14: May 24, 2011, 02:27:12 pm »

It's nice to hear that exercise and treats work for energetic dogs because my lab is still a bundle of energy at 5 years old. I think before our next appointment the dogs and I are going to have a loooong session with the tennis ball and I'll bring some cheese and bacon pieces to the office.  Thanks for sharing your tactics.  Smiley

You have received some great advice so far from these great folks.  If I may also offer:  once you have found an appropriate vet be sure to take the dogs to the office for "no reason".  I have a Great Dane (9 months) and two other dogs.  I wanted to be proactive with my Dane to ensure that I didn't run into any difficulties at the vets office.  Nothing like a 145lb ball of highly resistant dog if she decides that she doesn't feel like complying.   Undecided  If there was an emergency I wanted the environment to be familiar at least.  I take Jadzia into the office at least once a month, just for a visit and to put her on the scale.  The staff (including vets) are wonderful with her and fawn all over her and fill her up with treats.  She goes into the unoccupied exam rooms and behind the desks of the staff.  The staff encourage her to be curious and reward good behaviour with plenty of treats.  The vets office is now a place that she loves to go to.

She will be going for surgery next week and boy am I ever glad that I have done the ground work.  She will be comfortable and confident while she is there.  I, on the other hand, shall be a nervous wreck until she is home.

I hope this helps. 

 
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