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Author Topic: Avoiding "Made in China"  (Read 12531 times)
Ocelot
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« Reply #15: July 02, 2007, 01:05:17 pm »

India is a major tea-producer, but IIRC there are other areas of the world where it's grown and processed too.  (China is another major one.)

I admit I don't have much specific knowledge here, though, just a sort of general fuzziness, so maybe someone who knows more will help us out...

The Rooibos Red tea that I like Only grows in one small place in Africa - Cederberg, I think.
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« Reply #16: July 02, 2007, 01:07:26 pm »

The Rooibos Red tea that I like Only grows in one small place in Africa - Cederberg, I think.

That's not actually tea-tea, though, it's an herb.  Wink
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« Reply #17: July 02, 2007, 01:40:34 pm »

Probably depends on how attached to a particular brand of tea you are...  I've had some really yummy Japanese green teas.  Smiley

Yeah, this is true.  I guess most green teas I've tried that I Like are Chinese.  My Celestial Seasonings Decaf Green Tea says it's made in Bolder, CO.  I'm betting that doesn't include where it's grown, though.  There's nothing about that.  I should try Japanese green tea.  I'm a bit sensitive to Some teas and their caffine, Green Tea is one of those that I have to have in Decaf, so I'm a bit limited in what i can have in that area.  White Teas and Roobios and even Black tea, though I'm fine with, oddly enough.  But I guess I can always be at peace with my Red Clover Tea since it's Definately grown in the US.
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« Reply #18: July 02, 2007, 03:00:03 pm »

(My thinking is that it's damn near impossible.)

What to do when everything is ‘Made in China?’
A one-week attempt to avoid products from there meets with little success

U.S. shoppers may be forgiven if they are becoming leery of Chinese-made goods and are trying to fill their shopping carts with products free of ingredients from that country.

The trouble is, that may be almost impossible.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19508453/

Avoiding "made in China" products is very hard indeed.  But, products that include Chinese ingredients do not even have to be listed as such on product packaging. No imported ingredients need be listed at all. (I found this out by directly contacting Kellogs Co. and it is the same for all brands)

I gave up trying to boycott China made goods, other than foods, long ago. I try to go organic as much as possible....but even then I am skeptical of the store brands and cheaper priced orgainics sources. So, I try to stay with brands I know.

READ ALL LABELS on food items. A lot of candy is a product of China these days. You will be surprised what old standbys are now "product of Mexico" (Chickletts gum for example), "product of Brazill", or any number of other countries.

Many people posted about tea.......ah. I love tea but it is something that I have had to sacrifice quite a bit from my diet.  I was not feeling well - headaches, and just generally "blah" after drinking tea. I investigated and was horrified to learn that teas grown in China and India test very high in DDT. DDT is used widley in both countries as a mosquito control. Now, I buy US grown herb teas, but they aren't the same, I miss a good 'ol cup of tea!

When it comes to foods such as wheat or corn gluten imported from other countries, there is absolutely no need for it. We have all the resources right here at our disposal. It's just the big corporations cutting corners to make more profit.

My big problem with food imports from China, India, Africa, etc. is that they have very little, if any, regulations on food preparations in those countries, which means no standard of what is sanitary and what isn't. The US has guidelines and inspections and we can still have products tainted with salmonella, ecoli, and mad cow.  It should have come as no surprise that unregulated ingredients are harmfull. 

Oh well, I'll climb down off my soap box now (even if it isn't "made in USA")




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Ocelot
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« Reply #19: July 02, 2007, 03:19:50 pm »

That's not actually tea-tea, though, it's an herb.  Wink

I always forget that  Grin
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« Reply #20: July 02, 2007, 04:49:26 pm »

I don't remember exaclty who that was either who was already boycotting, but shortly after that post, I started my own "as much as I can" boycott of China.  It's hard.  But I just bought a Fantastic pair of stylish and Comfortable shoes made in Mexico by a brand of Born Shoes.  Granted, it's not the USA where workers will get proper wages, but I'd rather support Mexican trade than China's at this point.

I eat mostly a whole food type diet, so food usually isn't a concern for me being that I live in Texas where a lot of the imported stuff comes from Mexico.  But I am training myself to keep a lookout.  There are some things, like my Green and White teas that I'm just going to have to concede on, though.  but I have reveled in the fact that food storage options are easy.  Just use Pyrex glassware instead of plastic.  It's sturdier anyways AND it can go in the oven.  Some Corningware is also made in the USA.

Clothing and electronics are where most of us are gonna have a REALLY hard time.  The US just doesn't make much.  More so electronics than clothing, but still. 



ANd even if you make your own clothes, you still have to deal with  where the fabric came from.  Is there any us made fabric anymore?
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« Reply #21: July 02, 2007, 05:20:55 pm »

ANd even if you make your own clothes, you still have to deal with  where the fabric came from.  Is there any us made fabric anymore?

I would think that there are still some wool fabrics grown and manufactured on US soil (sheep, llama). There should also be a fair amount of fabric from New Zealand - it's sheep city over there. Um... Egyptian cotton? I don't know the worker laws in Egypt.

