The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
August 17, 2017, 09:01:19 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 17, 2017, 09:01:19 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: Kemetic Myths for kids  (Read 6685 times)
Jenett
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:February 19, 2015, 10:34:23 pm
United States United States

Religion: Priestess in initiatory religious witchcraft tradition
Posts: 2506


Blog entries (1)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15: May 22, 2011, 08:37:06 pm »

I believe you can tell a partial truth without telling a lie. 

This.

Not Kemetic, but as many of you may know, my father was a specialist in Ancient Greek theatre, and I grew up being told stories of Greek mythology from the time I was tiny. We'd start with the creation myth sequence (the Titans, the birth of Zeus, etc.) and then go on through a variety of stories, go into the Iliad and the Odyssey, and then pause for a break (by the time I can remember, this was Bram Stoker and Lovecraft), and then start over - about every six months or so, almost every walk to school, dogwalk, any other time I was out with my father and we had time. (Not *every* time we did that, but it'd often be 10-15 minutes of what we'd done that day, and then more story.)

I was also the only person allowed into my father's performances (he had a one-man travelling show using marionettes doing Greek plays) under the age of 12, and I was allowed in quite early - I know when I was 9, but maybe before that - including to plays like Oedipus Rex and the Bacchae.

Anyway, what I think made it work:

- I had child-appropriate versions of the myths to read as well, and we talked a lot (certainly by the time I was 5 or 6) about how myths get told in different ways by different people, and about how a version in a children's book was going to be different than the version he told me, because he knew I was able to take in more of what was going on than a lot of children. (True, but also a situation where I did my best to live up to that trust, the same way I knew that I got to go do more fun stuff with my parents - museums, interesting places to eat, going to theatre, etc. - if I behaved well than if I didn't.)

I'm pretty sure that one of the examples he used was the Wizard of Oz, which was my favorite book for a long time in there, and we talked about how a book is different than a movie is different than a theatre production.) Growing up in a household where he was directing a play a year (he was a theatre professor, rather than classics) made that sort of obvious to me anyway, so I remember going "This is news to people?"

- He adjusted the graphicness of the details, but he didn't lie about what happened.

You can talk, for example, about Persephone being abducted and taken away without being graphic about rape. You can talk about Osiris being divided into pieces, but being put back by magic with a small child who's otherwise prepared for it. You can talk about the Bacchae tearing people apart, even, if you put it into some context (though he didn't tell me that bit until I was a bit older - eight or nine).

- He used names that I'd be hearing in other conversations (children's books of myths, classes, paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, which was a regular (weekly or bi-weekly) visit for us for a long time, etc.) He'd talk about how there are some different pronunciations, and that people sometimes disagree on them, but he wanted me to be able to match what I heard from him with what I heard from other people and other versions.

In Kemetic context, that might mean either using the more Latinised names, or switching them up, or just plain having a clear conversation about it every so often. (Kids do get used to the idea that people have different names in different settings, after all.)

- Most importantly, he didn't lie to me. I *always* knew that part of the myth of Persephone was about abduction, or at least the question of abduction, that Demeter did terrible things in her grief. I always knew that Pentheus died because he didn't believe the claims that Dionysus made. I always knew that Chronos wanted to kill Zeus, and that Zeus did not treat women well. Or any number of bits of Homer.

But that didn't mean my father was inappropriately graphic - most of the story would be things like descriptions of people or places or what they were doing, and the graphic action bits would get a brief sentence, age-appropriate. Persephone was taken away by Hades. Osiris was killed, and divided into pieces and scattered. Pentheus was attacked and killed by the Bacchae. Lots more emphasis on the more positive bits - people taking care of other people, or giving advice, or listening to advice, or whatever.

- And of course, they'd pay close attention to how I was responding to particular stories, and take lots of time to ask questions (to make sure I wasn't misunderstanding something, and being scared by it), and if I did get scared by something, they'd back off for a bit.

Other parental reading and stories included some pretty complex stuff - Mom read me _Uncle Tom's Cabin_ around the time I was 5 or 6, for example, but did it in very short bits (the chapters are pretty short) with lots of conversation and asking about ethics and how people treated each other and so on in between, and I remember that being a really interesting period of reading and discussion. (She did edit out some of the more graphic bits, but told most of the actual story pretty straight up.)

