The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
November 21, 2019, 10:15:43 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 21, 2019, 10:15:43 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: Sacred Journeys and Pagan Pilgrimages  (Read 6591 times)
Aisling
High Adept Member
******
*
Last Login:November 11, 2012, 02:17:34 pm
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
TCN ID: Aisling
Posts: 4056


Blog entries (4)

harvestmoon13


Ignore
« Topic Start: July 12, 2009, 03:57:20 pm »

Altair's wonderful TCN blog about his pilgrimage to Iceland has me wondering about the place of sacred jouneys and pilgrimages on our individual paths.

Are pilgrimages a part of your path? If so, what places call to you- religious places, historically significant places, natural wonders, etc.?

To expand a bit on the topic, what purpose do such pilgrimages serve in a spiritual/religious context? What do you do upon arrival at your destination? Or is the journey itself the important thing?  If you've made such a journey, has it changed your perspective or practice in any way?  Are there drawbacks or problems associated with making sacred journeys? 
Logged

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

brandonb70
Master Member
****
*
Last Login:May 26, 2011, 12:18:40 pm
United States United States

Religion: Ásatrú/Heathen
TCN ID: Brandon
Posts: 287


Honor above all else

Blog entries (0)

brandon_bourg brandon.bourg brandonb70


Ignore
« Reply #1: July 14, 2009, 11:08:42 am »

A pilgrimage I don't think would be nessasary but it would be nice to see "where it all happened". I think that a spiritual pilgrimage would be great for everyone of any religion because it would help you connect with the history of your path. I would love to see Iceland and Northern Europe. I think seeing the symbols, writings, and teachings of you faith carved literally in stone 2k years ago goes from being something you read about to something you know. I don't know if that makes sense but to me it would be confirming (Not that I don't believe right now) it just would make it that much better. And of course you would get to meet people who live with it everyday and talk with them more in depth about various topics.
Logged

I know that I hung on a windy tree
nine long nights,
wounded with a spear, dedicated to Odin,
myself to myself,
on that tree of which no man knows
from where its roots run. - Hávamál
Aster Breo
SIG Coordinator
Staff
Grand Adept Member
***
Last Login:January 29, 2013, 09:32:22 pm
United States United States

Religion: Feral Brighideach
TCN ID: Aster Breo
Posts: 5260


Avatar byJuni & Dania

Blog entries (0)


« Reply #2: July 14, 2009, 04:55:52 pm »

Are pilgrimages a part of your path? If so, what places call to you- religious places, historically significant places, natural wonders, etc.?

To expand a bit on the topic, what purpose do such pilgrimages serve in a spiritual/religious context? What do you do upon arrival at your destination? Or is the journey itself the important thing?  If you've made such a journey, has it changed your perspective or practice in any way?  Are there drawbacks or problems associated with making sacred journeys?

I haven't made the big pilgrimage that I hope to be able to someday -- to Kildare and to Newgrange.  I'd LOVE to experience Newgrange at the winter solstice (when the sun shines down the tumulus and illuminates the back wall).  And I'd LOVE to spend Imbolc in Kildare. 

The organization Solas Bhride (http://www.solasbhride.ie/) sponsors events at Imbolc specifically for people taking pilgrimages there.  They also have an online "virtual pilgrimage" photo tour, as well as a booklet (which I have).  But I'm sure there's nothing like being there.

I think, for me, being in Kildare would help to make my spirituality more tangible.  That's the same reason I like symbols and amulets and such.  They're touchable, and therefore help me to feel confident in the reality of what's going on in my head.  I also think being there with people who also feel something similar to what I'm feeling -- whether they're there for the saint or the goddess -- would be a very validating experience.

I know know whether I would feel closer to Brighid if I was physically in Kildare.  I kinda hope not.  I do understand that She was very likely a sovereignty goddess for at least some groups of ancient Celts (or that was one of Her functions, anyway), but my personal experience of Her has obviously not been connected to geography.

