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Author Topic: Texas Public Schools Required to Teach Bible This Year  (Read 20357 times)
sailor_tech
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« Reply #60: September 07, 2009, 07:48:45 pm »

as an aside note, just knowing about books like ruth from the christian spin, do you have any good links for the jewish spin on those?

Only general sites.

www.myjewishlearning.com

www.aish.com

Both have study sections.

Big thing on Ruth and other books such as the various Prophets is to read them as if you reading them when they were written.  Not reading into them stuff that requires knowledge of the New Testement materials.
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« Reply #61: September 07, 2009, 08:16:40 pm »

To bad you don't have a few Jewish teachers doing this course in the smaller schools.  Putting a Jewish spin on books like Ruth would really mess up the kid's parents opinions about having Bible taught as religion in public schools. 

My friends daughter is seeing material from the Tanakh being taught as literature, but the spin is Christian and is very different than what she learned in shul.


One of the best articles I ever read on this issue was penned by a Texas Southern Baptist Preacher who lived with his family for awhile in Asia somewhere (I can't remember exactly where), and he learned first hand what it was like to have a child in a school where there was a co-mingling of the secular/sectarian, and he walked away from the experience understanding what it was like to be a minority religion. He said it was humbling and life changing and never again would he want a religious spin given to a child's education. Apparently his children received quite a bit of Buddhist teachings in their school.

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« Reply #62: September 07, 2009, 09:53:02 pm »

One of the best articles I ever read on this issue was penned by a Texas Southern Baptist Preacher who lived with his family for awhile in Asia somewhere (I can't remember exactly where), and he learned first hand what it was like to have a child in a school where there was a co-mingling of the secular/sectarian, and he walked away from the experience understanding what it was like to be a minority religion. He said it was humbling and life changing and never again would he want a religious spin given to a child's education. Apparently his children received quite a bit of Buddhist teachings in their school.



Hmm. Saw a similar one with an Air Force officer who was living in Hawaii. Went to the local football game 1 time and of course stood for when they asked people to stand for prayer. He & wife were appalled when it was a Buddist leading the invocation.
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« Reply #63: September 08, 2009, 12:41:21 pm »

To bad you don't have a few Jewish teachers doing this course in the smaller schools.  Putting a Jewish spin on books like Ruth would really mess up the kid's parents opinions about having Bible taught as religion in public schools. 

My friends daughter is seeing material from the Tanakh being taught as literature, but the spin is Christian and is very different than what she learned in shul.


Someone could always go with a response I got on another forum to the same item:

"They know how to read, that counts as Bible literacy"


You could also get someone fresh out of college from a decent school who studied History or the Classics going into this.  Both disciplines have fun pounding home that the Bible is not considered an acceptable primary source unless you are in Biblical History quite regularly.  That should have some fun for parents hoping they get some fire and brimstone fundie talking about taking it literally.
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« Reply #64: September 13, 2009, 10:14:29 am »

Like I said, Texas never funds this sort of thing. Sad

Confusion reigns over Texas Bible-literacy law

DALLAS — Some Texas school districts are scrambling to interpret a state law that requires public schools to incorporate Bible literacy into the curriculum.

http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/news.aspx?id=22059
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« Reply #65: October 31, 2009, 09:57:53 pm »

Like I said, Texas never funds this sort of thing. Sad

Confusion reigns over Texas Bible-literacy law

DALLAS — Some Texas school districts are scrambling to interpret a state law that requires public schools to incorporate Bible literacy into the curriculum.

http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/news.aspx?id=22059

Problem is that many rural areas are homogeneously Christian--even homogeneously Pentacostal, or conservative Protestant/RCC, or just simply one church.  To those who live there, it's inconceivable that there could be any other view possible of such important matters, and their ministers reinforce this parochialism with condemnations of urban dwellers and their evils.  So you get cities that are liberal, such as Austin, and surrounding areas that are diehard reactionary.  And this is true not just in the US, but pretty much everywhere, from what I've read or the little I've seen.
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« Reply #66: October 31, 2009, 10:03:34 pm »

Problem is that many rural areas are homogeneously Christian--even homogeneously Pentacostal, or conservative Protestant/RCC, or just simply one church.  To those who live there, it's inconceivable that there could be any other view possible of such important matters, and their ministers reinforce this parochialism with condemnations of urban dwellers and their evils.  So you get cities that are liberal, such as Austin, and surrounding areas that are diehard reactionary.  And this is true not just in the US, but pretty much everywhere, from what I've read or the little I've seen.

