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Author Topic: Fish?  (Read 9959 times)
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« Reply #15: September 20, 2007, 09:45:12 pm »

What kind of fish have you tried and how have you cooked it? Did you marinate it?

I unfortunately don't remember most of it very well; I tend to get frustrated with it and let a couple of years pass between attempts, so it's been a while for the most part.  The most recent one I think was catfish, breaded and baked, no marinade.  The fish smelled fine when I was preparing it, the breading worked beautifully, the fish was cooked correctly.  But it had this icky lakewater-sludge taste to it.

Come to think of it, I wonder if my previous attempts weren't catfish (which is quite common and pretty cheap around here, so something I'd be likely to be buying) as well, and if the problem isn't just the catfish around here.  It seems like most of what I've tried to cook has had this kind of grey stuff attached that I think is fat deposits, and that's where the nasty flavor tends to hang out--perhaps the fat's picking up the flavor of the local water.  Maybe if I either find a way to remove that or try a different fish I'll have better luck?

Thanks for the suggestions.  I'll keep an eye out for tilapia and see if I have any better luck with it.
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« Reply #16: September 20, 2007, 10:17:21 pm »

Come to think of it, I wonder if my previous attempts weren't catfish (which is quite common and pretty cheap around here, so something I'd be likely to be buying) as well, and if the problem isn't just the catfish around here.


That's quite possible, my father quite catching catfish in Michigan when we were there in the early 60s because it had a horrid taste. Probably from stuff in the water.
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« Reply #17: September 20, 2007, 10:23:29 pm »

I unfortunately don't remember most of it very well; I tend to get frustrated with it and let a couple of years pass between attempts, so it's been a while for the most part.  The most recent one I think was catfish, breaded and baked, no marinade.  The fish smelled fine when I was preparing it, the breading worked beautifully, the fish was cooked correctly.  But it had this icky lakewater-sludge taste to it.

My first thinking is it wasn't cooked quite enough. Since catfish are bottom feeders, their diet tends to come through when they aren't quite done. I had that problem with some last week the first night I used the recipe. The fish was done, but there was just a hint of lakewater taste. The next night, I gave it a couple more minutes, and it was perfect. The recipe called for 6-8 minutes, but the second night was closer to 10. Catfish isn't one of the species you want to go rare with. Smiley

Quote
Come to think of it, I wonder if my previous attempts weren't catfish (which is quite common and pretty cheap around here, so something I'd be likely to be buying) as well, and if the problem isn't just the catfish around here.  It seems like most of what I've tried to cook has had this kind of grey stuff attached that I think is fat deposits, and that's where the nasty flavor tends to hang out--perhaps the fat's picking up the flavor of the local water.  Maybe if I either find a way to remove that or try a different fish I'll have better luck?

That definitely sounds like the fish. I'd certainly give it another try. One thing to avoid is a fish where the skin stays on. If you're anything like me, that is a huge turn-off...which is a shame because we were getting in some nice looking trout, but I couldn't eat the skin. Some fish (salmon, f/ex) can be cooked with the skin on and it peels right off after it's cooked. I don't know what you can get locally at a good price that looks good. Like I mentioned earlier, I'd probably go with tilapia, cod, pollack...they're relatively easy to get filleted and the first two are really versatile (pollack less so because it's more delicate).

Also, if catfish is what you can get easiest, take a look through this site. I was really surprised at the versatility because, to me, catfish is always fried and I don't fry stuff. I know it's a fish I'm going to add in to our diet now that I've got some options.

http://catfishinstitute.com/?q=recipes.html
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« Reply #18: September 20, 2007, 10:32:22 pm »

Something mild, relatively inexpensive (though I realize this will probably vary somewhat according to geography), either baked or broiled or fried, and easy to prepare.

Well, you'll have to wait for it to be on sale for the inexpensive part, but I think salmon is quite easy to cook because it gives a very clear visual indicator of when it's done.  I don't think it's too "strong," but I love fish so I'm probably not the best judge of that.