Oddly, I had a taste of the pilgrimage experience a few years ago, when I went to Alaska for a work trip.  Somehow, I connected in some way with Raven, who seemed to be sort of watching out for me while I was there in His territory.  It was completely unintentional on my part, and it was just plain weird.  But it was also obvious that He was kind of...babysitting   Tongue  ... as a favor to Brighid.  I have no clue why.  Like I said, it was weird.  And I've never heard from Him again.
Logged

"The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place."  ~ George Bernard Shaw
Aisling
High Adept Member
******
*
Last Login:November 11, 2012, 02:17:34 pm
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
TCN ID: Aisling
Posts: 4056


Blog entries (4)

harvestmoon13


Ignore
« Reply #3: July 14, 2009, 06:49:35 pm »

I'd LOVE to experience Newgrange at the winter solstice (when the sun shines down the tumulus and illuminates the back wall). 

You and me both! I'm kicking myself for not making it to the Brú na Bóinne complex when I was in Ireland a few years ago.  Next time. Definitely next time.
Logged

Aisling
High Adept Member
******
*
Last Login:November 11, 2012, 02:17:34 pm
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
TCN ID: Aisling
Posts: 4056


Blog entries (4)

harvestmoon13


Ignore
« Reply #4: July 14, 2009, 08:13:51 pm »


I realized that I didn't address my own questions, so here goes...

Even though I haven't made a journey specifically for the purpose of a pilgrimage, I find that most of my travels have included a sacred or spiritual element whether by accident or design.  My best Christmas Eve ever was spent perched on the edge of the Grand Canyon watching the snow fall.  I can't find words to describe the feelings it created, only that I knew at that moment I was on the right path and that there was a sense of connectedness to all that is, was or will be. Even years later, the memory of it leaves me in awe. 

I'm hoping for more of those kinds of moments during a trip I'm planning for next year to Britain. There's a bit of a pilgrimage element to it, as well as some family history, a bit of mythology, and some outright tourism.  With stops in the SW of England (Stonehenge, Avebury, Glastonbury), northern Wales (Snowdonia & Lake Bala), and the islands off Scotland (Skye, Lewis, Orkney, and if I can squeeze another day of vacation out of my employer, Iona), there should be plenty of opportunity for awe-inspiring moments along the way.  I'm not sure exactly what spiritual purpose seeing these places will serve, other than a satisfaction of my unending curiosity, but I'll let everyone know in Autumn of next year.  Smiley
Logged

Aster Breo
SIG Coordinator
Staff
Grand Adept Member
***
Last Login:January 29, 2013, 09:32:22 pm
United States United States

Religion: Feral Brighideach
TCN ID: Aster Breo
Posts: 5260


Avatar byJuni & Dania

Blog entries (0)


« Reply #5: July 14, 2009, 11:43:48 pm »

You and me both! I'm kicking myself for not making it to the Brú na Bóinne complex when I was in Ireland a few years ago.  Next time. Definitely next time.

I'm sure there are many of us on TC who would like to make that trip!

Maybe we should look for a group tour.   Wink
Logged

"The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place."  ~ George Bernard Shaw
Aster Breo
SIG Coordinator
Staff
Grand Adept Member
***
Last Login:January 29, 2013, 09:32:22 pm
United States United States

Religion: Feral Brighideach
TCN ID: Aster Breo
Posts: 5260


Avatar byJuni & Dania

Blog entries (0)


« Reply #6: July 14, 2009, 11:44:27 pm »

a trip I'm planning for next year to Britain

You WILL post pictures, won't you?  I want to live vicariously through your vacation.
Logged

"The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place."  ~ George Bernard Shaw
Aisling
High Adept Member
******
*
Last Login:November 11, 2012, 02:17:34 pm
United States United States

Religion: Eclectic Pagan
TCN ID: Aisling
Posts: 4056


Blog entries (4)

harvestmoon13


Ignore
« Reply #7: July 15, 2009, 08:06:59 am »

You WILL post pictures, won't you?  I want to live vicariously through your vacation.

