The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
September 20, 2020, 09:54:45 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 20, 2020, 09:54:45 am

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: Potted herb garden-help!  (Read 5844 times)
mandy1216
Journeyman
***
Last Login:February 15, 2011, 02:13:39 pm
United States United States

Religion: Wiccan
Posts: 137


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Topic Start: May 01, 2008, 02:36:09 pm »

I'm used to planting in the ground, and not having to deal with pots.  I live in the Chicago now, however, and only have a deck. Last year, I only planted a few herbs, stuck mostly to pansies and petunias to see how they fared in our combo of very direct/then no sunlight.

Any suggestions for keeping a vivacious potted herb garden alive?
Logged

Jim Halpert:     We didn't play many video games in Scranton. Instead we'd do stuff like.. uh, Pam and I would sometimes hum the same high pitched note and try to get Dwight to make an appointment with an ear doctor. And, uh, Pam called it... Pretendinitis.

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

Lunamoth42
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:July 09, 2011, 10:56:08 am
United States United States

Religion: New Age-influenced Celtic Polytheist & Kitchen Witch
Posts: 84


First, there was nothing. Then it exploded.

Blog entries (0)

Lunamoth42
WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1: May 01, 2008, 06:02:58 pm »

I'm used to planting in the ground, and not having to deal with pots.  I live in the Chicago now, however, and only have a deck. Last year, I only planted a few herbs, stuck mostly to pansies and petunias to see how they fared in our combo of very direct/then no sunlight.

Any suggestions for keeping a vivacious potted herb garden alive?

Read up on what those particular plants need with regard to soil composition and watering.  Make sure the pots aren't squishing the roots; i.e. plant into a pot that looks somewhat bigger than needs be, because the plant needs room to spread its toes out.  You might need to feed them too since there's no rocks to provide mineral content in pots.  I've got basil, mint, oregano, and lavender growing quite well on my back porch.
Logged
yewberry
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2014, 04:15:33 pm
United States United States

Posts: 2087

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #2: May 01, 2008, 07:07:24 pm »

Any suggestions for keeping a vivacious potted herb garden alive?

So how much direct sun does you deck get?  And at what time of day?  Most common herbs are Mediterranean in origin and require quite a bit of sunlight to thrive.  If you've got a north- or east-facing deck, I wouldn't expect too much from your herb garden.  That's not to say you shouldn't try, but odds are things will limp along rather than thrive.  You might be able to get away with herbs that like cooler weather/moist soil (that might benefit from low light when the temperature rises).  Most members of the celery family fit this bill (dill, parsley, cilantro, lovage) might be your best bet for a really shady spot.

Brina
Logged
mandy1216
Journeyman
***
Last Login:February 15, 2011, 02:13:39 pm
United States United States

Religion: Wiccan
Posts: 137


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #3: May 02, 2008, 10:45:42 am »

So how much direct sun does you deck get?  And at what time of day?  Most common herbs are Mediterranean in origin and require quite a bit of sunlight to thrive.  If you've got a north- or east-facing deck, I wouldn't expect too much from your herb garden.  That's not to say you shouldn't try, but odds are things will limp along rather than thrive.  You might be able to get away with herbs that like cooler weather/moist soil (that might benefit from low light when the temperature rises).  Most members of the celery family fit this bill (dill, parsley, cilantro, lovage) might be your best bet for a really shady spot.

Brina

I'm an east facer, so I am going to have to be creative.

Thank you!
Logged

Jim Halpert:     We didn't play many video games in Scranton. Instead we'd do stuff like.. uh, Pam and I would sometimes hum the same high pitched note and try to get Dwight to make an appointment with an ear doctor. And, uh, Pam called it... Pretendinitis.
Drunementon
Journeyman
***
Last Login:October 24, 2010, 01:17:36 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: Moderate Celtic Recon
Posts: 140

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #4: May 02, 2008, 06:13:22 pm »

I'm used to planting in the ground, and not having to deal with pots.  I live in the Chicago now, however, and only have a deck. Last year, I only planted a few herbs, stuck mostly to pansies and petunias to see how they fared in our combo of very direct/then no sunlight. Any suggestions for keeping a vivacious potted herb garden alive?

I had herbs on a north facing balcony that was open to west sun as well.  What matters is the number of hours of sunlight you get, and how much wind you get.  6 hours means full sunlight, 3-6 is partial sunlight and less than three is considered shady.  So, although my balcony faced north, I got 5 1/2 hours of sun from the west in the summer, meaning I had a high-end partial sunlight situation. 

My deck now faces east, but is open to the south.  So in the summer I get between 5 and six hours of direct sunlight.  With this exposure, I grow pretty much any herb I want in a pot... sage, rosemary, oregano, thyme and so on...  In fact, Basil loves the deck, and lavender, that most sun-loving of herbs, does really well.