Anyway, we used to get a bag of frozen (not ideal, but not bad) at Costco for not much, and I'd just broil it.  A little something spread on  top, broil half-way, turn, spread, broil until done.  You know it's done when you slice one open and it's all opaque pink inside (you'll know it when you see it, especially if you look at an undone piece).  Any old bottled sauce will do just fine, too.
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« Reply #19: September 21, 2007, 08:07:47 am »

I had that problem with some last week the first night I used the recipe. The fish was done, but there was just a hint of lakewater taste. The next night, I gave it a couple more minutes, and it was perfect. The recipe called for 6-8 minutes, but the second night was closer to 10.

Huh.  Maybe that was part of my problem.  I'll give it another couple of minutes after I think it's done next time I try it, then, and see if that helps.

Thanks for all the info.  Smiley
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« Reply #20: September 21, 2007, 10:11:04 am »

Huh.  Maybe that was part of my problem.  I'll give it another couple of minutes after I think it's done next time I try it, then, and see if that helps.

Thanks for all the info.  Smiley

I just went back and looked at the recipe. The time they have is 4-6 minutes (and these were fairly thin fillets). At that time they weren't done, so the next night they were in for about 8 and then rested for a minute or two. I generally don't broil, so my temperature might have been off some, but I don't think so.
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« Reply #21: September 21, 2007, 01:58:56 pm »

What kind of fish have you tried and how have you cooked it? Did you marinate it?

All we’ve tried is salmon filets and I’ve tried to cook it about 3 different ways. One way was to wrap it in tin foil and stick it in the barbeque. That was okay but a bit of a pain to do. I’ve also tried to cook it in the oven with veggies, kind of like a pot roast, and that came out not half bad. And then I tried it on the stove top in an iron skillet and ended up burning it in a moment of inattentiveness. I didn’t marinate it and used olive oil and water. Really simple here. I really don’t know what type of fish would be good for us. I guess I’m asking for you to tell me what your favorite fish and recipe is. I’m willing to try anything once.

So, to get to the point, lets go for your favorite way to prepare salmon filets start to finish.
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« Reply #22: September 21, 2007, 02:11:41 pm »

I don't know what you can get locally at a good price that looks good. Like I mentioned earlier, I'd probably go with tilapia, cod, pollack...they're relatively easy to get filleted and the first two are really versatile (pollack less so because it's more delicate).

Also, if catfish is what you can get easiest, take a look through this site. I was really surprised at the versatility because, to me, catfish is always fried and I don't fry stuff. I know it's a fish I'm going to add in to our diet now that I've got some options.

Oh, I like catfish! My grandmother has a breaded catfish recipe I could try and I live right next to some major rivers, so it shouldn’t be hard to get. I also heard that tilapia is a good, mild fish. I’ll try that.

By the way, I live in Missouri USA, right between the Missouri River and the Mississippi River. A bit far for salt water fish but not for some fresh water fish I think.
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« Reply #23: September 21, 2007, 02:16:58 pm »


So, to get to the point, lets go for your favorite way to prepare salmon filets start to finish.

It's funny, I grew up in a place we could catch fish and therefore eat them - but not salmon. since I came here we've been gifted a fair amount of salmon and it's just not my favourite.  Undecided
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« Reply #24: September 21, 2007, 02:22:05 pm »

By the way, I live in Missouri USA, right between the Missouri River and the Mississippi River. A bit far for salt water fish but not for some fresh water fish I think.

*nods*  That's my only reservation about looking for/trying tilapia.  Google informs me that it's a salt water fish, so it might be more expensive, or at least not as fresh, here in Indiana.  But we'll see.
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« Reply #25: September 21, 2007, 02:23:59 pm »

First, Boots is adorable!!! And I'm sure he(she?) would like to try any kind of fish you bring home.   Cheesy

As others have suggested, there are lots of options out there.  Is there any kind of fish that you've had that you liked?  If so, trying to find a similar recipe to what you've had may be a good starting point.  Then branch out from there.

Personally, I'm partial to catfish and trout, but that's mostly because they're relatively easy to get fresh where I live.   Somewhere in the chaos that is my kitchen, I have a recipe for baked pecan-encrusted catfish that I love... somewhere.

Thank you, Aisling. Boots was being very patient with me while I took that picture. Weirdly enough, she doesn’t like human food. She won’t even eat raw chicken or beef when offered. Boots is the only cat I know that won’t take table scraps at the first opportunity.

If you wish to brave that kitchen of yours, I would love the baked catfish recipe? If, you know, you have time and all that. [pouts]
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« Reply #26: September 21, 2007, 03:37:24 pm »

So, to get to the point, lets go for your favorite way to prepare salmon filets start to finish.

