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Author Topic: Preparing for Spring  (Read 5065 times)
Sparrow
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« Topic Start: March 08, 2007, 11:27:49 am »

hello All,

I'm in growing zone three. We are still under a lot of snow but the last day or two have been really nice and the snow is starting to melt  Smiley

It's time to start thinking about planning a garden and ordering seeds.

Until now I have only grown flowers and a few herbs. I don't have a lot of room to work with and much of the garden space doesn't get a lot of sun so I haven't tried growing vegetables before.

I have been reading about woad lately and how it is many more times more potent than brocolli in antioxidants. I would like to try growing some but information on this plant is proving difficult to find. Does anyone out there grow woad? I am wondering more about the northern locations and where to buy seed. 

 :)I have been reading that woad can also be considered a noxious weed and not really suitable for flower beds. Maybe there are a few different varieties.

Any general tips would be wonderful as well.

Thanks
 
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Thesaly
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« Reply #1: March 08, 2007, 03:37:23 pm »

I have been reading about woad lately and how it is many more times more potent than brocolli in antioxidants. I would like to try growing some but information on this plant is proving difficult to find. Does anyone out there grow woad? I am wondering more about the northern locations and where to buy seed. 

 :)I have been reading that woad can also be considered a noxious weed and not really suitable for flower beds. Maybe there are a few different varieties.

My first thought would be to check out books/magazines about natural dyes.  I think Spin-Off (Interweave Press) had an article about dyeing with woad several years ago, and there may have been info about growing it in the article as well. 

For specific books I'd see if you can check out copies of A Weaver's Garden and A Dyer's Garden, both by Rita Buchanan.  Both books cover gardening info in addition to the weaving/dyeing stuff.
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Mandi
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« Reply #2: March 08, 2007, 04:32:51 pm »

Yuck for snow.  Thank the gods above and below I'm in Z8b so we're starting to get into the growing season.  I'm still trying to get my garden out of dormancy.  My morning glory has come back from the root - thank goodness.  I'm thinking it's a hybrid of some description because in spite of hundreds of flowers, no seed pods.  Were it not for the root, then I would have been shopping for a replacement.  I've got some roses that seem to be waking up nicely with gorgeous red new growth, and the primrose is blooming.

I'm thinking if you have snow it's still too early to prune back what's already there. Pruning usually causes a spurt of new growth, and risking a freeze on delicate new growth would prolly be not so good.

I started off by clearing away as much of the very obviously dead as I could when the urge to prune early was driving me nuts.  Anything that's brown through, can go.  I give it the fingernail check before I cut to see if there's any life left inside.  Then I snap from the tip in 2-6" segments.  I hate loosing growth if it's absoloutely salvedgeable.

After the snow goes, you can start turning over the rest, and more aggressively clearing.

No knowledge of woad here, if it's not thorny, toxic, or floral it hasn't grown for me yet.  I'll wait around and see if anyone has any spiffy suggestions though.  Who knows, I might give it a try meself.
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« Reply #3: March 08, 2007, 06:39:02 pm »


I have been reading that woad can also be considered a noxious weed and not really suitable for flower beds. Maybe there are a few different varieties.

Here it Washington State, it's illegal to plant/grow woad.  It's classified amongst the most noxious weeds in our area.  You might want to check your local regs and find out whether it's legal to grow in your area.

I've been itchin' to grow woad for years (I dye my own wool), but not enough to move elsewhere.  Wink

Brina
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Sparrow
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« Reply #4: March 08, 2007, 07:42:07 pm »

Yuck for snow.  Thank the gods above and below I'm in Z8b so we're starting to get into the growing season.  I'm still trying to get my garden out of dormancy.  My morning glory has come back from the root - thank goodness.  I'm thinking it's a hybrid of some description because in spite of hundreds of flowers, no seed pods.  Were it not for the root, then I would have been shopping for a replacement.  I've got some roses that seem to be waking up nicely with gorgeous red new growth, and the primrose is blooming.

I'm thinking if you have snow it's still too early to prune back what's already there. Pruning usually causes a spurt of new growth, and risking a freeze on delicate new growth would prolly be not so good.

I started off by clearing away as much of the very obviously dead as I could when the urge to prune early was driving me nuts.  Anything that's brown through, can go.  I give it the fingernail check before I cut to see if there's any life left inside.  Then I snap from the tip in 2-6" segments.  I hate loosing growth if it's absoloutely salvedgeable.

After the snow goes, you can start turning over the rest, and more aggressively clearing.

No knowledge of woad here, if it's not thorny, toxic, or floral it hasn't grown for me yet.  I'll wait around and see if anyone has any spiffy suggestions though.  Who knows, I might give it a try meself.

Hi Mandi, sounds like you have a beautiful garden Cheesy I'ts a bit cold here for a lot of the delicate flowers and vines. 

I have a few roses from the explorer and parkland series because alas nothing else will survive the winter here. And no scent, scent was sacrificed for hardiness. I planted a boxwood hedge about 3 years ago but it hasn't done anything...too cold. There is soooo much die back that it can't recover during our short summer. I think I have to take it out and dkreplace it with currants or cottoneaster Sad oh well.

I planted some Lady's Mantel last year. I really hope that comes up in the spring.
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Sparrow
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« Reply #5: March 08, 2007, 07:47:30 pm »

Here it Washington State, it's illegal to plant/grow woad.  It's classified amongst the most noxious weeds in our area.  You might want to check your local regs and find out whether it's legal to grow in your area.

I've been itchin' to grow woad for years (I dye my own wool), but not enough to move elsewhere.  Wink

Brina

Thanks for the heads up!!  You know, I didn't think to check about foreign invader species thing.  I should know better, there are notices in the paper all the time about that. 

