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Author Topic: Homegrown Solstice Traditions  (Read 7481 times)
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« Topic Start: December 05, 2007, 10:17:11 am »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

I'd like to hear how others incorporate their newer (to most families, at least) Pagan traditions with older Christian-oriented family traditions.  In our house we've noticed the most meaningful family traditions had nothing much to do with Christianity to begin with.  So mincemeat pastries continue to be served in this household without abatement and the customs of my parents' respective families have been combined in ours (his: mincemeat pies with dinner, hers: cinnamon buns for breakfast, and ours: mincemeat buns for dinner and breakfast).  Every year now we hold a solstice vigil party at which we serve a big crockpot full of hot mulled wine which becomes integral in a sumbel-like drinking rite around midnight.  Hats are filled with treats for our Santa figure (haven't worked that out yet) and left under the altar, to be found in the morning filled with all our gifts.  (We don't happen to do a tree in our household, although a potted rosemary cone makes an annual appearance.)

In an old is new again twist, we don't give many gifts, but the one we give to my parents' household from each year out is a goose ala Scrooge.  This year it's just the one goose because finances are tight, but the plan is to grow the tradition by giving a Christmas goose to all the various households we exchange gifts with plus a pair of geese (or substitute) to the needy either directly to a family hitting a rough patch or through Heifer Project.
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« Reply #1: December 05, 2007, 04:40:23 pm »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

<shrug>  I'm the only practicing pagan in my family.  I sometimes have a solstice party, but this year I don't have time.  We generally celebrate a nominal, secularized Christmas, but it doesn't involve gift-giving.

My personal traditions aren't family/group oriented, so I didn't think to mention them.  Besides, they're quite similar to the rituals I do for my other holy days (seasonally-appropriate offerings to the land spirits, fire, etc.).

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« Reply #2: December 05, 2007, 05:42:29 pm »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

I'd like to hear how others incorporate their newer (to most families, at least) Pagan traditions with older Christian-oriented family traditions.  In our house we've noticed the most meaningful family traditions had nothing much to do with Christianity to begin with.  So mincemeat pastries continue to be served in this household without abatement and the customs of my parents' respective families have been combined in ours (his: mincemeat pies with dinner, hers: cinnamon buns for breakfast, and ours: mincemeat buns for dinner and breakfast).  Every year now we hold a solstice vigil party at which we serve a big crockpot full of hot mulled wine which becomes integral in a sumbel-like drinking rite around midnight.  Hats are filled with treats for our Santa figure (haven't worked that out yet) and left under the altar, to be found in the morning filled with all our gifts.  (We don't happen to do a tree in our household, although a potted rosemary cone makes an annual appearance.)

In an old is new again twist, we don't give many gifts, but the one we give to my parents' household from each year out is a goose ala Scrooge.  This year it's just the one goose because finances are tight, but the plan is to grow the tradition by giving a Christmas goose to all the various households we exchange gifts with plus a pair of geese (or substitute) to the needy either directly to a family hitting a rough patch or through Heifer Project.

We do pretty much everything that I can come up with.  We have a menorah friends gave us we light it properly (but without the prayers), discuss what it means to the jews, how it's changed because of christmas, and then move off into a discussion on prejudice (read One Candle, by Bunting and Popp, I can't get through it without crying and then one called The Christmas Menorahs).  We fill shoes with candy on the 6th of december (germany) and the 6th of January (spain), make Lucia buns for the 13th (scandinavia), get a family game or two for yule , open a present on christmas eve, (germany), secular christmas decorations for christmas, christmas presents with grandma, Yule decorations on the altar, Hogmany with a small present (Scotland), and we play around the the twelve days.  Basically we do something holiday related to something from thanksgiving to Epiphany.  Anything we are ethnically or historically religiously related to, we have fun with. (I take what would have been in their stockings originally and spread it around alot.)  We talk about what christmas means to christians since I have a nativity scene and the kids insist on putting it up, but the 'celebration' is strictly secular..

Solstice specific, we make wish buns (monkey bread) (I love the book CIrcle Round), I take the previous night off work, we get up earlier and go see the sun, we come home and eat, get out the games that I got for yUle, and generally have fun, read stories and so on.  This year, we got invited to a soltice party, and we might go for a while.  My group has a ritual.

