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Author Topic: Eating Meat...looked down upon? Or no?  (Read 25533 times)
mandy1216
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« Reply #135: March 23, 2009, 10:03:06 pm »


But what is your take? Is it going against the religion?

Thank you very much.

~AngersLegacy

I'm a circle of life girl. This comes from growing up on a farm too, where you eat what you sow, grow, and take care of. I currently don't eat much meat (if I can buy organic I do, and that's all I will eat). For me, it comes to bringing the animal dignity, health, and respect while it's alive. An animal raised in a corporate facility doesn't have this kind of life, therefore it's not right (or particularly healthy) for me to eat it.

My mom still goes to her neighbors, picks out the cow, and knows who is slaughtering it and in what conditions. When I go home, I enjoy a nice steak because I am aware of it's life and it's cycle. When I make bank, and can afford free range, all organic goodness, I'm gonna eat me some meat. Until then, I'm vegetarian, with some eco-friendly fish in the mix as well as some cage free eggs.

Starhawk addresses this in her writings too. It's natural for people to eat meat, but our removal from the process is the issue. If we can go back to sustainable relationships of respect with the animals we are consuming, it's a good and natural thing. I don't think a religion that embraces the natural cycles of life can get up in arms about, well the natural damn cycle.
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Unmutual
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« Reply #136: March 27, 2009, 02:06:43 pm »

But what is your take? Is it going against the religion?

I became vegitarian and pagan in the same week (and that week isn't long ago, so I'm speaking from a newbie perspective) - not because of a conscious decision that to be in a nature religion I had to give up meat. But it was connected: part of the process of me thinking seriously about the world and the way I want to live in it.

While I won't deny for a moment that death and eating things is part of natural cycles - I personally do not feel comfortable with it. I couldn't actually kill an animal to eat it, just because of a sticky conscience and because living things are beautiful and all, so I don't see it as fair to disassociate the killing/eating process. This is obviously a personal thing, though.

What I would say to the larger meat eating community, however, is that the way meat gets to the plate is really really horrific - I'm sure many here are already consicous of sourcing their food ethically. Unfortunately, I'm too lazy to check labels and all - for me, vegitarianism is the simplest way to cut out unethical meat.

Finally, I'm a pretty bad eater, so cutting out meat has forced me to think about what I eat, how I eat it, how to get the right nutreants and encouraged me to choose new, risky meals at restaurants.
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« Reply #137: March 29, 2009, 08:28:10 pm »

Hello,

Although I have been Pagan (Wiccan) for four years, I have never found the answer to this question. When I researched, some say it is all right to eat meat as long as your offer a 'thank you' and a blessing for the animal who died.
But I bought a book, and the author says that it is not allowed and Karma will return for you eating meat and taking in an animal that was slaughtered. But then I thought that when Mankind was first born, they hunted and ate animals.

Very confusing...

I do eat meat. (Working at Burger King, I suppose that is expected. EVERYTHING is meat.. Wink)


It is a grand gift, to bestow upon one's self, to feel and experience what 'truly human' feels like.  To be utterly free of consuming the DNA of other lesser evolved species.

.




But what is your take? Is it going against the religion?

Thank you very much.

~AngersLegacy
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« Reply #138: March 30, 2009, 04:46:23 pm »

I became vegitarian and pagan in the same week (and that week isn't long ago, so I'm speaking from a newbie perspective) - not because of a conscious decision that to be in a nature religion I had to give up meat. But it was connected: part of the process of me thinking seriously about the world and the way I want to live in it.

While I won't deny for a moment that death and eating things is part of natural cycles - I personally do not feel comfortable with it. I couldn't actually kill an animal to eat it, just because of a sticky conscience and because living things are beautiful and all, so I don't see it as fair to disassociate the killing/eating process. This is obviously a personal thing, though.

What I would say to the larger meat eating community, however, is that the way meat gets to the plate is really really horrific - I'm sure many here are already consicous of sourcing their food ethically. Unfortunately, I'm too lazy to check labels and all - for me, vegitarianism is the simplest way to cut out unethical meat.

Finally, I'm a pretty bad eater, so cutting out meat has forced me to think about what I eat, how I eat it, how to get the right nutreants and encouraged me to choose new, risky meals at restaurants.