I know virginia creeper is on the ban list for a lot of US states. Its ok here in Alberta though. I'll make sure to check before I order any.

Thanks  Smiley
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Altair
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« Reply #6: March 08, 2007, 09:39:31 pm »

I know virginia creeper is on the ban list for a lot of US states. Thanks  Smiley

Is it really?? It's native at least in the eastern states, but it does seem to have prolific growth habits, so I could see where it might be considered invasive in some circumstances...but banned? Wow.

I went out of my way to find some to plant in my garden, and I'm glad I did; the berries are a wildlife favorite, and the color of the leaves in autumn is spectacular.

New York City is Zone 6 or 7, so we're not quite there yet for the gardening season, but spring looms SO close...the anticipation is killing me...

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« Reply #7: March 08, 2007, 09:58:19 pm »

I am living in a place with a yard for the first time in my life! Having lived in Brooklyn most of my adult life, I've never been able to grow anything (black thumb for indoor stuff).

However, I've planted lavendar, rosemary, lily of the valley, and the area for my 3 rose bushes is almost ready. I've learned how to use a garden weasle, a rake (for the leaves), and my friend is going to show me how to mow grass. I've put 50 lbs of Jubilee composted manure & lime in the area I'm going to plant the roses.

Another friend is giving me slips from his climbing rose and wisteria.

I've gotten a hummingbird feeder and have also planted 2 butterfly bushes.

This is so exciting! I've never played in the dirt before like this. Oh, and I have this absolutely wonderful lilac TREE! Right in front of my porch and it's 25 feet high. I can't wait for the flowers to bloom.

Dogwood, freesia, daffodils and pansies are all in full bloom already here in Greenville, SC.

Phouka
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Sparrow
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« Reply #8: March 08, 2007, 10:58:38 pm »



This is so exciting! I've never played in the dirt before like this. Oh, and I have this absolutely wonderful lilac TREE! Right in front of my porch and it's 25 feet high. I can't wait for the flowers to bloom.


Phouka

I had that same feeling when I moved to the place I'm in now! The condo I was in before had a small concrete slab for a yard. When we moved here I was giddy  Cheesy My garden gives me so much happiness. I wish it was sunnier out in the back. I'm pretty much restricted to plants that will tolerate a good amount of shade. The front is full of roses and dianthus but I don't get to look at them as much.
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Sparrow
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« Reply #9: March 08, 2007, 11:23:55 pm »

Is it really?? It's native at least in the eastern states, but it does seem to have prolific growth habits, so I could see where it might be considered invasive in some circumstances...but banned? Wow.

I went out of my way to find some to plant in my garden, and I'm glad I did; the berries are a wildlife favorite, and the color of the leaves in autumn is spectacular.

New York City is Zone 6 or 7, so we're not quite there yet for the gardening season, but spring looms SO close...the anticipation is killing me...



Ok, well. I just wanted to make sure that was the case so I did a quick search but couldn't find anything about restrictions on virginia creeper.

I'm sure I read something about it being banned because I was a little concerned about adding it to my garden. It seems to me that the ban was in areas surrounding parklands  because it was choking out the native species of plants.  I can't seem to find anything about that with my searches tonight, though.
I'll do another search tomorrow but I would think that if it really was banned I would have found that information on the sites I went to.

It is beautiful isn't it? I new it was a fast grower but Wow.
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yewberry
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« Reply #10: March 10, 2007, 03:11:03 am »

I'm sure I read something about it being banned because I was a little concerned about adding it to my garden.

Maybe it's banned somewhere else than the U.S?  Rhodedendron is native to my area (Pacific Northwest) but it's a noxious garden escapee in Ireland.

Brina
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Thistle
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« Reply #11: March 10, 2007, 02:24:55 pm »

Quote
I have been reading about woad lately and how it is many more times more potent than brocolli in antioxidants. I would like to try growing some but information on this plant is proving difficult to find. Does anyone out there grow woad? I am wondering more about the northern locations and where to buy seed. 

 :)I have been reading that woad can also be considered a noxious weed and not really suitable for flower beds. Maybe there are a few different varieties.

Any general tips would be wonderful as well.

Not that I know anything about woad in general, but I googled it and followed links until I came to www.woad.org.uk that has a lot of info (including a picture of some pretty yarn on the front page). Anyway here: http://woad.weebly.com/links.html at the bottom there are a couple of sites listed that carry seeds.
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« Reply #12: March 11, 2007, 12:44:18 am »

Anyway here: http://woad.weebly.com/links.html at the bottom there are a couple of sites listed that carry seeds.
Naughty Thistle, setting people on the woad to wuin.

<runs away very fast>

Sunflower
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« Reply #13: March 11, 2007, 09:59:47 am »

::chokes::

We need a smiley of someone with a club, prepared to beat evil punners over the head!
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Sparrow
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« Reply #14: March 11, 2007, 10:49:09 am »

Not that I know anything about woad in general, but I googled it and followed links until I came to www.woad.org.uk that has a lot of info (including a picture of some pretty yarn on the front page). Anyway here: http://woad.weebly.com/links.html at the bottom there are a couple of sites listed that carry seeds.

Thankyou for those, Thistle  Smiley I'm going to add them to mt favorites list. I'll see if I can find the article about the recent study about the health benefits of eating woad.
 Here it is:

“It can make more than 60 times the amount found in broccoli, and in a much purer form,” says Stefania Galletti at the Experimental Institute for Industrial Crops in Bologna, who carried out the study with colleagues at the University of Bologna in Italy.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9735-from-woad-warriors-to-cancerbuster.html

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