The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
April 03, 2020, 01:10:05 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 03, 2020, 01:10:05 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: Charity as religious practice  (Read 6621 times)
Hyacinth Belle
Adept Member
*****
*
Last Login:December 03, 2011, 01:02:54 pm
United States United States

Religion: Heathen/Taoist
TCN ID: Hyacinth_Belle
Posts: 1217


Making my sun run...

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15: December 22, 2007, 06:44:54 pm »

On the other hand, it's ok that your religion doesn't speak to charity.
Thanks. I think it's great for people to do that, but I do not feel any sort of call to follow suit. *shrug*
Logged

"She who stands on tiptoe / doesn't stand firm. / She who rushes ahead / doesn't go far. / She who tries to shine / dims her own light. / She who defines herself / can't know who she really is. / She who has power over others / can't empower herself. / She who clings to her work / will create nothing that endures. / If you want to accord with the Tao, / just do your job, then let go." ~ Tao Te Ching, chp. 24

"Silent and thoughtful a prince's son should be / and bold in fighting; / cheerful and merry every man should be / until he waits for death." ~ Havamal, stanza 15

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

sailor_tech
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:July 06, 2011, 04:43:27 pm
United States United States

Religion: Jewish
Posts: 3564

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #16: December 22, 2007, 07:03:01 pm »


Charity is a funny old word though. I think a lot of people put 'charity' down as being an organization of some sort that is set up to help one particular area of life- orphaned children, poverty, endangered animals. But I have always viewed charity down as the action of 'showing love'. 

For what it's worth, the Hebrew word is "tzedakah" is usually used for charity. It's more exact meaning is "justice, fairness, rightousness".  There are eight levels of tzedakah. 

Also, of interest to the recons, it's taken the place of animal sacrifice.
Logged
FunkyDemon
Journeyman
***
Last Login:July 08, 2011, 11:00:11 am
Canada Canada

Religion: Heathen
TCN ID: FunkyDemon
Posts: 143


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #17: December 22, 2007, 07:26:01 pm »

In relation to the thread on favorite charities.

Is charity considered a requirement in your religion?  Does the type of charity matter?



No, charity is not a requirement in my religion.  But there isn't much in the way of dogma or requirements.  When I was looking for a religion I wasn't looking for any 'thou shall' or 'shall nots', so such meaningless requirements would automatically make me move on.

However, if 'charity' is required, I don't think it is still charity but a simple fulfillment of obligation.  You aren't doing it to do good or be nice or any of that, you are doing because you have to.  Someone that does charity for no reason other than to help others is showing real charity.
Logged
Mari
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:October 10, 2010, 03:39:46 pm
United States United States

Posts: 1160

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #18: December 22, 2007, 08:13:18 pm »

Ah, no go on that one! I am *deathly* phobic of hypodermic needles and IVs. I'm not even going to say more than that about the subject... just the suggestion is starting to freak me out.

Aside from the point that not everybody should be or could/can be donating blood in the first place...
Logged
Marilyn (ABSENTMINDED)
Assistant Board Coordinator
Senior Staff
High Adept Member
****
Last Login:February 06, 2013, 08:12:28 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: free-flowing animist, Dudeist Priest
TCN ID: Absentminded
Posts: 2725


Blog entries (11)


« Reply #19: December 22, 2007, 08:44:06 pm »


However, if 'charity' is required, I don't think it is still charity but a simple fulfillment of obligation.  You aren't doing it to do good or be nice or any of that, you are doing because you have to.  Someone that does charity for no reason other than to help others is showing real charity.

Personally, I would judge 'real' charity by its results.  Fulfilling an obligation of charity by joining an outreach group and giving gloves  and blankets to street people has the result of fewer street people dying of exposure.  Satisfying a desire to help people by joining an outreach group and giving gloves  and blankets to street people has the result of fewer street people dying of exposure.  The motivation behind joining this group and providing these articles is irrelevant.  The people have been helped and that is the point and purpose of the exercise.

If people feel obligated to give, whether by their religion, their social class, the clubs they belong to, etc., I will honour them just as highly as the people who feel no obligation to give and do it anyway.  Once the gift has left their hand, or the tree is in the ground, or the gloves belong to the recipient, where and why they came doesn't matter.  Charity has happened.

The only time I have a problem with charity, whatever prompts it, is when it comes with strings.  'You can have this food, but you have to listen to my sermon/political speech/rant while you eat' is not charity but commerce.  I can listen to you in exchange for this food, but don't kid yourself that you have 'given' me something.  You have 'sold' it to me.

The mayor-in-waiting who gives a truckload of stuff to the food bank because it's a good photo-op?  Thank you.  People will be fed.  They may still not vote for you, but that's what makes it charity instead of commerce.  You can't enforce any implied string, and your motivation doesn't matter.  Charity has happened, and at least you picked this way to get your phot-op instead of all the ways you could have done it that wouldn't have helped anybody.

I have no problem with encoding charity as social or religious obligation.

Absent
Logged

"There's nothing wrong with you that reincarnation won't cure."
- Jack E. Leonard

Blessed are the cracked, for it is they who let in the light.