Not only will there be pictures, I'm certain there will be lots of babbling about it as well.   Cheesy
Logged

Finn
High Adept Member
******
*
Last Login:December 22, 2013, 02:30:14 pm
United States United States

Religion: An Seanchas Fior
TCN ID: Finn
Posts: 2754


The world is quiet here.

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8: July 15, 2009, 03:33:00 pm »

Not only will there be pictures, I'm certain there will be lots of babbling about it as well.   Cheesy

Babble away. I'm counting on you for inspiration for my own UK sojourn.  Wink
Logged

Fight evil: read books.

My Spiritual Blog: An Seanchas Fior
My Personal Blog: An Seanchas Finn
Altair
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:December 18, 2012, 06:59:40 am
United States United States

Religion: Wiccan-ish pantheistic polytheist
Posts: 1942


Follow your star wherever it may lead

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #9: July 15, 2009, 11:11:39 pm »

What do you do upon arrival at your destination? Or is the journey itself the important thing?  If you've made such a journey, has it changed your perspective or practice in any way?  Are there drawbacks or problems associated with making sacred journeys? 


A couple of thoughts:

I've found there are two competing aspects to a pilgrimage. On the one hand, it's only worth what you bring to it; Stonehenge, for example, is just a pile of rocks, unless you have in mind something of its significance. On the other hand, it's important to let the site be what it is without layering too many preconceived notions on it; to experience it and let it work its special "magic" on you in its own way. (In fact, one may find that a site doesn't work for you, or that it's effects are not at all what was expected, and one has to be prepared for that.) It's an interesting dichotomy.

As far as how pilgrimage has changed my spiritual practice, it's definitely giving me a new perspective. I don't often call the quarters--I'm usually not that ritualized. When I have, it's always been on a personal (the fire in me, my emotions as the ebb and flow of water, etc.) and local level (the earth, air, fire, and water of the particular place I'm in). Now I can also summon memories of Uluru for the South--of the epitome of the sun's fire, of a flame-scorched environment, of a desert-worn red monolith--and of Iguazu for the West, etc., and suddenly I'm calling the quarters globally, bringing the whole planet into the picture.

The wildly exotic names almost become a mantra or a prayer: "From Uluru to Iguazu, from Ngorongoro to Qomolangma..." (I'm working up to Qomolangma [Mt. Everest]; that's next, I fervently hope!) Each name conjuring powerful images, experiences, and associations. It resonates for me.
Logged

KitsuneinDreams
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:June 10, 2010, 08:30:19 am
United States United States

Religion: Devotee of Minerva
Posts: 74


Nunc ades o coeptis, flava Minerva, meiss

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10: August 06, 2009, 02:10:25 pm »

Altair's wonderful TCN blog about his pilgrimage to Iceland has me wondering about the place of sacred jouneys and pilgrimages on our individual paths.

Are pilgrimages a part of your path? If so, what places call to you- religious places, historically significant places, natural wonders, etc.?

To expand a bit on the topic, what purpose do such pilgrimages serve in a spiritual/religious context? What do you do upon arrival at your destination? Or is the journey itself the important thing?  If you've made such a journey, has it changed your perspective or practice in any way?  Are there drawbacks or problems associated with making sacred journeys? 


I feel bad bumping an old thread, but I would like to voice my opinion on this.

I feel pilgrimages are certainly a way to be pious. But it also depends on your faith. For strictly a nature worship perspective, simply going outdoors can be a form of pilgrimage, and certainly not a faith where being pious. On the other-hand, for a recon focus, such as Hellenic or Religio Romana, being pious is very important. However, for those of pagan faiths I don't believe there is any real protocol for going to a sacred site, it is more about feeling, knowing, and understanding.

Four years ago I went to Stonehenge, it was not planned as my family was in England for other matters, it just sort of came about. Being an archaeologist, and a pagan, I wasn't expecting much except for a notion "oh hey, that's cool!" Then walk around the place and take in the sight. But, because I knew of the power of the place, and wasn't focused on the archaeological nature of it alone, I was really able to feel.  To feel the energy of the place, not just the history of it, but the importance of it... It was certainly a turning point in my spiritual belief.