ALthough this year we got lazy and didn't put up the tree.  Just the yule log and stockings and my santa's and my russian santas,the grinch, the gnome and you get the drift.
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« Reply #3: December 05, 2007, 05:45:31 pm »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

I'm not sure that there ever would be an abundance of winter solstice threads, since it's only winter solstice for half the world.   Smiley  Also, there is the fact that many pagans don't celebrate solstice/Yule at all.

Like yewberry, I'm the only pagan in the family, so our family traditions this time of year have nothing to do with solstice.  Even if I ever have my own family, I don't see us trying to incorporate family Christmas traditions with Yule traditions.  Personally, I rather like the idea of keeping some separation between the two.  We'll bake Christmas cookies and give gifts as per family tradition, but will also start some very separate traditions for celebrating the change of season. 
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« Reply #4: December 05, 2007, 05:57:44 pm »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!



I celebrate both Winter Solstice and Christmas, though separately. I grew up celebrating Christmas with the rest of my agnostic/atheist family, and for us it's a purely secular holiday. So we'll gather, feast, and exchange gifts on the actual day (I'm in charge of organizing it this year...ugh).

Winter solstice is the religious festival of the season for me, and since my boyfriend is nominally Buddhist, I celebrate alone. On the longest night of the year, I light a candle at sunset, and the candle and I both have to keep going all night, until dawn.

I get a huge wreath every year, which to me is as much a pagan decoration of the season as it is Christian. My boyfriend *has* to have an Xmas tree; way too much bother for me, but he's getting one as a surprise tonight (he thought we couldn't fit one into the new layout of the apartment this year). My little way of spreading holiday cheer.
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« Reply #5: December 05, 2007, 07:24:59 pm »

I'm not sure that there ever would be an abundance of winter solstice threads, since it's only winter solstice for half the world.   Smiley  Also, there is the fact that many pagans don't celebrate solstice/Yule at all. 

Very true this - it's a little hot for me to have a Yule log/bonfire, even assuming we were permitted to light fires at this time of year (outdoors at least). I'm also one of those who doesn't really celebrate the solstices.

My family does celebrate Christmas, but it's a secular holiday for us, and more about getting the family together and giving to one another than anything else (Personally, I love giving presents that the receiver is delighted with - It gives me the biggest kick to know I picked something they really wanted!).

We generally celebrate lunch in my parents household, as both my brothers have dinner with their partners families. One big seafood entree, followed by some quick and east roast that mum usually comes up with, and liberal quantities of alcohol (for those not driving).

There's usually a Christmas tree, although one year my mother did 'forget', and we got a "Christmas Potplant" instead (complete with tinsel and baubles). It actually suited the purpose quite well, I will say, since the presents all fitted neatly underneath!
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« Reply #6: December 05, 2007, 07:49:58 pm »

I'd like to hear how others incorporate their newer (to most families, at least) Pagan traditions with older Christian-oriented family traditions.

I grew up to celebrate Christmas, not for the religious aspect of it, but just the whole 'santa leaving presents under the Christmas tree' theme that a lot of non-Christian families are into when they have children.

When I then discovered my beliefs I found it quite easy to incorporate them into what I had already been celebrating since a child. Bringing evergreens into the house, for instance, originated from Scandinavia and is rather Germanic-Pagan in it's origins. I find it rather humourous that a lot of Christians will have a Christmas tree in their house actually, because the Bible warns against it. It says it's heathen. *chuckles to self*

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« Reply #7: December 06, 2007, 12:14:06 am »

There's usually a Christmas tree, although one year my mother did 'forget', and we got a "Christmas Potplant" instead (complete with tinsel and baubles). It actually suited the purpose quite well, I will say, since the presents all fitted neatly underneath!

Actually, that's what we do more or less.  We buy a rosemary "Christmas tree" that's cone shaped and decorate with colorful slips of paper or ribbons containing our wishes and pledges for the year.  I didn't think it would become a tradition since I never considered myself a tree person, but we've found ourselves looking forward to it.  It's the centerpiece of our solstice tradition.  Then I discovered that the first Christmas trees in England, even for Queen Victoria's family, was a little potted evergreen not much different.  It makes me very happy.

