The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum (Archive Board)
June 21, 2021, 02:47:24 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This is our Read Only Archive Board (closed to posting July 2011). Join our new vBulletin board!
 
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
June 21, 2021, 02:47:24 am

Login with username, password and session length
Donate!
The Cauldron's server is expensive and requires monthly payments. Please become a Bronze, Silver or Gold Donor if you can. Donations are needed every month. Without member support, we can't afford the server.
TC Staff
Important Information about this Archive Board
This message board is The Cauldron: A Pagan Forum's SMF Archive Board. It is closed to new memberships and to posting, but there are over 250,000 messages here that you can still search and read -- many full of interesting and useful information. (This board was open from February 2007 through June 2011).

Our new vBulletin discussion board is located at http://www.ecauldron.com/forum/ -- if you would like to participate in discussions like those you see here, please visit our new vBulletin message board, register an account and join in our discussions. We hope you will find the information in this message archive useful and will consider joining us on our new board.
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
Author Topic: Aphrodite: God Is A Woman  (Read 7563 times)
Kullervo
Apprentice
**
Last Login:August 05, 2009, 10:28:33 am
United States United States

Religion: Hellenic Polytheist
Posts: 23


Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Topic Start: August 03, 2009, 10:03:46 am »

I feel a much closer connection to the divine feminine than I ever did to the divine masculine, my patriarchal Mormon upbringing notwithstanding. I guess either it just didn’t take, or it just wasn’t true. Or both, probably. I feel an intimacy and closeness with the overwhelmingly feminine divinity of Aphrodite that I have never felt with a masculine god. Not even Dionysus, whose reality I do not doubt, and who has made his presence known in my life unambiguously, has so powerful a hld on my spirit. But Aphrodite, whose divinity in many ways merges into a general, all-encompassing feminine divine presence that is firmly rooted in the human universe, has a power over me that in it’s own way is more intoxicating than Dionysus’s ever has been. Aphrodite is soft and visceral, erotic and frightening, gentle and savage, warm and comforting: she is truly both the beginning and the end, both the womb and the grave.

When I touch my wife, I touch this river of female divinity in a way that is at once overwhelmingly universal and beautifully particular. She is not somehow channeling Aphrodite, because in a very real way she IS Aphrodite, although she is at the same time thoroughly, passionately, and intensely herself.

Although I think for practical purposes, the gods and goddesses are individuals that can be approached and entreated individually, I also think you do not have to go very far into their divinity before their individuality gives way to universal principles and an ultimate divine unity. The gods and goddesses are closer to the ultimate unity of all things than we mortals are, and that is precisely what gives them so much power and makes them at once so intoxicating and terrifying.

And that is the powerful divine experience that I feel: beyond and within my beautiful wife is a beautiful goddess; beyond and within that beautiful goddess is a beautiful universal divine female principle that flows through birth, sex, and death; and beyond and within that beautiful divine feminine is the intensely beautiful and ultimate unity of all things, the divine center.

I am glad to be a pagan, because it means I am free to experience the incredible intensity and ecstasy of this powerful divine feminine fully, unreservedly, and without excuse, shame, or qualification. I am proud and unashamed of my spirituality, because I know that I am living a life that is authentic and full. To me, this kind of reckless and dangerous spirituality is an essintial part of what it means to really be alive.
Logged

Welcome, Guest!
You will need to register and/or login to participate in our discussions.

Read our Rules and Policies and the Quoting Guidelines.

Help Fund Our Server? Donate to Lyricfox's Cancer Fund?

Carnelian
Master Member
****
Last Login:January 15, 2012, 12:55:04 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: Greek paganism
Posts: 289


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #1: August 09, 2009, 07:52:43 pm »

I am glad to be a pagan, because it means I am free to experience the incredible intensity and ecstasy of this powerful divine feminine fully, unreservedly, and without excuse, shame, or qualification. I am proud and unashamed of my spirituality, because I know that I am living a life that is authentic and full. To me, this kind of reckless and dangerous spirituality is an essintial part of what it means to really be alive.

Thanks for sharing, Kullervo Smiley
Logged
KitsuneinDreams
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:June 10, 2010, 08:30:19 am
United States United States

Religion: Devotee of Minerva
Posts: 74


Nunc ades o coeptis, flava Minerva, meiss

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2: August 10, 2009, 03:44:41 am »



The Myth of the Goddess: Evolution of an Image.
http://www.amazon.com/Myth-Goddess-Evolution-Image-Arkana/dp/0140192921/ref=sr_1_32?ie=UTF8&qid=1249889969&sr=8-32

You may be interested in this book for some interesting, albeit not light, reading. I had it assigned for one of my literature courses concerning the feminine divine, which was incredibly interesting from my male perspective.

At times it can seem overloaded with feminist thought, but never-the-less, it is enjoyable.