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« Reply #22: July 02, 2007, 06:18:54 pm »

I would think that there are still some wool fabrics grown and manufactured on US soil (sheep, llama). There should also be a fair amount of fabric from New Zealand - it's sheep city over there. Um... Egyptian cotton? I don't know the worker laws in Egypt.

Shadowcat

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a websitre that may possibly answer some questions, including my own.
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« Reply #23: July 03, 2007, 02:34:49 am »

I would think that there are still some wool fabrics grown and manufactured on US soil (sheep, llama). There should also be a fair amount of fabric from New Zealand - it's sheep city over there. Um... Egyptian cotton? I don't know the worker laws in Egypt.

Shadowcat

I thought "Egyptian cotton" was just the name of the breed of cotton bush, as in "African violet" or "German shepherd". I could be wrong, though.

And allow me to throw a wrench into the discussion: if everyone boycotts these companies and they go out of business, then where will all those laborers be?
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« Reply #24: July 03, 2007, 08:47:01 am »

And allow me to throw a wrench into the discussion: if everyone boycotts these companies and they go out of business, then where will all those laborers be?

That is a tough one, but some people think they will be better off. Most workers in these others countires are little more than slave labor, working for pennies a day on items that the US sells for way over 100% profit. Some even just work for food and board.

Even if the companies are US companies or US supported companies the workers have no heath care, workers compensation, and no rights. Many are child laborers. If you are injured on the job - too bad out you go, you are replaced in an instant.  I hate that US companies don't care about these peole, only the cheap labor they can get from them.

People work in the factories because for some, the only alternative is begging. This is especially true in India.

In China most of the workers are young women. Men see factory work as demeaning and won't do it.  Many rural families will send a daughter to work in an urban factory far away from her family to supliment their income. She will have no say in the matter. She will work long hours and live at the factory and board with several other women. Because of China's strict "one child limit" families are often eager to get rid of a girl (have her out on her own) so they can try for a boy.

When we buy a cheap item, there are unhappy faces attached to it (bad Karma) but what are we to do?
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« Reply #25: July 03, 2007, 11:08:28 am »

Men see factory work as demeaning and won't do it.

So what do the men do for a living if factory work is too "demeaning" for them?  And moreover, what is so demeaning about factory work?

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« Reply #26: July 03, 2007, 01:40:17 pm »

So what do the men do for a living if factory work is too "demeaning" for them?  And moreover, what is so demeaning about factory work?

   ~~~Pyperlie<^>

I have no clue what the men do, but this might explain what's so demeaning about factory work.
http://comment.independent.co.uk/columnists_a_l/johann_hari/article2504611.ece
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« Reply #27: July 03, 2007, 06:07:54 pm »

So what do the men do for a living if factory work is too "demeaning" for them?  And moreover, what is so demeaning about factory work?

In the US and other first world counries, not much.  In third world (and some second world) countries, it can be practically slave labor.
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« Reply #28: July 04, 2007, 02:18:53 am »

That is a tough one, but some people think they will be better off. Most workers in these others countires are little more than slave labor, working for pennies a day on items that the US sells for way over 100% profit. Some even just work for food and board.

I suppose ... although I suspect in at least some places their choices amount to "slave-like labor indoors sitting down" vs "slave-like labor outdoors knee-deep in a rice field" and I respect that they've chosen the (marginally) better path. True, the factories pay peanuts and have no benefits, but neither does anyone else there -- if the corporations pull out, these third-world economies are not going to spontaneously generate jobs with 40-hour work weeks and full health insurance. I think that's the real sad thing, that these factories are probably the best game in town.

Not that this makes the corporations' behavior right, of course, but I think the answer lies in fixing the rug, not yanking it out from under them. And it will have to come from both the government and the workers (as in the link that Mandrina posted).
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« Reply #29: July 04, 2007, 11:19:00 am »

I suppose ... although I suspect in at least some places their choices amount to "slave-like labor indoors sitting down" vs "slave-like labor outdoors knee-deep in a rice field" and I respect that they've chosen the (marginally) better path. True, the factories pay peanuts and have no benefits, but neither does anyone else there -- if the corporations pull out, these third-world economies are not going to spontaneously generate jobs with 40-hour work weeks and full health insurance. I think that's the real sad thing, that these factories are probably the best game in town.

Not that this makes the corporations' behavior right, of course, but I think the answer lies in fixing the rug, not yanking it out from under them. And it will have to come from both the government and the workers (as in the link that Mandrina posted).

And as long as we, the consumers, just gobble up the cheap products from the slave labor, the corporations will have no incentive to change.  Listen, China doesn't give a crap about its workers.  If it did, it would have stopped this long ago.  Their government won't help them.  They already have a few labor laws over there, but no one enforces them.  One of the best ways to get a government like that to take notice is to hit it in the pocketbook.  These workers are only making per month what our low income workers make per day.  If the companies even just tripled that wage and made the living conditions better, they'd Still have a profit as opposed to having factories here.

As far as whether the workers will suffer more when the corporations pull out?  That really is a tough call.  But you can't just let a demeaning and terrible work condition persist because you're afraid it might get a little tougher.  That's the thing about revolution or even just change.  You have to take that chance to make things better.  And sometimes it might get a little worse before it gets better, but at least you are on your way to making things better.

It looks like there's a few workers in factories who are revolting.  I think they are ready for a change.
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