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Author Topic: teaching at Pagan High  (Read 29965 times)
Perzephone
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« Reply #150: July 22, 2009, 12:23:20 am »

If I were designing a curriculum for a school--any school, not just a pagan school--I'd make sure that experimentation, exploration, and the scientific method were well-incorporated into science classes at an early level, but that in high school and, possibly even earlier, classes included math. The reason for this is--well, it actually provides a reason for learning math. Algebra, geometry, trig and calculus and even more basic math are a lot more useful when used within science than outside of it.

I think that advanced classes, be they maths, sciences, English/composition whatever, should be elective and not a requirement for graduation - or maybe have an 'Advanced Placement' program for kids who strive for the Honor Roll.

I'd hate to be a kid whose parent enrolled me in a school only to find out that I had to pass four semesters of advanced math in order to graduate. Algebra was a big part of why I dropped out of high school. I can handle business math, I can handle geometry with its concrete objects... but algebra? I failed three years worth of high school algebra (along with summer school & endless hours of tutoring) & gave up the fourth year. (Of course, to this day, the only time I've encountered algebra has been on a college placement exam - I had to take 4 remedial math classes to get to a math class that gave me credit towards my degree - thank the Gods for business math).
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« Reply #151: July 22, 2009, 12:36:57 am »

I think that advanced classes, be they maths, sciences, English/composition whatever, should be elective and not a requirement for graduation - or maybe have an 'Advanced Placement' program for kids who strive for the Honor Roll.

I'd hate to be a kid whose parent enrolled me in a school only to find out that I had to pass four semesters of advanced math in order to graduate. Algebra was a big part of why I dropped out of high school. I can handle business math, I can handle geometry with its concrete objects... but algebra? I failed three years worth of high school algebra (along with summer school & endless hours of tutoring) & gave up the fourth year. (Of course, to this day, the only time I've encountered algebra has been on a college placement exam - I had to take 4 remedial math classes to get to a math class that gave me credit towards my degree - thank the Gods for business math).

I tend to agree, but I never heard of Algebra being called a 'higher math.'  When I hear that phrase, I always think of Trigonometry or Calculus.
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« Reply #152: July 22, 2009, 05:13:46 am »

I tend to agree, but I never heard of Algebra being called a 'higher math.'  When I hear that phrase, I always think of Trigonometry or Calculus.

At my high school, we had two years of Algebra (you did AlgI, then Geometry, then AlgII, then Trig, then Calc--the kids who took calculus either took AlgI and Geometry the same year, or did AlgI in eighth grade).  I suppose the second year might be considered "higher" enough to be optional in a school where "higher" math was elective.

(Of course, the other thing was, at my school the requirement was three years of math, but it didn't really matter what kind.  I think there were three courses below the Algebra level if you didn't want to take it--though one of them may have been Pre-Algebra.)
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« Reply #153: July 22, 2009, 05:20:59 am »



A couple of questions that occur to me are: Does anyone know any good text books or other course material that they feel should/could be used? At what age would it be used? For what subject(s) or topic(s)?
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« Reply #154: July 23, 2009, 03:40:38 pm »

A couple of questions that occur to me are: Does anyone know any good text books or other course material that they feel should/could be used? At what age would it be used? For what subject(s) or topic(s)?

Campbell and Reece Biology, 6th edition. *best textbook EVER* In fact, I liked it so much, I bought the 7th edition so I could finish reading it because I had 1 chapter left. Unfortunately, they totally revamped the formatting for the 7th edition so it looks awful. I wrote a review about it on Amazon. *biology nerd*
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« Reply #155: July 24, 2009, 12:57:33 am »

In first grade my daughter got "does not share well with others".  According to her, that meant she didn't let other kids use the crayons I was forced to supply for her - she said they put them in their mouths and that was gross.  How could I disagree?

All I can say there is "Ewwww."  I wouldn't have shared either. Grin
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« Reply #156: July 24, 2009, 12:59:14 am »

Cheesy

I almost fell over when my mum and I went to parent's evening only to find out that my P.E. teacher was also her P.E. teacher from when she was at school! Which is odd, seeing as how I didn't go to the same school as my mum.