Cheers
Logged


Caroline
Master Member
****
Last Login:October 07, 2011, 11:24:24 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: polytheist
Posts: 478

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #3: August 10, 2009, 09:12:12 pm »


At times it can seem overloaded with feminist thought, but never-the-less, it is enjoyable.

Overloaded with feminist thought? Oh noes!
Logged
Carnelian
Master Member
****
Last Login:January 15, 2012, 12:55:04 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: Greek paganism
Posts: 289


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #4: August 10, 2009, 11:50:00 pm »

And that is the powerful divine experience that I feel: beyond and within my beautiful wife is a beautiful goddess; beyond and within that beautiful goddess is a beautiful universal divine female principle that flows through birth, sex, and death; and beyond and within that beautiful divine feminine is the intensely beautiful and ultimate unity of all things, the divine center.

Reading this again, it reminded me of the concept of Shakti in Tantric Hinduism. It might be worth looking into, if you haven't already: http://www.pantheon.org/articles/s/shakti.html
Logged
KitsuneinDreams
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:June 10, 2010, 08:30:19 am
United States United States

Religion: Devotee of Minerva
Posts: 74


Nunc ades o coeptis, flava Minerva, meiss

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5: August 11, 2009, 12:17:36 pm »

Overloaded with feminist thought? Oh noes!

Oh don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining or anything, I was just meaning that the authors are a bit biased on some of their interpretations (in regards to what I learned in my other anthropology/archaeology classes)

Cheers
Logged


Caroline
Master Member
****
Last Login:October 07, 2011, 11:24:24 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: polytheist
Posts: 478

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #6: August 11, 2009, 12:40:49 pm »

Oh don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining or anything, I was just meaning that the authors are a bit biased on some of their interpretations (in regards to what I learned in my other anthropology/archaeology classes)

Cheers

Then say that their interpretations are biased or faulty in certain areas (and better still, define those areas, give examples and counter arguments) rather than sum it all up as "overloaded with feminist thought". When you do that, you casually, and rather universally, equate feminism with poor scholarship.

If you'd like to discuss certain areas of this book I'm sure there are people here (myself among them) who would be delighted with the topic.

Caroline

Logged
yewberry
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2014, 04:15:33 pm
United States United States

Posts: 2087

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #7: August 11, 2009, 12:49:06 pm »

You may be interested in this book for some interesting, albeit not light, reading. I had it assigned for one of my literature courses concerning the feminine divine, which was incredibly interesting from my male perspective.

Ugh.  Sorry...just...ugh.  I hate bad history, even in a "literature" class.

Will someone please explain to me why we need specious history to make being strong, independent women a good thing? 

Just one more "ugh" for the road...

Brina
Logged
KitsuneinDreams
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:June 10, 2010, 08:30:19 am
United States United States

Religion: Devotee of Minerva
Posts: 74


Nunc ades o coeptis, flava Minerva, meiss

Blog entries (0)

WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8: August 12, 2009, 12:56:54 pm »

Then say that their interpretations are biased or faulty in certain areas (and better still, define those areas, give examples and counter arguments) rather than sum it all up as "overloaded with feminist thought". When you do that, you casually, and rather universally, equate feminism with poor scholarship.

If you'd like to discuss certain areas of this book I'm sure there are people here (myself among them) who would be delighted with the topic.

Caroline



How does feminist thought imply bad scholarship? In no way does it. I sort of feel like I was just put under oath... I mentioned twice that it was very interesting and enjoyable, so how is it really negative. My only complaint was that when addressing a subject, often times they would focus on only one part of the storyt rather than the whole, making it biased; however, by no means does that mean it is not well researched. I don't have the book with me, I bought it for one of my classes three years ago, then sold it back to the bookstore (I was a broke college student). I am merely stating what I remember, one of which is that it was the majority of the class' opinion (18 girls, 3 guys) that the book was biased from a feminist perspective, and as a result felt preachy at times.  Even my professor, who WAS a feminist stated as such, but that is one reason she picked the book, because it was a bold book, giving a new spin to historical archaeology and mythology.

I did not mean to upset anyone, after all, how was I to know that stating I enjoyed a book from feminist authors would get accusations thrown at me. Heck, why would I recommend it to someone if I did not feel it was worth reading?

Cheers
« Last Edit: August 12, 2009, 01:00:02 pm by KitsuneinDreams » Logged


yewberry
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2014, 04:15:33 pm
United States United States

Posts: 2087

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #9: August 12, 2009, 01:38:55 pm »

Then say that their interpretations are biased or faulty in certain areas (and better still, define those areas, give examples and counter arguments) rather than sum it all up as "overloaded with feminist thought".

<nod, nod>  What you said.  As a feminist, I do my level best to distance myself from that hogwash.