The trick with rosemary plants like this is they force it to develop a very dense rootball to get that formation.  It needs to be pulled out, oaked over night in the bathtub and repoted with excellent drainage, cutting an "x" in the bottom of the root ball before you put it in, for it to stand a chance.  Soak once every three days and give plenty of sun.  That should keep it alive.
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« Reply #8: December 06, 2007, 03:25:37 am »

Actually, that's what we do more or less.  We buy a rosemary "Christmas tree" that's cone shaped and decorate with colorful slips of paper or ribbons containing our wishes and pledges for the year.

I really quite like this idea - I might have to steal it *snip* Grin
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« Reply #9: December 06, 2007, 08:17:35 am »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

Add me to the list of "only Pagan in the family, and don't celebrate Yule anyway".  I do celebrate Christmas with my family, though, and all the usual secular trimmings.  I decorate our house with a tree and garlands and whatnot, I listen to Christmas music (a lot of it is religious, yes, but I don't feel that I need to agree with what it's saying to appreciate it as music), I buy and wrap and give presents, I send out cards (note to self:  remember to send out cards soon).  Next year, we'll probably start doing Santa stuff for our daughter.  (She'll be five months old this Christmas.  She's just figured out she's got hands.  We figure Santa's a little beyond her comprehension yet.)  We do the whole traditional going-to-Grandma's-house thing.  Etc., etc.

Sometimes, though not always, I will go to the Christmas Eve vigil service at my mother's and husband's church.  I file that under the same heading as the religious music; it's not my religion, so I don't tend to participate that much in the service, but I love being there and watching it and being in the midst of a beautiful religious ceremony, even if it's not my religion.

None of which, of course, is actually celebrating the solstice.  It's as close as I come anymore, though.  In the past, I used to mark the solstice sometimes, usually in very simple ways, more being aware than actually doing much of anything.  I figured, if nothing else, I follow a solar deity so it's appropriate to celebrate the sun's return.  Lately, though, as my path drifts more and more Hellenic, it just hasn't felt to me like doing this kind of thing really fits anymore.  So I haven't.
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« Reply #10: December 06, 2007, 09:28:47 am »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

I don't have a lot of personal Solstice traditions - yet, anyway. Got divorced 2 years ago, was living with housemates (who are Pagan, but who also do secular Christmas to a degree that I'm not inclined to), and anyway, the last several years I've been flying out to see my mother and brother and his family on Christmas day. (Well, last year, Mom and I were in Europe together, but that's a special occasion.) which adds some complications.

Good friends have a Solstice party as close to the night of the solstice as feasible (this year, we get to the actual night, and because it's Friday, the party will be going from about 5 to midnight.) I very much want to get up to see the dawn in on the next morning, however briefly.

Now I'm in my own place, I'm still trying to decide what I feel about decorations - which ones really will, legitimately, make me happy, and be safe, and be cat-appropriate, and are worth the effort? Don't have an easy answer to that yet. (Also, I don't significantly decorate for other Sabbats: what makes Winter Solstice different? I might have a few things out - fresh flowers when I can afford them, fall fruits and veggies, etc. but they're more a 'hey, nice seasonal stuff' than 'went out of my way to specially decorate'.)
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« Reply #11: December 06, 2007, 10:36:07 am »

What?  No abundance of winter solstice threads?  Were we all dutifully waiting for December only to find ourselves too busy to post?  We have to remedy this!

LOL, this may be one of those 'be careful what you ask for' things!  The Winter Solstice is my favorite time of year.  I am utterly indiscriminate in rolling together every bit of revelry and tradition I have ever run into....and have done so since my marriage over three decades ago.  My childhood Christmases were hell in red and green and I early decided to revitalize and create something in a better image.

When my children were small, and I was trying to be a Christian, we had wonderful celebrations of every faith I could find.  They loved Hannuka candles and small gifts each night as we lit the tapers celebrating the re-taking of the Jewish temple.  I explained that it really, for us, was not about the Jews throwing the Greeks out of their temple, but about keeping the human spirit alight in the face of adversity.  And it was to teach some religious tolerance---didn't want some anti-semite sorts getting first crack at my children's ideas about Judaism.  We also celebrated another long festival---nine days, from American Indian lore.  Although in no way "authentic" it was again aimed at teaching respect for other traditions---so "Soyal" from the American Southwest was celebrated with tiny painted kachina cookies and food from that area of the country. 
I baked every day in December and put the resulting sweets into decorative tins on the formal table....they were sacrosanct until the Eve of the "Day"....whether it was Christmas or as now...Yule.