(Oddly, I tended to be a lot more scared by visual stuff: for a long time, I was terrified by a painting in the MFA that my family has since referred to as "Watson being eaten by the shark" (http://www.nga.gov/feature/watson/story1.shtm) to the point I'd skirt the edge of the room it was in and by one of the massive basalt sarcophagi in the Egyptian collection, far more than by stories or fiction.)

- What was cool about their approach is that I knew very early that bad things can happen to people (and that sometimes, people do things that make that more likely, and sometimes they don't - the latter of which made for a great foundation when they were doing more direct safety stuff as I got older) But also about what those myths can tell us about how we treat other people, the commitments we made, and so on. And that's pretty neat stuff to cover with kids early, I think.

I should note that in my childhood, my parents were active in the Episcopal Church - they returned to the Catholic Church and I joined it when I was 13. So it's not that they were following these ideas as their religious values - but rather definitely looking at stories and literature and theatre as ways to learn more about how we interact with the world.
Logged

Blog: Thoughts from a threshold: http://gleewood.org/threshold
Info for seekers: http://gleewood.org/seeking
Pagan books and resources: http://gleewood.org/books

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

Helmsman_of_Inepu
Master Member
****
Last Login:May 28, 2012, 07:22:37 am
United States United States

Religion: Kemetic Reconnaissance, Flamekeeping
Posts: 295


Blog entries (0)

Helmsman Of-Inepu
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #16: May 22, 2011, 09:43:46 pm »

Not Kemetic, but as many of you may know, my father was a specialist in Ancient Greek theatre, and I grew up being told stories of Greek mythology from the time I was tiny.

Further along this line, remember that you, as the storyteller, are the artist, and you shape the tale. So it's not like you are presenting a play by Shakespeare, and butchering the work of another artist.

I may write up a storytelling version of the Djehuty-Khonsu story. If so, I'll let you know. It sounds like you won't need it for a while yet. Wink
Logged

Kemetic Writers Group - Fiction and Poetry - Join! Create! Have fun!
Kemetic Reconnaissance blog.
Adding in a bit of Flamekeeping too. (dark flame, bright flame)
Bastemhet
Master Member
****
Last Login:July 29, 2012, 07:48:38 am
United States United States

Religion: Reformed Kemetic
Posts: 500


May She smile upon me always.

Blog entries (0)

http://www.facebook.com/h
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17: May 23, 2011, 05:04:57 am »

You don't have to avoid telling the story completely.  I would think it would suffice to say that Ausir died, and that he was given new life through Aset's love and magic.  You can then tell your child that Ausir now takes care of their ancestors, who have been given the same form of new life. 

...

I believe you can tell a partial truth without telling a lie.

Thanks so much Nehet!  I think I need to readjust my definition of truth.  That is a great way to think of the myth, and I'll try to be thinking of this when I put my hand to rewriting some of the stories myself.

Logged

Bastemhet
Master Member
****
Last Login:July 29, 2012, 07:48:38 am
United States United States

Religion: Reformed Kemetic
Posts: 500


May She smile upon me always.

Blog entries (0)

http://www.facebook.com/h
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18: May 23, 2011, 05:09:04 am »

Anyway, what I think made it work:

Thank you for such a wonderfully detailed post!  It has spurred some ideas on how I can plan on telling the myths and how to make the message be one of the most important things to discuss.  I think it's important to let kids answer questions rather than telling them to think a certain way, and you sound like you had a really great environment where your curiosity could flourish.  It really warms my heart to see that.  Again, thanks for all the great info, I will be sure to look back to it more than once in the future.  Smiley
Logged

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Myths « 1 2 »
Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology
Juniper 22 5272 Last post June 16, 2008, 12:11:35 pm
by Altair
Wicca and myths
Paganism For Beginners
Waldfrau 10 2377 Last post September 06, 2008, 09:24:02 am
by Waldfrau
MMC, GUM, and other myths of neoPaganism « 1 2 3 4 »
Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology
SunflowerP 48 9739 Last post January 04, 2009, 10:30:02 am
by SunflowerP
Myths
Ta Hiera Hellenic Polytheism SIG
Arienwen 5 1513 Last post August 15, 2010, 04:02:01 am
by catja6
Myths « 1 2 3 4 »
Paganism For Beginners
Smoke 47 6458 Last post November 27, 2010, 10:16:28 am
by Smoke
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.14 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.051 seconds with 37 queries.