I use good sized pots with a thin layer of gravel at the bottom for drainage (very important...  herbs do not like wet feet and your pots must have a hole at the bottom to allow for proper drainage when it storms).  I use a 50/50 mix of potting soil and garden humus...  we get a lot of wind and the biggest danger to herbs, next to poor drainage, is dessicated roots or leaves from wind or uneven watering.  So, because of my circumstances, I use a heavier potting mix that holds water longer.  If your aspect is very shady, or you get a lot of moisture, plain old potting soil will do.  I don't like commercial plant fertilizers as a rule, but herbs can exhaust the nutrients in the soil especially late in the year.  I solve that problem by adding bone meal, and occassionally, late in the season, watering with a mild fertilizer such as Miracle Grow.   

Basil is very prone to wind damage, especially when transplanted.  Once it toughens up, though, it can take a lot of punishment.  I use plastic coke bottles over the plants for the first week or two, to give the stems a chance to strengthen.  Also, basil is fussy about temperature.  Night time lows under 40F causes them to turn brown or slows their growth...  And they don't like to dry out completely (which also causes leaves to turn brown).  Most other herbs are pretty much self-sustaining as long as they have a steady supply of water (if you aren't sure when to water, push your finger into the soil to the first knuckle...  if the soil is dry, water away).

Don't hesitate to pinch off the growing tips of Sage, Rosemary, Basil or oregano...  especially when they are young.  This will cause the plants to bush out, creating two branches at the point of the pinch.  You'll end up with a much bigger plant if you do, 

If you are under 5 hours of sunlight a day, many herbs will struggle a bit.  Sage, Thyme, Rosemary and Oregano will do okay, but if you are under 4 hours, even they will struggle.   
Logged
Thesaly
Journeyman
***
Last Login:May 13, 2008, 06:10:33 pm
United States United States

Religion: Ecclectic Wiccan (for now)
Posts: 133


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #5: May 02, 2008, 07:28:32 pm »

Basil is very prone to wind damage, especially when transplanted. 

Last time I tried to grow herbs in pots on a deck was when I was in college.  I had some nice seedlings going, then we had a small tornado and everything on the deck went bye-bye  Cry
Logged
mandy1216
Journeyman
***
Last Login:February 15, 2011, 02:13:39 pm
United States United States

Religion: Wiccan
Posts: 137


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #6: May 04, 2008, 12:21:39 am »

I had herbs on a north facing balcony that was open to west sun as well.

Thanks for the info. I used to have a huge herb garden, but I lived on a farm. It was so much easier. I realy appreciate your response.
Logged

Jim Halpert:     We didn't play many video games in Scranton. Instead we'd do stuff like.. uh, Pam and I would sometimes hum the same high pitched note and try to get Dwight to make an appointment with an ear doctor. And, uh, Pam called it... Pretendinitis.
craftsmaster
Newbie
*
Last Login:July 27, 2010, 02:37:15 am
Australia Australia

Religion: Roman Catholic
Posts: 2


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7: June 08, 2010, 09:58:45 am »

I'm used to planting in the ground, and not having to deal with pots.  I live in the Chicago now, however, and only have a deck. Last year, I only planted a few herbs, stuck mostly to pansies and petunias to see how they fared in our combo of very direct/then no sunlight.

Any suggestions for keeping a vivacious potted herb garden alive?

Before you make your final decision on what herbs to grow, take a good look at the sunlight that comes through your kitchen windows.  This ultimately dictates which herbs you can grow. 

Like for instance; Basil, 20 to 24" high requires 6 to 12" spacing and direct sunlight. It grow transplants for early-season harvest.

The most basic requirement for indoor herb garden is sunlight. There are also some herb that needs partial shades like Calendula.

Logged

Carmel Santos
CEO of  *Link Removed*
The Australian Guide to Herb Gardening
makare
Newbie
*
Last Login:June 15, 2011, 09:09:12 pm
United States United States

Religion: pagan i suppose
Posts: 1


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #8: June 12, 2011, 08:48:28 pm »

 


This was very helpful to me! I am also growing some herbs in pots. Right now just chives, basil and dill. I figured they would be easier.  Thanks for the info I really want this planting to be a success. I am sick of being a "black thumb"!

(also this was my first post so I hope I did the reply thing correctly, if not let me know.)
Logged

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Care of Irish Moss?? And other indoor potted herbs.
Home and Garden SIG
Kasmira 3 7601 Last post August 20, 2007, 08:08:42 am
by Kasmira
Herb Genders
Witchcraft, Hoodoo, and Folk Magic
Aisling 2 2098 Last post July 13, 2008, 04:42:56 pm
by Thorn
Herb garden « 1 2 3 »
Magic and the Occult for Beginners
JoWV 41 11114 Last post January 27, 2010, 01:50:59 pm
by dragonfly_high
Mattie's Herb Garden 2009 « 1 2 »
Magic and the Occult for Beginners
Matrinka 21 4952 Last post April 20, 2009, 06:46:38 pm
by Owl
Herb garden planning
Home and Garden SIG
Collinsky 14 4377 Last post February 14, 2010, 05:36:24 pm
by Collinsky
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.046 seconds with 42 queries.