I still bake, but the cans can be broached from "Mothers Night" on...Dec 20th.  We usually have at least three large celebratory dinners...on Mothers' Night with a very intimate list, on Solstice Eve---usually family and very dear friends, and then another dinner with the remains of a small pagan group on whatever weekend falls close to Solstice. 

I decorate the entire house with the collection of these many years, a large golden Sun face adorns some dominant spot and lights are a big focus, as are candles.  Music of the season includes all kinds of carols, even Christian ones.  For me, it is the season of Light----and even tho' I am very unChristian, the legend of the Christ was still initially about light, the metaphor works where the Church did not.  So I see no reason to exclude what always struck me as the music of tender longing and reaching. 

As for ritual?  Well, this is about igniting all the new fires of family and self....my other pagan friends usually do a somewhat wiccanized rite prior to their fancy dress dinner.  But for me...every day moving with lights and ornaments a-glitter and music playing IS the rite of ignition and warmth that this sabbat means for me.  I buy or make a very special hemispherical candle that glows as it burns....and we burn it from Solstice thru the 1st of January...that is about as ritual as it gets.  And I decided this year, re-evaluating my own practice in light of some recent events, that I have been what someone told me was "fallow"....as an observance, since my year's end at Samhain, so yes, the Yuletide does END that and re-begin my year. 

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« Reply #12: December 07, 2007, 10:16:17 am »

(Transplanting a quote from the "Solar Cycle Ritual?" thread, so as not to hijack that topic)

I'm gonna try the stay up all night idea, possibly add, no lights allowed until sunrise. It seems like a fun idea though! But I'm not yet sure they make perfect sense to me yet. I'll probably just do it for the fun aspect!

-Tj

It's definitely fun, but a bit grueling in the final hour or two before sunrise. I usually start preparing a big celebratory breakfast around that time, which helps keep me awake.

Let me know how it goes. I've never done it with no lights allowed; it sounds impractical (and I would *definitely* fall asleep under those conditions!), but it could be cool, too.

And recognize that you'll be a bit of a mess the next day; your internal time clock will be off, and even with a post-dawn nap you'll be sleep-deprived. It takes a bit of time to recover. (So don't have anything requiring you to be 100% scheduled for that following day.)
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« Reply #13: December 07, 2007, 04:32:07 pm »

(Transplanting a quote from the "Solar Cycle Ritual?" thread, so as not to hijack that topic)

It's definitely fun, but a bit grueling in the final hour or two before sunrise. I usually start preparing a big celebratory breakfast around that time, which helps keep me awake.

Let me know how it goes. I've never done it with no lights allowed; it sounds impractical (and I would *definitely* fall asleep under those conditions!), but it could be cool, too.

And recognize that you'll be a bit of a mess the next day; your internal time clock will be off, and even with a post-dawn nap you'll be sleep-deprived. It takes a bit of time to recover. (So don't have anything requiring you to be 100% scheduled for that following day.)

I'm thinking of staying up all night too, but I'm not sure how I'm going to entertain myself.  14 hours and 59 minutes in the dark! 

I was thinking candles instead of lightbulbs, but hmm, you're right, sleep might win that way.
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« Reply #14: December 07, 2007, 05:37:42 pm »

(Transplanting a quote from the "Solar Cycle Ritual?" thread, so as not to hijack that topic)

It's definitely fun, but a bit grueling in the final hour or two before sunrise. I usually start preparing a big celebratory breakfast around that time, which helps keep me awake.

Let me know how it goes. I've never done it with no lights allowed; it sounds impractical (and I would *definitely* fall asleep under those conditions!), but it could be cool, too.

And recognize that you'll be a bit of a mess the next day; your internal time clock will be off, and even with a post-dawn nap you'll be sleep-deprived. It takes a bit of time to recover. (So don't have anything requiring you to be 100% scheduled for that following day.)

I'm a university student. So I'm used to the whole all nighter thing. Although I am just recovering from Hypersomnia, so i'm not so sure I can do it that easily anymore. Although I never said anything about TV or Computer. Plus I should probably practice staying up late for when I get back to Uni!

-Tj
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