Although it kind of turned out to be a good thing, as it didn't matter how bad I was in P.E. I was seemingly much better than my mum was. My P.E. teacher gave me a much easier time from then on.

My science teacher in junior high had my older half sister (like 15 years before me) and both my younger sisters (youngest is 8 years below me).  And he was ... rather strange.
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« Reply #157: July 24, 2009, 01:00:44 am »

Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Your future as a Cauldronite was obvious even then.

It peeves me no end when teachers say that as if it was a bad thing.  What, you'd rather your students were weak-minded??  Gah.

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« Reply #158: July 24, 2009, 11:20:45 am »

All I can say there is "Ewwww."  I wouldn't have shared either. Grin

The elementary school my children went to (I guess this is standard now, but wasn't back in the dark ages when I was in school) required a long list of school supplies.  It was a financial strain for me to supply them at that time, but I did it.  Then many of the teachers expected the kids to make their supplies available to all the other kids too - because some parents didn't (probably couldn't) get them.  My daughter (my oldest - so her brother followed suit) felt they were bought for her and I backed her up - to the teacher's face.  With one teacher I made it clear that since I was on food stamps I didn't feel I should be subsidizing anyone elses child at that time.  I felt sorry for those kids, but I had to save up just to get what I did - resupplying wasn't an option and my kids knew it. 
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« Reply #159: July 24, 2009, 11:50:28 am »

A couple of questions that occur to me are: Does anyone know any good text books or other course material that they feel should/could be used? At what age would it be used? For what subject(s) or topic(s)?

I had to take American History for my Associates and the text book required by the professor was Give Me Liberty by Eric Foner. I have to say, honestly, that the book was a good read on its own and for the first time in my life, it made American history enjoyable. A big part of it was that it didn't focus on what General did what at which battle - it spoke more about trends and cycles, and how America grew up in a global environment. I learned so much from it that wasn't even mentioned during high school, and unlike my high school 'who did what at which battle' history classes, I've retained a good deal of what I learned.

It wasn't a hard read, either - I don't see why any average high school student wouldn't be able to understand anything said in the book - but it didn't do much for that 'America is always the good guy' image that grade school & high school American history tries to perpetuate. Unfortunately it doesn't look like the guy wrote any World History.

It just occurred to me - where exactly is 'Pagan High'? Is it in the U.S.? England? Canada? Japan? Should it even have a 'local' history class?
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« Reply #160: July 24, 2009, 12:06:13 pm »

It just occurred to me - where exactly is 'Pagan High'? Is it in the U.S.? England? Canada? Japan? Should it even have a 'local' history class?

"Local" meaning "the country it's located in"?  I'm a little unclear on why it would not include such a thing.  It seems to me that knowing the country you're living in would be pretty important.  (Particularly if there are history classes that cover other areas of the world--why would you study other people's history but not your own?)  And yeah, at least here in the US kids get some of that in earlier grades than high school, but high school offers an opportunity to take a closer and more mature look at important events in our history than they would've gotten previously.

(That said, as you point out, there are obviously different concepts of what "knowing your history" entails.  I'd suggest a combination of the two, because while I think knowing the trends and cycles is probably more important in a general sense, I also think that having some idea--however hazy--of the significance of the Battle of Gettysburg for instance is probably also a good idea just for cultural-literacy purposes.)
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« Reply #161: July 24, 2009, 05:34:24 pm »

It just occurred to me - where exactly is 'Pagan High'? Is it in the U.S.? England? Canada? Japan? Should it even have a 'local' history class?

I don't know if this will make any sense but I'll give it a try.  Knowing the "local" History would seem to me to help in magical workings, knowing what has shaped the energies in the area.  Also, what shaped the people in various areas, why things are the way they are so that it is easier to understand who and/or what you might be dealing with.

Learning customs and lore for a general area isn't a bad thing either. Why they changed, when that happened, peacefully or at war, who was predominate at what time in the area.

It seems to me that knowing the country you're living in would be pretty important.  (Particularly if there are history classes that cover other areas of the world--why would you study other people's history but not your own?) 