I often think it would be amazing to go to Rome, to visit the temples, even to the Greek Parthenon for a mere relationship to Minerva. In Rome I could visit the Capotoline Hill Museum, the Colloseum, the Forum Romanum, Imperial Forums, and more importantly, the Pantheon (although now changed into a church [cries over the change] it was still the temple to the Roman Gods. Would I have the same sense of feeling upon visiting these places? I know it would certainly make Minerva happy, but I don't think it is absolutely necessary for me to go, and the reason is this, which I reiterate: In my opinion, pilgrimages in the pagan faith is about feeling, about a connection to the divine. However, we are able to achieve this through ritual, through mediation, through thoughts and actions on a daily basis, so pilgrimages are only the extreme form of feeling, something to be undertaken simply for the joy of it, not for some form of religious dedication or observance.

Plus I don't have the money to go to Rome  Wink

Cheers
Logged


Altair
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:December 18, 2012, 06:59:40 am
United States United States

Religion: Wiccan-ish pantheistic polytheist
Posts: 1942


Follow your star wherever it may lead

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #11: August 06, 2009, 02:45:56 pm »

pilgrimages in the pagan faith is about feeling, about a connection to the divine. However, we are able to achieve this through ritual, through mediation, through thoughts and actions on a daily basis, so pilgrimages are only the extreme form of feeling, something to be undertaken simply for the joy of it, not for some form of religious dedication or observance[/i].

I agree that pilgrimages aren't *necessary* (though--someone correct me if I'm wrong--I think in Islam, it actually *is* necessary that one make the pilgrimage to Mecca at some point in life). However, I'm interested in exploring their value; what does that extreme form of feeling, as you put it, have to offer?

My only quibble is when you talk about "pilgrimages in the pagan faith," since there is no one pagan faith; just a whole lot of extremely different belief systems.
Logged

KitsuneinDreams
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:June 10, 2010, 08:30:19 am
United States United States

Religion: Devotee of Minerva
Posts: 74


Nunc ades o coeptis, flava Minerva, meiss

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12: August 06, 2009, 05:39:58 pm »

I agree that pilgrimages aren't *necessary* (though--someone correct me if I'm wrong--I think in Islam, it actually *is* necessary that one make the pilgrimage to Mecca at some point in life). However, I'm interested in exploring their value; what does that extreme form of feeling, as you put it, have to offer?

My only quibble is when you talk about "pilgrimages in the pagan faith," since there is no one pagan faith; just a whole lot of extremely different belief systems.

Yes, I was trying to lump them all together, to be a bit more holistic. Ultimately many different pagan faiths come down to the same principles, same thoughts, just different means of attaining it and viewing it through different mediums.

And yes, you are right, in Islam it is necessary, it is commanded, because they have to be pious AND penitent before God "who is almighty".

That extreme form of feeling offers a connection to divine, it offers spiritual wisdom and thought, a form of connection that forms a deep seeded relationship with the God(s) and Goddess(es). In my opinion, anyway.
Logged


Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


Related Topics
Subject Started by Replies Views Last post
Pilgrimages « 1 2 »
Paganism For Beginners
Innse_Iboth 24 6729 Last post April 21, 2007, 10:03:38 pm
by RandallS
the lack of sacred texts in Pagan religions « 1 2 3 4 »
Pagan Religions
Juniper 53 13820 Last post September 18, 2008, 10:13:14 pm
by Didgeridoo
Pagan Pilgrimages « 1 2 »
Pagan Spirituality
Altair 15 4637 Last post November 03, 2009, 11:42:23 am
by samham73
CDs with guided meditations/journeys etc.
Books and Other Resources
Waldfrau 10 3988 Last post March 21, 2010, 07:37:31 pm
by AnneNevill
Odhroerir: Nine Devotional Tales of Odin's Journeys
Pagan Religion Book Discussions
RandallS 0 1844 Last post February 16, 2010, 05:53:06 pm
by RandallS
EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.053 seconds with 53 queries.