The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
July 13, 2020, 04:41:43 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 13, 2020, 04:41:43 am

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: An Unusual Teaching Challenge  (Read 11394 times)
Keeper o Duckshoed Muse
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:October 09, 2008, 09:18:15 pm
United States United States

Religion: A Craftsman Witch with Elemental leanings
Posts: 45


Dancing a delicate line and loving every moment.

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Topic Start: September 18, 2007, 06:14:10 am »


      My first little own post.......yeesh people duck and cover!  At any rate I'm as some of you know over here in Japan, and I'm in fact teaching!  Now as part of my nifty-difty lesson plan structure (passed down upon the ages from Master ALT to Apprentice ALT  Roll Eyes ) I have been asked to teach about both Christmas and Halloween.  Which I'm completely happy to do!

      My challenge comes in that my supervisor's would like me to present the topics in a way that is personally and culturally relevant to me.  They feel that the students will have a stronger connection, and greater interest in Western culture if they can make it through personal knowledge of me.  I am all for sharing cultural information, but I tend to go a wee bit over board (  Grin ) on Yule and Samhain, they are for me very important days of the year.

      So the usual tom-foolery of baking, sewing, flower arranging, altar building, godly and ancestorly offerings gets done, on top of doing fun kitchy stuff that people enjoy around those times of year!  I've already decided to share some of the activities and gifts I do every year with my friends and co-workers here, but I am trying to think of ways to approach these topics in such a way as to make it interesting and not preachy to children.  I want them to enjoy Halloween and Christmas, not necessarily know their every scrap and scope of history!

     Therefore, what would you suggest and/or do in my position?   Huh I'm interested to hear your thoughts!

Ducky

Logged

I take responsibility for my insanity only!

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

Sine Silvering
Board Staff
Master Member
****
Last Login:February 20, 2011, 01:32:14 pm
United States United States

Religion: priestess, Gardnerian Wicca
Posts: 495


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1: September 18, 2007, 07:05:54 am »

      My first little own post.......yeesh people duck and cover!  At any rate I'm as some of you know over here in Japan, and I'm in fact teaching!  Now as part of my nifty-difty lesson plan structure (passed down upon the ages from Master ALT to Apprentice ALT  Roll Eyes ) I have been asked to teach about both Christmas and Halloween.  Which I'm completely happy to do!

      My challenge comes in that my supervisor's would like me to present the topics in a way that is personally and culturally relevant to me.  They feel that the students will have a stronger connection, and greater interest in Western culture if they can make it through personal knowledge of me.  I am all for sharing cultural information, but I tend to go a wee bit over board (  Grin ) on Yule and Samhain, they are for me very important days of the year.

      So the usual tom-foolery of baking, sewing, flower arranging, altar building, godly and ancestorly offerings gets done, on top of doing fun kitchy stuff that people enjoy around those times of year!  I've already decided to share some of the activities and gifts I do every year with my friends and co-workers here, but I am trying to think of ways to approach these topics in such a way as to make it interesting and not preachy to children.  I want them to enjoy Halloween and Christmas, not necessarily know their every scrap and scope of history!

     Therefore, what would you suggest and/or do in my position?   Huh I'm interested to hear your thoughts!

Ducky



I'll gently suggest that, unless you are completely out of the closet and your supervisors are aware that you are a pagan and thus a member of a VERY small minority subset of western religious tradition, that you discard all your actual current personal associations and that you teach the mainstream American popular/secular versions of both, with the religious basis included, of course.

Depending on how old your students are, of course, it sounds as if they want your students to get a taste of what they'd experience if they were visiting the US at those times of year, with a bit of the cultural and religious origins of what they'll see.

Certainly there's a certain amount of pagan history you can include, with the personal connection... but if you're teaching general cultural familiarization, then the mainstream  culture's stuff is what they want.  A lot more about trick-or-treating than about Dumb Suppers, for example, and about caroling, Christmas trees and Charlies Dickens and  Brown rather than Modrasnicht.

JMHO; YMMV, of course.  You know your situation.

Logged

--------------
BlessÚd Be!