(That said, as you point out, there are obviously different concepts of what "knowing your history" entails.  I'd suggest a combination of the two, because while I think knowing the trends and cycles is probably more important in a general sense, I also think that having some idea--however hazy--of the significance of the Battle of Gettysburg for instance is probably also a good idea just for cultural-literacy purposes.)

(Using the quote from Star to give credit for her idea and further my point.)

That too. Knowing trends and cycles can be important in seeing where you are now, where you might be headed, that sort of thing.  (General "you" there.) 

Hope I made some sense. Embarrassed
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« Reply #162: July 24, 2009, 06:11:40 pm »

"Local" meaning "the country it's located in"?  I'm a little unclear on why it would not include such a thing.  It seems to me that knowing the country you're living in would be pretty important.  (Particularly if there are history classes that cover other areas of the world--why would you study other people's history but not your own?)  And yeah, at least here in the US kids get some of that in earlier grades than high school, but high school offers an opportunity to take a closer and more mature look at important events in our history than they would've gotten previously.

If it helps, requirements for the school I teach at (and actually also at the boarding school I graduated from myself, which had a substantial international student population, but was in the US) were:

- One year of world history (a little bit of classical history, but a lot more from about 1200CE on.)
- One year of United States history
- One semester of some kind of social science (economics, psychology, sociology, geography, etc.)
- One semester of history or social studies focused on other parts of the world (China and Japan, Model United Nations, etc.)

Since, in practice, colleges generally want 4 years of history or social studies, students generally another two semesters, but they're much more a free choice. (So someone could do economics, sociology, and psychology, and then human geography, and fulfill all their requirements, or could take a year of European History instead of two of those social sciences, or any number of other combinations.)
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« Reply #163: August 27, 2009, 06:36:42 pm »



Pardon me if this has been said -

But I would really love to teach English/Literature/Writing.

First and foremost, it's what I'm good at. Secondly, I would incorporate mythology and classical literature INTO the curriculum (as if the kids wouldn't be bored to tears by it already at this point  Roll Eyes ). But I would also require some sort of ongoing journal ( x entries per week of x "lines" - like, 3 entries a week, 15 lines minimum). There would be suggested, but not required, topics and the entire thing would be graded based on completion rather than on quality.

I think I'd also ask for a few writing assignments (also completion grades) for ideas for incantations/mantras/spells/etc of their own to work into their own lives.   =)


ALSO: I believe there should be a graduation-eligible path within the school that can be basically secular. Some Pagan (and other openminded) parents might not like religious things being taught to their children by strangers.

I second (or third, fourth, whatever) the notion of home-ec. My boyfriend can't even make ramen!
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« Reply #164: August 27, 2009, 06:49:46 pm »


It should be pointed out that, in a country where childhood obesity is soaring and where we're raising a nation of Gameboy-playing couch potatoes who never leave their parents' basements, having kids play sports is not a bad thing. And for a lot of kids, sports is the gateway to a lot of good things (a few lessons in discipline, teamwork, and sportsmanship; a sense of self-worth; a college scholarship...). Not to mention it gives lots of kids something into which they can channel all that restless teen energy.


While a music-obsessive and self-professed choir geek, I have to agree with this statement. I think that any food served/vended in a school should not only be healthy, but should be setting a healthy example. I also thing that physical education should literally BE physical education and that sports should be separate from Gym/PE class. It should be some kind of hybrid health class/working out on gym equipment class.

I know in HS I would have been MUCH LESS apt to sit out gym if it wasn't REQUIRED for me to do things that humiliated me or that I hated (Like play basketball). If, however, the class taught the fundamentals of a healthy lifestyle (exercise at least ___ times a week for ___ minutes) and then provided the opportunity IN SCHOOL to fulfill those requirements, I'd have done it. Like, you get credit for the day for working out using a treadmill/elliptical, weight machines, etc. There should also be an option to fulfill cardio requirements by going outside for the class period to play the aforementioned games with an adequate supervisor (teacher or aide.)

I also think that it should be, in a sense, made light of. I don't know if that makes sense. Like, if using the gym at school was "no big deal" and "everyone did it" - than less people would be made fun of for doing so. Know what I mean?

Anywho, that's my two cents.
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