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Author Topic: Key differences between Greek and Roman Deities  (Read 26852 times)
RandallS
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« Reply #30: July 11, 2009, 04:54:42 pm »

Most ancient cultures believed there was one pantheon, and they all worshiped the same gods under different names...

Most ancient cultures did?  Is there any evidence for this?
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« Reply #31: July 11, 2009, 06:38:59 pm »

Most ancient cultures did?  Is there any evidence for this?

I'm thinking, and I'll need arion to confirm this, that this is what he was writing.

MOst ancient cultures worshipped one pantheon of gods, and thought that everyone else worshiped these same gods under different names.

whether or not there is any evidence of this is a different question, I just thought that the bit you snipped could be taken wrong.

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« Reply #32: July 12, 2009, 01:52:09 am »

Well, the Roman and Greek deities started out being quite different from each other, and after Rome's conquest of Greece, the Romans identified their gods with the Greek gods and attributed to them the mythology and associations of the corresponding deity. The Romans absolutely DID NOT just decide to whip up a pantheon based on the Greek one. At one time, the religions were completely separate, but over time, more and more Greek influence seeped into Roman religion.

While I agree with your general point here, it's actually a fair bit more complicated... some of the Greek influences in the area came much earlier, during the Orientalizing period, by way of the Etruscans, who were also a great influence on developing Roman religion. So the pump was primed early, so to speak.
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« Reply #33: July 12, 2009, 10:14:30 pm »

While I agree with your general point here, it's actually a fair bit more complicated... some of the Greek influences in the area came much earlier, during the Orientalizing period, by way of the Etruscans, who were also a great influence on developing Roman religion. So the pump was primed early, so to speak.

That's true.

Rome was founded around the 8th century BCE, I believe, and it consisted of a mixture of the different peoples who resided in Italy at the time. There were Greeks, Latins, and the Greek-influenced Etruscans among them. I think the concept of numina originally came from the Latins, who inhabited the region Rome was built on. Etruscans did have a strong influence on Roman religion, as well.

I guess I should have clarified that the beings the Romans worshiped were probably Latin in origin, and their perceptions of them changed through contact with the Etruscans then the Greeks. I don't know the exact chronology of the development of Roman religion, but it was influenced by many different groups.
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« Reply #34: July 13, 2009, 01:46:49 am »

I guess I should have clarified that the beings the Romans worshiped were probably Latin in origin, and their perceptions of them changed through contact with the Etruscans then the Greeks. I don't know the exact chronology of the development of Roman religion, but it was influenced by many different groups.

While many of them were Latin in origin, there were also quite a number of deities that came from the Sabines such as Soranus and Veiovis as well as various other tribes on the Italic peninsula.
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« Reply #35: July 14, 2009, 01:30:05 am »

That's always been my impression of Diana.  She is more maternal.  I get very frustrated when I am reading scholarly works that interchange the names Diana and Artemis as if they are exactly the same.  I've also had the same problem you mentioned with Italian Witchcraft.  I really like and can relate to certain elements of IW but it confuses me in that sense. 

I'm glad to know I wasn't alone in this particular difficulty... it would be interesting to ask to someone who actually practices IW the reality of the matter...all I can say about it, is that I never sensed this goddess's presence while worshipping her, which never happens when I pay my dayly devotions to Hekate, Aphrodite or any other Hellenic or Celtic goddess.

Might it simply mean that Diana Lucifera doesn't particularly like me?
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« Reply #36: July 30, 2009, 09:34:05 am »

Most ancient cultures did?  Is there any evidence for this?

I would also love to see a source of this. In terms of Rome:

When they went to Gaul and encountered the local deities most were just assumed to be different representations of the Roman deities, which could give credit to your theory. However, Rome also adopted many foreign deities into their pantheon, such as Isis and others (the name of the 'big example' deity is escaping me), which would contradict your theory.

Well, hey everyone, guess I'm back after a few month hiatus haha.
Cheers
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« Reply #37: July 30, 2009, 05:03:00 pm »

I would also love to see a source of this. In terms of Rome:

Rome is one example of an ancient culture that did, but that's a far cry from showing the claim MOST ancient cultures did is true.
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« Reply #38: July 30, 2009, 07:49:01 pm »

...such as Isis and others (the name of the 'big example' deity is escaping me), which would contradict your theory.

You are probably thinking of Kybele.
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« Reply #39: July 30, 2009, 08:00:52 pm »

You are probably thinking of Kybele.
IIRC, that's more a "big example" of the Greeks being syncretically adoptive, than of the Romans.  Who comes to my mind as a non-Roman deity that had a significant Roman following (at least for a while) is Mithras - I wouldn't be surprised if that was who Kitsune was trying to remember.

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« Reply #40: July 30, 2009, 11:18:20 pm »

IIRC, that's more a "big example" of the Greeks being syncretically adoptive, than of the Romans.  Who comes to my mind as a non-Roman deity that had a significant Roman following (at least for a while) is Mithras - I wouldn't be surprised if that was who Kitsune was trying to remember.

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« Reply #41: July 31, 2009, 12:53:36 am »

What are the key differences between individual Greek and Roman Gods?

For example, what are the main differences between Hera and Juno, Artemis and Diana, Poseidon and Neptune, etc?

Are there some deities who may be one in the same or are the differences so great that it is unlikely?

I don't see it so much as the deities being different or the same... it's more like the cults and cultural forms of worship surrounding the Gods in Greece and Rome were different. A good example would probably be the difference between the maenads of Dionysus in Greece and the Bacchanalia of Rome. The Bacchanalia was probably full of licentious behavior, but most likely did not feature women chasing some guy down, ripping him to shreds & eating him.
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« Reply #42: July 31, 2009, 03:23:35 am »

IIRC, that's more a "big example" of the Greeks being syncretically adoptive, than of the Romans.  Who comes to my mind as a non-Roman deity that had a significant Roman following (at least for a while) is Mithras - I wouldn't be surprised if that was who Kitsune was trying to remember.

Sunflower

Honestly I thought they both did. I know Kybele became the Magna Mater in Rome, and apparently had a giant rock there that was sacred to her (?), and even had state festivals.

But I admit Mithras slipped my mind. ^_^;
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« Reply #43: August 16, 2009, 02:22:24 am »



One thing that just occurred me is that I never considered Greek Hekate as a different entity than Roman Hecate -although I remember this goddess at first came from Asia Minor-, even if in myworship I refer to her mainly as the Greek maiden. Perhaps it's the fact that beteween  Greek Hekate and Roman Hecate, for what I know, there were very few differences until that late roman era when She went from maiden to crone.
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« Reply #44: August 16, 2009, 08:15:21 am »

Perhaps it's the fact that beteween  Greek Hekate and Roman Hecate, for what I know, there were very few differences until that late roman era when She went from maiden to crone.

I believe you are correct. Of course, that move from maiden to crone is something that causes lots of trouble for Hellenic Pagans tired of Wicca 101 books who project the late Roman version of Hecate back onto the Greek Hekate.  Sad
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