When men speak ill of thee, live so as no one will believe them.
---Old Farmers Almanac, 1832
Journey
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:February 13, 2010, 04:43:29 pm
United States United States

Religion: None
Posts: 1821


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #2: September 18, 2007, 08:21:43 am »

      My first little own post.......yeesh people duck and cover!  At any rate I'm as some of you know over here in Japan, and I'm in fact teaching!  Now as part of my nifty-difty lesson plan structure (passed down upon the ages from Master ALT to Apprentice ALT  Roll Eyes ) I have been asked to teach about both Christmas and Halloween.  Which I'm completely happy to do!

      My challenge comes in that my supervisor's would like me to present the topics in a way that is personally and culturally relevant to me.  They feel that the students will have a stronger connection, and greater interest in Western culture if they can make it through personal knowledge of me.  I am all for sharing cultural information, but I tend to go a wee bit over board (  Grin ) on Yule and Samhain, they are for me very important days of the year.
Ducky


I'll gently suggest that, unless you are completely out of the closet and your supervisors are aware that you are a pagan and thus a member of a VERY small minority subset of western religious tradition, that you discard all your actual current personal associations and that you teach the mainstream American popular/secular versions of both, with the religious basis included, of course.

Depending on how old your students are, of course, it sounds as if they want your students to get a taste of what they'd experience if they were visiting the US at those times of year, with a bit of the cultural and religious origins of what they'll see.

Yep, I agree that what the lesson seems to be about is mainstream culture in the U.S. Personally, I wouldn't "go pagan" on them. If you teach them your pagan traditions, well, if they ever get to the U.S., they will be surprised Chrsitmas wasn't exaclty what they thought it was.  Grin

A nice touch though might be to add ONE of your pagan traditions, one that is really meaningful to you. Just make sure they know it is Yule not Christmas.

Since you didn't say the age of your students, I don't know if you are teaching pre-school or college, so I can't recommend any activities. 

I think you might do well to think of it as a "what to expect to see in the U.S. at these times of year" kind of assignment. Imagine your students stepping off an airplane, and all the question they might have about what they would be seeing;
Christmas; What's that big pine tree with the decorations for? Who is the man in the red suit with a white beard? Why is he ringing a bell? Why so much red and green?
Halloween; Why are people wearing costumes? Why is that pumpkin carved with a face? What are the colors and foods associated with the holiday? Why so many monster faces?

That would be what I would want to know if the assignment were reversed, that is if I were to be told what a major holiday in another country was all about.

You can explain that not all Americans believe this way, but the majority do, without trying to give equal time to all other religions (spare yourself the aggravation) Remember, not even all pagans believe the same things.

Have fun with it, this could be a fun assignment for all, depending on the ages of your students, they may already have some (not so correct) ideas about American holidays anyway.

Let us know how it turns out!

Logged
RandallS
Co-Host
Administrator
Grand Adept Member
*****
Last Login:June 23, 2020, 07:47:48 am
United States United States

Religion: Hellenic Pagan
TCN ID: ADMIN
Posts: 17181


Blog entries (0)


« Reply #3: September 18, 2007, 08:25:07 am »

Depending on how old your students are, of course, it sounds as if they want your students to get a taste of what they'd experience if they were visiting the US at those times of year, with a bit of the cultural and religious origins of what they'll see.

I agree with Sine, I suspect the most usual thing to teach is the popular culture expressions of the holidays. The people are there to learn English and something about American culture, not religion.
Logged

Randall
RetroRoleplaying [Blog - Forum] -- Out Of Print & Out Of Style Tabletop Roleplaying Games
Software Gadgets Blog -- Interesting Software, Mostly Free
Cheap Web Hosting -- Find an Affordable Web Host
Aisling
High Adept Member
******
*
Last Login:November 11, 2012, 02:17:34 pm
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
TCN ID: Aisling
Posts: 4056


Blog entries (4)

harvestmoon13


Ignore
« Reply #4: September 18, 2007, 09:54:22 am »

Therefore, what would you suggest and/or do in my position?   Huh I'm interested to hear your thoughts!

Agreeing with Sine as well.  Keep with the broader category of "this is how it's generally celebrated in the states".  You can add info about your own practices, but I wouldn't make it the main focus.
Logged

Jenett
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:February 23, 2020, 06:56:44 pm
United States United States

Religion: Priestess in initiatory religious witchcraft tradition
Posts: 2506


Blog entries (1)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5: September 18, 2007, 11:20:41 am »

Therefore, what would you suggest and/or do in my position?   Huh I'm interested to hear your thoughts!