Brina
Logged
yewberry
Adept Member
*****
Last Login:August 02, 2014, 04:15:33 pm
United States United States

Posts: 2087

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #10: August 12, 2009, 01:48:41 pm »

I did not mean to upset anyone, after all, how was I to know that stating I enjoyed a book from feminist authors would get accusations thrown at me. Heck, why would I recommend it to someone if I did not feel it was worth reading?

I don't think you really upset anyone.  It's the point I made in my previous post:  feminist =/= bogus history/poor scholarship.  To me, feminism is a wholly modern concept.  I can look to the past for inspirational stories of strong women, but I don't need an imagined past to create a better future.

We do a lot of clarifying and quibbling here.  It's part of the refinement process, and it doesn't hurt much once you get used to it.  Wink

Brina
Logged
Caroline
Master Member
****
Last Login:October 07, 2011, 11:24:24 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: polytheist
Posts: 478

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #11: August 12, 2009, 02:24:30 pm »

How does feminist thought imply bad scholarship? In no way does it. I sort of feel like I was just put under oath... I mentioned twice that it was very interesting and enjoyable, so how is it really negative. My only complaint was that when addressing a subject, often times they would focus on only one part of the storyt rather than the whole, making it biased; however, by no means does that mean it is not well researched. I don't have the book with me, I bought it for one of my classes three years ago, then sold it back to the bookstore (I was a broke college student). I am merely stating what I remember, one of which is that it was the majority of the class' opinion (18 girls, 3 guys) that the book was biased from a feminist perspective, and as a result felt preachy at times.  Even my professor, who WAS a feminist stated as such, but that is one reason she picked the book, because it was a bold book, giving a new spin to historical archaeology and mythology.

I did not mean to upset anyone, after all, how was I to know that stating I enjoyed a book from feminist authors would get accusations thrown at me. Heck, why would I recommend it to someone if I did not feel it was worth reading?

Cheers

No upset here, but look at this conversation in context. You recc'd a book, with the only proviso that it was 'overloaded with feminist thought' - as though that was a negative quality of its worth.

I poked at that sentiment with my 'oh noes'.

You clarified by saying you meant the author's bias was evident in their interpretations, but didn't elaborate. Which in the context of your first statement could be read, as was pointed out, as 'feminist thought is a biased interpretation.'

So ultimately, great that that you enjoyed it and got something out of it, great that you recc'd it, not so great that the only criticism included in that recc was that it was warning about 'feminist thought' content.

Y'see what I'm getting at?  You agree feminist thought does not equal bad scholarship. Yah! No complaint there. But your previous statements, because of their generality, set that up as the default.

Caroline


Logged
Caroline
Master Member
****
Last Login:October 07, 2011, 11:24:24 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: polytheist
Posts: 478

Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #12: August 12, 2009, 02:30:08 pm »

<nod, nod>  What you said.  As a feminist, I do my level best to distance myself from that hogwash.

Brina

There are some areas of scholarship where a feminist approach is invaluable to correct or counterbalance previously narrow interpretations; women's roles/contribution in history or archeological material cultural has not always been a serious consideration.

But some of the stuff out there... yyyeaaah. Most of it is lay sources, but there's still some real dinos in the ivory towers as well.

Caroline
Logged
Drgong
Senior Apprentice
**
Last Login:March 28, 2011, 05:36:10 pm
United States United States

Religion: LDS -- "Mormon"
Posts: 82


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #13: October 08, 2009, 06:36:59 pm »

I don't think you really upset anyone.  It's the point I made in my previous post:  feminist =/= bogus history/poor scholarship.  To me, feminism is a wholly modern concept.  I can look to the past for inspirational stories of strong women, but I don't need an imagined past to create a better future.

We do a lot of clarifying and quibbling here.  It's part of the refinement process, and it doesn't hurt much once you get used to it.  Wink

Brina

I am glad that I am not the only one who thinks that, My mom and my sisters are very strong women, but they didn't need spurious history to empower them to do great things with their lives.   It is my peeve when a historical writer lays it so thick that you have to question the entire sum of the book as it may be skewed from what the reality was.

Logged

This is a gentle reminder to myself, by the god(s) remember to leave a quote to what you are replying to.   This board prefers quoting.
Carnelian
Master Member
****
Last Login:January 15, 2012, 12:55:04 pm
Canada Canada

Religion: Greek paganism
Posts: 289


Blog entries (0)



Ignore
« Reply #14: October 09, 2009, 12:02:52 am »

To me, feminism is a wholly modern concept.

Of course it's a wholly modern concept. It's arisen out of the fact that women have been exploited by men pretty much since the dawn of human existence.
Logged

Donor Ad: Become a Silver or Gold Donor to get your ad here.

Tags:
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Add bookmark  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
  Portal   Forum   Help Rules Search Chat (Mux) Articles Login Register   *

* Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)


EU Cookie Notice: This site uses cookies. By using this site you consent to their use.


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.062 seconds with 51 queries.