I totally concur with you here, Unmutual! I am okay with eating meat - *definitely* not okay with how the animals are treated in factory farms and how they are brutalized. They are denied all their basic rights, and I just simply refuse to be a part of such a sick industry. I think many people choose to forget how that creature suffered to become a hamburger; they would rather push it in the back of their mind and forget it. I can't do that..the thought of it terrorizes me.

And I can't understand if I ever had children, how could I ever tell my child they are essentially eating that cute cow we just passed down the road? Course..I don't have children, but it is something to think about..

That being said, I also think people should do what is best for them and their needs, and I in no way feel ill will towards anyone who eats meat. However...I think people should at least stop and consider where it comes from, how it is slaughtered, etc, and try to pull away from that cruel industry as much as possible by eating organic or purchasing local meats if possible where the critters at least had a fairly decent life. (And I don't only advocate local meat, but local produce as well.)

Sorry if my thoughts are flaky, long day at work.  Smiley

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« Reply #139: March 30, 2009, 05:15:39 pm »


And I can't understand if I ever had children, how could I ever tell my child they are essentially eating that cute cow we just passed down the road? Course..I don't have children, but it is something to think about..


Just to reassure you; many children have a morbid fascination with life and death so I have not found this to be a problem. My son is perfectly ok with petting the neighbour's lambs in spring and seeing dad cut up the carcass in October.

I personally feel it is important to tell them just that - to help them develop a respect for the animal that gave it's life so that they could eat. To me that means taking care of the produce, not letting food go to waste, and being mindful of what sort of circles we are part of. I feel it does a disservice to the children to not educate them about that. Too many kids think food is something that comes in strange packages in a grocery store - letting them see that food used to be a living creature or grew on a tree/in a field helps them understand more of the world and its processes. Education is important.

IMHO. (And this is a pet peeve of mine, so please don't take it as a personal attack. Smiley )

Stardancer
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« Reply #140: March 30, 2009, 05:30:21 pm »

Just to reassure you; many children have a morbid fascination with life and death so I have not found this to be a problem. My son is perfectly ok with petting the neighbour's lambs in spring and seeing dad cut up the carcass in October.

I personally feel it is important to tell them just that - to help them develop a respect for the animal that gave it's life so that they could eat. To me that means taking care of the produce, not letting food go to waste, and being mindful of what sort of circles we are part of. I feel it does a disservice to the children to not educate them about that. Too many kids think food is something that comes in strange packages in a grocery store - letting them see that food used to be a living creature or grew on a tree/in a field helps them understand more of the world and its processes. Education is important.

IMHO. (And this is a pet peeve of mine, so please don't take it as a personal attack. Smiley )

Stardancer
Very well said.  I completely agree with this.  Oh and OT your avatar looks like my cat that I had for 18 years.
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« Reply #141: March 30, 2009, 05:44:28 pm »

Just to reassure you; many children have a morbid fascination with life and death so I have not found this to be a problem. My son is perfectly ok with petting the neighbour's lambs in spring and seeing dad cut up the carcass in October.

I personally feel it is important to tell them just that - to help them develop a respect for the animal that gave it's life so that they could eat. To me that means taking care of the produce, not letting food go to waste, and being mindful of what sort of circles we are part of. I feel it does a disservice to the children to not educate them about that. Too many kids think food is something that comes in strange packages in a grocery store - letting them see that food used to be a living creature or grew on a tree/in a field helps them understand more of the world and its processes. Education is important.

IMHO. (And this is a pet peeve of mine, so please don't take it as a personal attack. Smiley )

Stardancer

Hmm..I never thought of it that way to be honest, that's a great point Stardancer! Maybe it is better to education them on where the food comes from and whatnot, but encourage them to be mindful of how it is produced and such. That seems better I think. Smiley

I'm in no way feeling attacked, by all means please share your thoughts! Smiley
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« Reply #142: March 30, 2009, 05:56:04 pm »

They are denied all their basic rights,

Like their right to free assembly?
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« Reply #143: March 30, 2009, 09:23:14 pm »

And I can't understand if I ever had children, how could I ever tell my child they are essentially eating that cute cow we just passed down the road? Course..I don't have children, but it is something to think about..