I'm with the other comments, in that it's really a "What would you see over here at this time of year" thing, not a chance to get *very* personal.

One thing you could do, however, is something that I think might be worth some class time anyway - talking about the many different religious traditions and practices in the US (something that may be unfamiliar for Japanese students) and talking about how different traditions focus on things. So, for example, you might talk about a largely secular Christmas-time celebration, but also talk about religious aspects in Christianity, about how Hannukah has taken on larger role in American Judaism, about Kwanzaa, about Yule, etc.

Do you have friends in the States (or English speaking countries) from different religious traditions? Would they be willing to send you a few pictures and some text describing what they do?
Logged

Blog: Thoughts from a threshold: http://gleewood.org/threshold
Info for seekers: http://gleewood.org/seeking
Pagan books and resources: http://gleewood.org/books
Sine Silvering
Board Staff
Master Member
****
Last Login:February 20, 2011, 01:32:14 pm
United States United States

Religion: priestess, Gardnerian Wicca
Posts: 495


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6: September 19, 2007, 12:13:22 am »

[snippage]
One thing you could do, however, is something that I think might be worth some class time anyway - talking about the many different religious traditions and practices in the US (something that may be unfamiliar for Japanese students) and talking about how different traditions focus on things.   [snippage]

I think this is a good idea.  From what I've heard from my friends who've visited Japan, and one who has lived there for many years, teaching ESL, Japan remains a very homogeneous society; though of course they are aware, though at some remove, of the rest of the world, they don't live in a heterogeneous society.  Your students might be quite startled with the variety of religions, religious holidays and cultural-cum-religious practices that are shared in the US. 

Logged

--------------
BlessÚd Be!

When men speak ill of thee, live so as no one will believe them.
---Old Farmers Almanac, 1832
rose
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:September 01, 2011, 10:16:28 pm
United States United States

Religion: Shakti Wiccan with Reclaiming leanings
TCN ID: rose
Posts: 2923

Blog entries (0)

rose shannon
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7: September 19, 2007, 12:26:10 am »

      My first little own post.......yeesh people duck and cover!  At any rate I'm as some of you know over here in Japan, and I'm in fact teaching!  Now as part of my nifty-difty lesson plan structure (passed down upon the ages from Master ALT to Apprentice ALT  Roll Eyes ) I have been asked to teach about both Christmas and Halloween.  Which I'm completely happy to do!

   


well the happy to do is the important part:)

But I agree with everyone else. I have been teaching pagan preschool for a long time now, even before I came totally full on out of the closet, and it is easy, b/c really all you have to do is teach the science part of it; ultimately, that is what the Wheel is, for school purposes. The Solstice is really fun to teach, and if you want specific sources and ideas for teaching around that, email me Smiley
Logged

Goddess grant me:
  The power of Water,
  to accept with ease & grace what I cannot change.

  The power of Fire,
  for the energy & courage to change the things I can.

  The power of Air,
  for the ability and wisdom to know the difference.

  And the power of Earth,
  for the strength to continue my path.

http://rosejayadal.blogspot.com/
Keeper o Duckshoed Muse
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:October 09, 2008, 09:18:15 pm
United States United States

Religion: A Craftsman Witch with Elemental leanings
Posts: 45


Dancing a delicate line and loving every moment.

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #8: September 19, 2007, 04:10:23 am »

I'll gently suggest that, unless you are completely out of the closet and your supervisors are aware that you are a pagan and thus a member of a VERY small minority subset of western religious tradition, that you discard all your actual current personal associations and that you teach the mainstream American popular/secular versions of both, with the religious basis included, of course.

Depending on how old your students are, of course, it sounds as if they want your students to get a taste of what they'd experience if they were visiting the US at those times of year, with a bit of the cultural and religious origins of what they'll see.

Certainly there's a certain amount of pagan history you can include, with the personal connection... but if you're teaching general cultural familiarization, then the mainstream  culture's stuff is what they want.  A lot more about trick-or-treating than about Dumb Suppers, for example, and about caroling, Christmas trees and Charlies Dickens and  Brown rather than Modrasnicht.