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack, a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in

L Cohen
sailor_tech
High Adept Member
******
Last Login:July 06, 2011, 04:43:27 pm
United States United States

Religion: Jewish
Posts: 3564

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #20: December 22, 2007, 09:03:19 pm »


If people feel obligated to give, whether by their religion, their social class, the clubs they belong to, etc., I will honour them just as highly as the people who feel no obligation to give and do it anyway. 

Absent

I'm going to comment that what you describe is described in the levels of tzedakah I mentioned earlier. The least meritious is to give begrudedly. The next to highest is to give where neither the donor or recipient know either's identity. The highest is to give to make the recipient self-sufficient. Note though that all are honorable, far beyond Not giving anything.


Logged
Juniper
Adept Member
*****
*
Last Login:January 06, 2011, 05:33:35 pm
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Religion: Hedgewitch with Neo-Wiccan leanings
TCN ID: Juniper
Posts: 1742


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #21: December 22, 2007, 09:10:35 pm »

The only time I have a problem with charity, whatever prompts it, is when it comes with strings.  'You can have this food, but you have to listen to my sermon/political speech/rant while you eat' is not charity but commerce.  I can listen to you in exchange for this food, but don't kid yourself that you have 'given' me something.  You have 'sold' it to me.

Yes, I feel the same. IMO, if somebody does this when giving 'charity', then it isn't charity at all. Something is only given charitably if the giver doesn't expect anything back.
Logged

'How she longed for winter then!-
Scrupulously austere in its order
Of white and black
Ice and rock; each sentiment within border,
And heart's frosty discipline
Exact as a snowflake'
~Sylvia Plath
Whiterabbit
Apprentice
**
Last Login:April 14, 2008, 07:19:18 pm
Sweden Sweden

Religion: Cottage/Green/Hedgewitch-mix
Posts: 38


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #22: April 07, 2008, 08:25:03 am »

Its not required as far as I know. To me , its sometimes common sense to give if I can. But not just money to charitable causes. I can give of myself, of my time. Sometimes its enough just to be present and aware.
 My personal ethics on this is, giving and sharing is  good. It makes me feel good. It may not change the world, but its basically good and adds to the overall good in the world. Its very simple really.
I have had some trouble trusting some organizations that wants your money for this and that, and I always been rather poor, so quite frankly I have not been able to donate. I worked for free to help homeless and poor people, through organizations that runs second-hand stores. But as I said, I didn't always trust that the money from this ended up in the right places...
My religion does not require it, but my overall philosophy does. So I felt an urge to do something after seeing how the gorillas are sometimes treated in Virunga. My husband and I decided to "adopt" one gorilla, so we did (from the Dian Fossey foundation). I think I want to do more things like that in the future.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2008, 08:31:30 am by Whiterabbit » Logged
Allstar
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:June 19, 2009, 03:05:02 pm
United States United States

Religion: Wicca
Posts: 89


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23: April 07, 2008, 12:38:21 pm »


I see volunteering and giving donations as a way to serve the Divine.  I think that divinity can be found in every person, and by serving people, I am also serving the Divine. 

If that makes sense.  Smiley

I never thought of volunteering as a requirement for myself as part of my religious practice, but it's something I've done for years and plan on continuing indefinitely. 
Logged

Lunamoth42
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:July 09, 2011, 10:56:08 am
United States United States

Religion: New Age-influenced Celtic Polytheist & Kitchen Witch
Posts: 84


First, there was nothing. Then it exploded.

Blog entries (0)

Lunamoth42
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24: May 02, 2008, 10:19:23 am »

In relation to the thread on favorite charities.

Is charity considered a requirement in your religion?  Does the type of charity matter?

As I'm still definining my religion... path... thing... it's, well, at present undefined.

That said, I do find charitable acts very important, and will probably work it into whatever I end up defining as my religious practice. 

The strange thing is, my job IS a charity.  I'm paid for the hours I work, obviously, but where I work is a 501c3 charitable organization whose sole purpose (albiet a state mandated one) is to distribute grant funds and/or provide much-needed equipment and continuing education opportunities to area trauma centers and responder organizations.  Some days I forget about "charity" and think only "paperwork and beaurocratic junk".  So I don't know where that all fits in to charitable acts, per se.
Logged

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Army charity hoards millions
Non-Religious News
mlr52 5 1967 Last post February 24, 2009, 12:42:53 pm
by LyricFox
Pope Criticizes Paganism in Encyclical on Love & Charity « 1 2 3 4 »
Religious News
Waldfrau 47 7232 Last post July 15, 2009, 10:44:39 pm
by Artur
How many practice magic seperate from their religious beliefs
Magic and the Occult for Beginners
jafa 11 3681 Last post November 01, 2009, 04:27:07 pm
by Satsekhem
Help please? (Fitting religious practice into a busy life)
Faith in Everyday Life
Rocquelaire 9 2941 Last post December 15, 2010, 04:16:21 pm
by Rocquelaire
Charity
Faith in Everyday Life
Siya 12 3183 Last post August 18, 2010, 06:37:42 pm
by Jenett
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.187 seconds with 46 queries.