OK. I don't have one recipe that's a favorite, but I do have a few I use depending on what else I want to serve. I'll post them in another post.
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« Reply #27: September 21, 2007, 03:41:32 pm »

So, to get to the point, lets go for your favorite way to prepare salmon filets start to finish.

This one I fiddle with. Sometimes more sauce. Sometimes more capers. Just depends on my mood.

Baked Salmon with Capers

Ingredients
4 approximately 6 oz. pieces of salmon fillet, center cut
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoons lemon juice
Salt and black pepper
2 tablespoons of parsley, chopped

Set rack in middle of oven and heat oven to 350º.   

Spray oven dish with cooking spray.

Place fillet pieces on sheet or dish; if the fillet has skin, place the skin side up.  Bake for 18-20 minutes.

Mix olive oil, lemon juice, and capers in a small bowl.

When salmon is done, remove to plates.  If the fillet pieces have skin, remove the skin, and turn over on plate.  Grind a little sea salt and black pepper over each..  Spoon some of the caper topping over each fillet piece.  Sprinkle with parsley.  Serve.
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« Reply #28: September 21, 2007, 03:42:34 pm »


BOWTIE PASTA WITH SALMON AND LEMON-DILL-VODKA SAUCE


1 medium onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 cup milk (I used 1% milk)
2 tablespoons margarine
1/3 cup vodka
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons corn starch dissolved in cold water
1 tablespoon dillweed
1 1/2 teaspoons finely grated fresh lemon zest
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
2 cups flaked broiled salmon
1 box bowtie pasta cooked al dente

If you want to split this meal up into more than one night, you’ll want to divide your sauce up and not add salmon until the night you’re going to serve it. Adjust the amount of pasta accordingly.

Cook onion in oil in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened (but not browned), about 6 minutes.

Add broth, milk, vodka, margarine and salt and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is reduced to 2 cups, 40 to 50 minutes. Add cornstarch slurry and stir into mixture. Bring to a simmer and allow to thicken. If sauce is too thin, add more dissolved cornstarch.

Remove from heat and stir in dill, lemon zest and juice, and pepper. Before serving add salmon to saucepan and cook over moderately low heat until fish is just heated through, 2 to 3 minutes.

While fish is heating, cook pasta in a 6- to 8-quart pot of boiling salted water until al dente. Divide cooked pasta onto plates and top with salmon sauce.

Makes 4 servings.

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« Reply #29: September 21, 2007, 03:43:32 pm »



 Honey-Soy Salmon

4 servings

2 tbsp   green onion, white and green parts sliced
4 tbsp   reduced-sodium soy sauce
2 tbsp   rice vinegar
2 tbsp   honey
2 tsp      minced fresh ginger
4 6-8 oz   salmon fillets, 3/4 inch thick
2 tsp      toasted sesame seeds

Oven 350

Whisk green onion, soy sauce, vinegar, honey and ginger in a medium bowl until the honey is dissolved. Place salmon in a sealable plastic bag, add 3 tablespoons of the sauce and refrigerate; let marinate for 15 minutes. Reserve the remaining sauce.

 Line a small baking pan with foil and coat with cooking spray. Transfer the salmon to the pan, skinned-side down. (Discard the marinade.) Bake the salmon for about 15 minutes. Remove salmon to plates and remove/discard skin. Drizzle with the reserved sauce and garnish with sesame seeds.

Baked Salmon with Crumb Topping

1 cup soft bread crumbs
1/3 cup sliced almonds, coarsely chopped
1 tbsp finely chopped green onion
1/2 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 tbsp margarine, melted
1 tbsp lemon juice
4 6 oz salmon fillets (skin off)
Salt and pepper to taste
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 375

Wash salmon and pat dry. Place salmon in baking dish coated with cooking spray. Salt and pepper salmon. Spray salmon lightly with cooking spray so topping will stick.

In a bowl, combine the bread crumbs, almonds, onion, thyme, salt and pepper. Mix well. Melt butter and add lemon juice. Stir well and then add to bread crumb mixture and mix thoroughly.

Cover fillets with crumb mixture.

Bake uncovered for 20-25 minutes or until fish flakes easily.

Serves 4
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