JMHO; YMMV, of course.  You know your situation.




      At first, I freely admit I let my feelings get hurt by the responses I received.  But then I got over myself and actually paid attention to what you were trying to tell me!   Cheesy  The most important thing here is that my students gain some understanding of english-speaking culture on top of learning the language.  And I would be doing my students and other cultures a disservice by favoring my own preferences!  So for helping me to get my feet back on the ground where they belong, thank you everyone.

       That said, I'm trying to come up with as much general whoo hah on Halloween and Christmas/kwanza (I'm butchering the spelling I'm fairly certain please forgive me.)/hannukah/yule as I possibly can.  As well as trying to find interesting but simple activities to engage students from the age of six to twelve on the topics mentioned before.  I have the good old fashioned cut/paste/coloring book pages, cut outs, that sort of thing.  I was wondering if you have any activities that you might suggest?  Also any and all resources would be highly appreciated for information (wikipedia is my best friend!).

      Thank you for all of your help and advice,

Ducky
Logged

I take responsibility for my insanity only!
nemesisfirestorm
Master Member
****
Last Login:March 11, 2008, 07:07:34 am
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Brighideach Druid (OBOD) and a little bit of witchery thrown in.
Posts: 509


Tattoo for Brighid

Blog entries (1)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9: September 19, 2007, 06:32:46 am »

I have the good old fashioned cut/paste/coloring book pages, cut outs, that sort of thing.  I was wondering if you have any activities that you might suggest?  Also any and all resources would be highly appreciated for information (wikipedia is my best friend!).

Do you mean physical activities?  What about apple bobbing for Hallowe'en?  Possibly carving pumpkins (depending on health and safety - knives) or cutting out pumpkin faces from orange card.  This way you can also teach them the more pagan meanings behind the traditions, without pushing the issue.

For Christmas you can make cards, decorate a Yule log, make snowmen from toilet rolls and cotton wool, learn a carol or two or make mince pies (if you can get hold of the mince meat).

I have to say I know nothing about Kwanza or Hannukah (I'm probably butchering the spelling too).  We never learned anything about them when I was in school.

Whenever I want ideas of things to do for my son I look up homeschooling info on the net, you can get loads of ideas from those.  Try the Crayola website, they have stuff to print off and craft ideas on there.

I should have a few more sites bookmarked somewhere (my favourites folder would look like a family tree going back hundreds of years if it were diagrammed... Roll Eyes) if you want them? 
Logged

Mae'r cariad at fy ngwlad yn berwi yn fy ngwaed.

nemesisfirestorm
Master Member
****
Last Login:March 11, 2008, 07:07:34 am
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Brighideach Druid (OBOD) and a little bit of witchery thrown in.
Posts: 509


Tattoo for Brighid

Blog entries (1)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10: September 19, 2007, 06:46:08 am »

I should have a few more sites bookmarked somewhere (my favourites folder would look like a family tree going back hundreds of years if it were diagrammed... Roll Eyes) if you want them? 

Salt dough ornaments are fun to make too.  I actually made a statue for my Mum as a present last year.  The pic is from my mobile phone, so not great quality, and it's not painted here, but you get the idea.  It took a while, but it was fun Grin  I painted it with acrylic paints and varnished it for a nice finish.
Logged

Mae'r cariad at fy ngwlad yn berwi yn fy ngwaed.

Journey
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:February 13, 2010, 04:43:29 pm
United States United States

Religion: None
Posts: 1821


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #11: September 19, 2007, 08:14:40 am »

       That said, I'm trying to come up with as much general whoo hah on Halloween and Christmas/kwanza (I'm butchering the spelling I'm fairly certain please forgive me.)/hannukah/yule as I possibly can.  As well as trying to find interesting but simple activities to engage students from the age of six to twelve on the topics mentioned before.  I have the good old fashioned cut/paste/coloring book pages, cut outs, that sort of thing.  I was wondering if you have any activities that you might suggest?  Also any and all resources would be highly appreciated for information (wikipedia is my best friend!).
 