Child:  Where do hamburgers come from?
Parent:  Well, hamburgers are made of beef, and beef comes from cows, honey.

As with anything, be open and honest and straightforward, and don't try to dumb it down any farther than you absolutely have to in order for them to understand.  I don't see the issue.

(Sorry--you hit one of my peeves with the "cute" thing, too.  Sure, cows are cute.  They're also tasty and nutritious.  I'm firmly of the opinion that it is entirely possible to appreciate them in both capacities.)
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« Reply #144: March 31, 2009, 09:57:00 am »

And I can't understand if I ever had children, how could I ever tell my child they are essentially eating that cute cow we just passed down the road?

As a child I grew up knowing I was eating those cute deer I saw nibbling clover just down the road.  In fact I was used to them hanging in the garage before they went to the butcher.  In one case (though I was teen-aged at this point) I actually helped turn the deer into burger. 

I understood from a very young age where meat came from, and I don't think I'm in any way mentally damaged from that knowledge.
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« Reply #145: March 31, 2009, 10:03:50 am »

Like their right to free assembly?

That only applies to cows on public land.  Wink
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« Reply #146: March 31, 2009, 10:31:24 am »

As a child I grew up knowing I was eating those cute deer I saw nibbling clover just down the road.  In fact I was used to them hanging in the garage before they went to the butcher.  In one case (though I was teen-aged at this point) I actually helped turn the deer into burger. 

I understood from a very young age where meat came from, and I don't think I'm in any way mentally damaged from that knowledge.

Indeed. My father elk hunts, and I always knew where the elk steaks and summer sausage came from. I used to deer hunt as well (not enough time, nor hunting partner anymore) and my girls were quite aware of where the venison came from. They were quite fascinated by the carcass hanging in the garage (until the youngest developed an aversion to dead things somehow *shrug*) and helped with the wrapping as they were too young to actually help with the butchering.
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« Reply #147: March 31, 2009, 03:02:23 pm »

As a child I grew up knowing I was eating those cute deer I saw nibbling clover just down the road.  In fact I was used to them hanging in the garage before they went to the butcher.  In one case (though I was teen-aged at this point) I actually helped turn the deer into burger. 

I understood from a very young age where meat came from, and I don't think I'm in any way mentally damaged from that knowledge.

Same here- my father used to hunt deer and as a kid I never had a problem with it.  In fact, my father used to give the lower part of the forelegs to my sister and I and show us how the tendons made the ankles move.  One of our early toys.  It's a little morbid, but I aced anatomy in high school.  And personally, I was always happy that the deer we ate had the opportunity to live in their natural habitat, and had a fighting chance against the hunters.  As a hunter, my father taught me the importance of natural conservation and the hunter's responsibility to protect the health and habitat of the herd.

These days I live in a city and can't hunt- but I still hold that we have a responsibility for the humane and respectful treatment of the animals we eat and the land from which they come.  To that end, I buy certified humanely raised and processed meats (and organic veggies) whenever I can afford to do so.  I believe that is the most effective way to lobby for the proper treatment of livestock- because let's face it, the meat processing plants are going to pay a heck of a lot more attention to where the money's going than to any picket line or letters of protest.  If we want humane treatment of animals, we have to show that we are willing to support farmers who voluntarily have their practices monitored and certified humane- even though it will cost a little more to do it the right way.  We've gotten used to meat on the cheap, but the corners are always cut on the side of animal welfare.  In my opinion, the most powerful thing a person can do in the fight for animal welfare is to keep eating meat, stay in the market so you keep your dollar votes, and cast those votes whenever possible for companies who go the extra mile to treat their livestock well.

Go vegetarian and you lose your vote.  That's the conclusion I've come to after looking at the situation very carefully.  I respect the conviction and ethics of people who have gone vegetarian based on their concern for animal welfare, but I worry that if everyone who's willing to alter their lifestyle for the cause goes vegetarian, then there won't be anyone left to make humane farming practices feasible even if the farmers all decided they wanted to reform.  Someone has to buy their products, after all, and if you are vegetarian you are by definition not doing that.  If everyone who cares goes vegetarian, the only ones left in the meat market will be those who don't care, and just want cheap meat no matter what the cost in humanity.  And the industry will have to cater to them.
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