Cities in general* tend to be more liberal than rural areas.  It probably has something to do with their heterogeneously which allows for different viewpoints to be heard by more people.

*One execption that I'm aware of is Atlanta, Georgia which is near the top of my list places I will not move to until a flock of geese flies out of my ears.  I am sure there are others, though.
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« Reply #67: October 31, 2009, 11:46:52 pm »

Cities in general* tend to be more liberal than rural areas.  It probably has something to do with their heterogeneously which allows for different viewpoints to be heard by more people.

I suspect that the rural hinterlands of Doric Greek probably hated those intellectual philosophers, and the farmers in provinces around Rome no doubt grumbled at the high-living, wasteful, blasphemous types who lived in the big city.  This is a meme that seems almost eternal, or as long as cities have existed.  I'm happy to say that I'm an urban type, and the various agricultural festivals associated with the Craft--though being a witch, myself--mean frankly very little to me.  I haven't planted corn, wheat, oats, soybeans, or any other crop in at least a lifetime.  And I'm happy with that.  I like the intermix of ideas that comes in a big city with many different cultures, and all the arts, dining, museums, etc.  Doesn't mean I won't sit down, envision a tarot card, and walk through it.  Just means I've got some different priorities, I suppose.

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*One execption that I'm aware of is Atlanta, Georgia which is near the top of my list places I will not move to until a flock of geese flies out of my ears.  I am sure there are others, though.

I wasn't aware that Atlanta was that bad, though it's good to know.  Certainly the greater Cleveland area, where we've moved to, is not exactly a liberal community, though it seems to be slowly loosening up.  (Some local pagans tell me that the city has grown quite a bit over the last generation of two, so that the elderly conservative population is slowly being replaced by a more moderate group.  Mind, my white hairs would probably fit me into the young side of the elderly population, but I just don't fit that demographic in most ways.)

Wish we could have afforded to move to Boston, though.  Now, there's a fine, open-minded community, not afraid of thought or its consequences.
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« Reply #68: November 02, 2009, 04:15:55 pm »

Hmm. Saw a similar one with an Air Force officer who was living in Hawaii. Went to the local football game 1 time and of course stood for when they asked people to stand for prayer. He & wife were appalled when it was a Buddist leading the invocation.


Why was he appalled by it? Does that normally not happen? I don't think religious teachings belong in a grade school but as a highschool elective class it would seem more appropriate, because they would have the choice. I was always interested in learning about Judism in highschool but didn't know how to go about studying it.
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« Reply #69: November 02, 2009, 04:27:35 pm »

Why was he appalled by it? Does that normally not happen? I don't think religious teachings belong in a grade school but as a highschool elective class it would seem more appropriate, because they would have the choice. I was always interested in learning about Judism in highschool but didn't know how to go about studying it.

He was appalled because he assumed it would be a christian prayer, because it was supposed to be because that's what prayers in the US are.  He forgot that some areas in the US are christian minority.  There aren't very many of them, but when a closeminded christian encounters them, they tend to get a shock.  More openminded or attention-paying christians aren't quite so shocked by it.
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« Reply #70: November 02, 2009, 05:02:33 pm »

Why was he appalled by it? Does that normally not happen? I don't think religious teachings belong in a grade school but as a highschool elective class it would seem more appropriate, because they would have the choice. I was always interested in learning about Judism in highschool but didn't know how to go about studying it.

As Mandrina said. it was a football game, not an elective class.
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« Reply #71: November 02, 2009, 05:06:09 pm »

As Mandrina said. it was a football game, not an elective class.

I understood it was a football game, I just didn't understand why someone would be appalled. Then again, I am the most backward thinking person I know so maybe I don't see things as others do.  Smiley
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« Reply #72: November 02, 2009, 06:23:54 pm »

I understood it was a football game, I just didn't understand why someone would be appalled. Then again, I am the most backward thinking person I know so maybe I don't see things as others do.  Smiley

See  my previous post.  He was appalled because he assumed that it would be a christian prayer, since this is the US.  In the US, prayers at games are supposed to be Christian.  Many people assume that there are no pockets of minorityreligion majority in the US, and at those places, a minority religion would be the one used at public events.  This would appall a closeminded Christian, while probably not phasing an openminded one, or at least one who paid attention to the environment where he was.  This guy obviously didn't catch that he was in one of the minorityreligion majority areas, or if he did, he didn't think it extended to the people in charge of the football game.
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