Here are some sites with printouts and ideas for crafts and projects for the age groups you are teachng, I have used these many times, hope they help:


http://familyfun.go.com/arts-and-crafts/season/specialfeature/halloween_ms_crafts/

http://familyfun.go.com/arts-and-crafts/season/minisite/christmas-main/

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/Home.html

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/school/index.shtml

Good Luck!
Logged
nemesisfirestorm
Master Member
****
Last Login:March 11, 2008, 07:07:34 am
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Brighideach Druid (OBOD) and a little bit of witchery thrown in.
Posts: 509


Tattoo for Brighid

Blog entries (1)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12: September 19, 2007, 08:39:07 am »

I was wondering if you have any activities that you might suggest?  Also any and all resources would be highly appreciated for information (wikipedia is my best friend!).

Another idea would be arranging a Hallowe'en dress up party with "spooky" food, you could do the apple bobbing at this.  You can dye fruit juices with food dye to make them black or purple for example.  There are some Hallowe'en recipes here and if you can't do baking in class you could always do some of it at home and take it in to be finished by the children perhaps?  I don't know how it works in your classes, or what facilities you have there though.

You could do the same for Christmas, as most schools here have a Christmas Dinner day and a Christmas party day before breaking up for the holidays.  I once made a snow palace for a party.  I built walls and turrets using mini marshmallows for bricks, sticking them together with icing.  I supported the inside of the walls with those wafers you get for ice-cream.  I used ice-cream cones for the rooves of the turrets and wafers and licorice laces for the draw bridge.  I then drizzled runny icing over the turrets to look like snow, and dusted the inside and around it with icing powder.  To make it useful and a little more healthy it was then filled with fruits and nuts like a bowl.  This would be pretty easy for kids to make, and gives you great sticky fingers! Grin

Ooh, and you can make Christmas crackers too, I used to love this in school.
Logged

Mae'r cariad at fy ngwlad yn berwi yn fy ngwaed.

yewberry
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2014, 04:15:33 pm
United States United States

Posts: 2087

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #13: September 19, 2007, 12:42:35 pm »

So, for example, you might talk about a largely secular Christmas-time celebration, but also talk about religious aspects in Christianity, about how Hannukah has taken on larger role in American Judaism, about Kwanzaa, about Yule, etc.

This is my take, too.  I might also touch on how Dia de los Muertos is celebrated in the desert southwest/Texas, and how it corresponds with Halloween.

Brina
Logged
yewberry
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2014, 04:15:33 pm
United States United States

Posts: 2087

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #14: September 19, 2007, 12:57:12 pm »

I was wondering if you have any activities that you might suggest?  Also any and all resources would be highly appreciated for information (wikipedia is my best friend!).

It's a huge flippin' mess (sugar and colored icing everywhere), but we (my homeschool group and I) adore decorating sugar skulls for Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos), a hybrid Christian/pagan celebration indigenous to Mexico, but also big in the border states of the Southwest.  We also make paper marigolds (up here in Washington, it's hard to find fresh marigolds this time of year), which are a huge part of the celebration.  It's a fun, safe way to celebrate our ancestors.

Japanese Buddhism has an ancestral celebration--Obon.  Perhaps you could talk about how the two celebrations are similar and different?

Brina
Logged

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Mountain Biking Meditations... Deity in unusual places « 1 2 3 4 »
Pagan Spirituality
Mandi 47 16891 Last post June 05, 2007, 08:46:32 pm
by Garnet
Avatar Design Challenge: WINNER #1 and Challenge #2 Theme Post « 1 2 »
Art, Poetry and Writing
Beachglass 19 8252 Last post September 05, 2007, 03:50:22 pm
by Juni
Avatar Design Challenge: WINNER #2 and Challenge #3 Theme Post
Art, Poetry and Writing
Beachglass 11 4619 Last post October 14, 2007, 07:08:41 pm
by Beachglass
Avatar Design Challenge: WINNER #3 and Challenge #4 Theme Post « 1 2 »
Art, Poetry and Writing
Beachglass 19 5791 Last post January 14, 2008, 11:57:44 am
by Beachglass
Unusual pictures
Divination SIG
treekisser 1 1428 Last post November 15, 2010, 07:04:06 pm
by knitsy
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.06 seconds with 49 queries.